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THE ALL BLACKS

CALIFORNIAN TOUR A SUCCESSFUL FINISH DETAILS OF THE FJNAL GAMES. s \ X (FIIOJI 4)«R OWN CORRESPONDBiNT.) ' On arrival in San Francisco on Monday, f loth November, , conditions for good football were found to be still unfavourable and great doubt prevailed as to 'whether or not we should be able to play our second game against. Santa Clara. In fact, until 11 o'clock on the morning 6f Wednesday, everyone was under thfc impression that the game had been postponed and one or two hacl gone off tovisit friends when a wire was received from Father Eli, of the Santa, Clara University stating that they had decided to play. After some difficulty the team was hurriedly got together — M'Gregor being left behind — and a sprint was made for the train. ' Playing on such a day seemed altogether out of the question, but on arrival a.t the University the tain cleared off considerably and the field, although a dirt one, turned out wonderfully dry. , The team was aa follows: — Cuthill, Stohr, R. Roberts, ( Loveridge, Mitchin j son, Gray, Taylor, Williams, Sellars, Wylie, Downing, Dewar, M'Donald, Caittj and Murray. Tries were scored by :— Sellars (2)j Stohr (2), Loveridge (2), Taylor (1), Mitchinson (1). R. Roberts converted two, Stohr one, and the last mentioned kicked a fine penalty goal. The game on the whole was, from the onlookers' point of view, an excellent exhibtion of Rugby football, and judging by the applause seemed to be 'much appreciated. I have purposely said "Irom the onlookers' point t>f view/ for from our own point of view the game was far from being what it ought to have been. The chief fault, due no doubt to the ease with, which we had won our .former games, lay with the forwards. Individually they were all that could be desired, but collectively their play was weak and> ragged, and selfishness was far too prevalent. Yet in Bpite of what bad play there waa out pafck proved too strong for its vigorous but lighter opponents, and the score of 33 ,to nil was a fair criterion" of the day's play. Of the foi-wards M'Donald and iDewar put Up very fine performances, while among the backs Mitchinson and Gray showed out promineHtly. F.USAL GAME IN CALIFORNIA.' On Friday morning, in preparation for the "AlliStai 1 " game, a good practice was indulged in. Saturday, the day of the final test >nd also of our last game in California,, proved an ideal day, and by 1 p.m., the scheduled time for the kick-off, some ten or twelve thousand spectators had collected ofi the Californian University's field (dirt) io. witness the game. The following was the team:— Cuthill, Mitchinson, Roberts, M'Gregor, Gray, M'Kenzie, Taylor, Cain, SeUard, Graham, Downing, Wylie, M'Donald, Dewar, and Murray. Tries -were scored by R. Roberts (3), M'Kenzie (2), G.ay (2), Murray (2), M'Donald (2), Wylie (1), and M'Gregor Graham converted 4, Mitchinson and M'Donald one each. Contrary to the expectations of both the Americans and ourselves, the game proved c hollow victory. In no previous games had lack of combination on the part of the Californian teams been so evident as in this gam?. They were hope.lessly outclassed from start to finish, and had it. not) been f of the defence of one •or two of their banks, prominent among whom was Carrotf, one of last year's ■Waratahs, the score would have been much greater than 51 to 3. Yet the; defeat, although somewhat humiliating to our opponents,, was certainly no disgrace. They/, fought the game out doggedly amMeterminedly ;'but the dash and vigour of our forwards, the speed and' trickiness of our backs, and the .combined movements of both' proved altogether too much for them, a.nd they had to acknowledge unreservedly that they were defeated by a much superior team —a thing which «an American dislikes more than any other. Our own team undoubtedly gave a wonderful exhibition, and, with only one or two exception's, an almost, faultless one. -To mention any one player as (showing more prominently than the others is not possible, for everyone played as N«w Zealand representatives are expected to" play. , • GOOD-BYE TO SAN FRANCISCO..", Immediately after the game a hurried rush was made for the boat, which had been delayed three hours for us, and at 5 p.m. we bade a sorrