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MIMES AND MUSIC

(By "Orpheus.") | t |

THE SHOWS. OPERA HOUSE. Willmighby Dramatic Company, in season to 26th February. "Aladdin" Pantomime, 26th February to 7th March. HIS MAJESTY'S. Brennan-Fuller Vaudeville. THE KINO'S THEATRE. Pictures nightly. STAR THEATRI. Pictures nightly. EMPRESS THEATRE. Continuous Pictures. THE NEW THBATRK. Csntinuous Pictures. SHORTT'S THEATBB. Continuous Pictures. PEOPLE'S PICTURE PALACB. Continuous Pictures. BRITANNIA THEATRE. Continuous Pictures. I Pantomime is always popular, so it goes without saying that the season of " Aladdin," which commences at the Opera House next Thursday evening, should be a successful one. For some years past Wellingtonians have had to rely on the Williamson firm for its "panto.," excepting on one occasion when Clarke and Meynell gave us a magnificent production of "Cinderella"; now another producer is in the fieldGeorge Willoughby —and this gentleman announces that he will give, to Wellington something much above the average in "Aladdin." "Aladdin" has just con* eluded a remarkably successful season in Sydney, and comes to New Zealand quite fresh. A short season has been played at Newcastle, and the company, scenery, dresses, and all the usual appurtenances will be seen here before bemg produced in the other large centres in Australia. Mr. Willoughby has succeeded in obtaining the services of a host of artists in the first flight in the musical comedy world, notably Miss Carrie Moore, Miss Grace Palotfca (who is endeared to Wellingtonians), Miss Mabel Batchelor, and Miss Nellie Sneddon. Mr. Percy Clifton, Mi-. Bert Barton, Mr. J. P. O'Neill, Mr. Edward Stanley, and Mr. Ernest Pitcher are the comedians, and judging by Sydney press notices they are as fine a combination of "fun merchants" aa could be wished to see. A novelty to New Zealand will be a Ragtime Revue, which _ was specially invented for "Aladdin" by Mr. Lester Brown, of New York. The ballets, marches, and ensembles are said to be special features of "Aladdin," and are carried out by a bevy of handsome Australian girls. The specialties for the pantomime have been specially imported, and include Leon Morris and his wrestling ponies. xVlatinees will be given during the season. An attraction for next week at His Majesty's Theatre will be the Five Musical Lassies, a combination which has just concluded a triumphal tour of the United States and Australia. The Lassies, dressed in kilts, give a musical turn, playing selections, both popular and classical, on cornets, trombones, etc. Scotch medleys are a feature, and they also give vocal duets and trios, and the bagpipes, of course, are brought into requisition. The Lassies travel with gorgeous scenic effects. Their first set is described as very pretty, and is followed by a_ marble palace scene, in which the Lassies, dressed in white robes, give as a finale the music of various national airs. The Dandies are now permanently established at St. Kilda (Melbourne), Manly (Sydney), Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide, and Tasmania. This year will see a permanent company in New Zealand. Including artists, staffs, lyric topical writers, oversea representatives, etc., the Edward Branscombe Proprietary employs over ISO people all the year round. Song-lovers will be pleased that the charming Antonia Dolores is in 'the Dominion once more. The gifted lady arrived in Wellington last Wednesday, and after a short holiday in this city will commence a comprehensive tour of the Dominion. The tour will open in Dunedin on 3rd March, and after visiting all the principal South Island towns, Wellington will be reached on the 24th March. The tour will probably end at Auckland towards the end of May, and then Mdlle. Dolores will tour Australia. Mr. John Hopkins, well known in theatrical circles,, and who conducted tho successful Mardi Gras at Napier recently, will act as touring manager. The music and songs in tho pantomime "Aladdin," to be staged at the Opera House next Thursday, are said to be very alluring. The vocal numbers include "Whistle It" (a catchy, song which has never failed to get the audience whistling it), " Heart that's Free," " How Do You Do, Miss Ragtime " (one of the successes of the pantomime), "Trail of the Lonesome Pine," "I Want to Go Back to Sydney," and "When the Band Stops Playing in the Park," Miss Grace Palotta's number. Mr. Wynne Jones, an old Wellington boy, is the conductor of the orchestra. Harry Lauder, the renowned Scotch comedian, who is to open in Australia in Aprilnext, is a great admirer of America and its many institutions. The comparative spirit of equality and the lack of class instinct in the United States appeals strongly to the democratic feelings of the entertainer, and he is never tired of eulogising the progressive municipal habits of the great cities. One thing only he objects to in America, and that is what he calls its dangerous doctrine of "hustle." He declares that American energy can be carried too far, and appropriately fixes his point with a story. He once saw a, friend hurrying down a subway to reach a Courthouse, and asked him why he was taking that particular direction. "I sa.ve a minute by this way," said the friend. "And what will you do with that minute now you have saved it?" enquired Lauder quietly. There is a strong probability that Paderewski, the eminent Continental pianist, will make a visit to Australia very shortly. The famous musician, who was born on 6th November, 1860, and who is now in his o4th year, is at present on an American tour, and .being received with the universal enthusiasm that has always attended the magic of his name and his work. Paderewski probably would have visited Australia last year had it not been for the very highly remunerative contract which he is now fulfilling in America. The maestro has happy reminiscences of his previous Australian tour, and frankly longs to return to this country (says a Sydney paper). Mr. John Lemmone states that Madame Melba is appearing in America at present under engagement to a wealthy syndicate, who have given her a lump hum and a percentage of takings on a roDfert tour, embracing the largest towns of the United States. The tour, according to a letter received last Monday, has been the most successful financially that the great soprano has ever undertaken. Melba wrote that she was in the very beat of health, aud, if possible, would Bpend her winter in Australia, arriving here either in April or early in May. She mentioned nothing about giving concerts here, though, of course, her visit could not be complete without some arrangement for her tv sint: in the big capitals The only ob> Btacle in tho way to her visit to Auei>xalia> ibis xgai; v » verbal prpuiiea .to

the Covent Garden Theatre proprietary to sing at the opera headquarters in May, June, and July. If the contract can be evaded, Madam© Melba will shortly be with her own people. Miss Mabel Batchelor, who has beenplaying the soprano role in the successful pantomime production of "Aladdin" by the Wflloughby Company, Ltd.. at the Adelphi Theatre, will accompany the organisation on a tour through Niew Zealand. It is interesting. to note (says Sydney Telegraph) that Miss Batchelor was, and still ia, a protege of Mr. John Lemmone. She came originally from Fort-etreet Girlß' School, and was taken by her master on a tour of Australia, co-operating with him as principal soprano in touring companies for over nine years. She was also the soprano singer in the companies organised to support Mark Hambourg. Mies Batchelor's mosfc recent achievement, prior to her app.ear- j ance as leading boy in "Aladdin," was her acceptance, at a moment's notice, of the part of Muaetta in "La Boheme" in Madame Melba's Company, in consequence of the illness of the lady officially cast for the part. Messrs. J. and N. Tait have now completed the company required to support Harry Lauder in his forthcoming tour of Australasia. Among the artists already secured are the Hussans, the famous whirling acrobatic dancers ; Ernest Sewell, the brilliant English ventriloquist and marionette dancer; and Selwyn Driver, a noted monologist. Other artists who have contracted to appear with Lauder are D'Arc, the unique Diabolo performer;' Miss Kitty Ryan, the Irish ballad singer j and Horace Sheldon, a clever musician recently appearing at the London Palladium. The Lauder tour will be opened at the Princess's Theatre, Melbourne, on Easter Saturday, 11th April, for a season of one month, followed by a week in Ade- I laide. The Sydney season will consist of four weeks at the Palace Theatre during May-June, after which Queensland and New Zealand will probably be visited. Maud Allan, the renowned classical dancer, who will shortly be visiting Australia accompanied by the brillaint Cherniavsky trio, achieved a tremendous success on her recent visit to India. As is well known the young dancer secured a, tremendous, though entirely unsolicited advertisement from the foolish controversy upon her art. The question as to whether her appearance in scanty raiment would affect British prestige in India was taken up and argued with a fury and seriousness altogether beyond the merits of the case. The argument did not hurt anybody and only resulted in an immense waste of pen, ink, and good conversation, but it benefited the dancer to the extent of making her known throughout India. The result was that when she appeared she was a triumph, and in one week alone her takings were over £3000. Miss Evelyn Ward, one of the most popular members of tho Red Dandies, and who has a large circle of acquaintances in this city, will sever her connectkwTwith the company at the conclusion of the present season at St. Kilda, Melbourne. Miss Ward then goes to Adelaide, there to be married. Miss Ward has been a member of the Dandies for five years past. Her secession is to be regretted. Under date 9th January, Sydney Morning Herald's London correspondent writes :—": — " The revue craze shows no sign of abating. On the contrary, it has invaded the music-hall programmes with such effect that at most of the leading houses, and at many of the smaller ones, a revue takes the place of one-half of the solo turns. Theatres like the Alhambra and the Hippodrome feature revue as the great attraotion of their programmes, and at those houses ' Keep Smiling * and ' Hullo, Tango ' pursue a victorious career. At the Empire, similarly, ' Nuts and Wine,* not a very brilliant specimen, is the new feature. But the spread of the revue is better seen in the case of places like the Coliseum, the Oxford, and the Pavilion, where it has come to have ! quite larger significance. It is no novelty even at the suburban music halls to see the variety artists' turns come to end, and the stage fill with a company of 20 or 30 people for an h6ur'» topical travesty. ' ' Miss May Beatty, late of Christ- | church, is praised highly for her share in the success of the pantomime "Babes in the Wood" at the Grand Theatre, Glasgow. The Daily Record says : " The ladies have a big say in the success of the pantomime. It is many days since we saw a principal boy like Miss May Beatty. Practically born to the stage, she has the unique distinction of being a gifted operatic artiste. Miss Beatty, in addition to having a beautiful figure, acts well, and gives just that touch of artistry which is the hall mark of perfection in either vaudeville or musical comedy. Her songs — 'My Persian Rose,' 'You Made Me Love You,' and ' Hello, Little Tommy Atkins ' — are one of the outstanding features of the production, the lastnamed number, which is sung in the Starland scene, in itself a triumph of stagecraft, being a tuneful and catchy one that is certain to win popularity." Mr. 0. P. Heggie continues to make it clear that an Australian actor may sometimes achieve high distinction — aa opposed to rumours of the same— on the London stage. Mr. Heggie is a South Australian, who, after studying einging at the Adelaide Conservator! urn of Music, entered the dramatic profession, and .was soon playing the Messenger in "The Message from Mars " all over Australasia. Coming to London after five yeara of Australian work, his talents seenred him admission to the right set. His first success was made a few years ago at the Duke of York's, in Shaw's " Misalliance," and in 1907 he was Ellen Terry's juvenile lead in an American tour. Lately he made a fine success at the St. James's by his wellstudied Androcles in Shaw's poor farce of that name, and he is now prominent as the Rev. Cyril Smith in G. K. Chesterton's " Magk." It may be added, says a Sydney writer, that Mr. Heggie thoroughly deserves all his success. Playgoers have been greatly interested by the announcement that, figuring in the cast of "Joseph and His Brethren,"to be produced in Australia short ly, will be the name of Miss Nancy Stewart, daughter of Miss Nellie Stewart. Strange to say (says the Sydney Daily Telegraph) young Miss Stewart's ambitions towards a stage career are entirely opposed by the wishes, of her mother on the subject, her desire being for her daughter to become a musician. For Miss Nancy Stewart, who was educated in Switzerland, received a training for five years as a pianiste at the Coneervatorium in Lausanne, and attained such prominence and proficiency that she was taken in hand for personal tuition by the master himself, M. Nicati. On returning to Australia she became musical director of Miss Nellie Stewart's "Sweet Nell of Old Drury" Company, which set out on a lengthy tour of Australia. Miss Nellie Stewart has always been opposed to her daughter going on the stage, but ultimately allowed Miss Nancy to have her own way and enter upon the career she loves. There are parallel cases of opposition on the part of parents in the profession to 'their children following in the footsteps by joining the stage. For example >»It was quite against the wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Titheradge that Miss Madge Titheradge became an actress, the objections being withdrawn only after long opposition. Miss Nancy Stewart has charm, personality, and ability, and there are many who hope that «ho will follow ill her i mother's footetejpi.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19140221.2.142

Bibliographic details

MIMES AND MUSIC, Evening Post, Volume LXXXVII, Issue 44, 21 February 1914

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2,374

MIMES AND MUSIC Evening Post, Volume LXXXVII, Issue 44, 21 February 1914

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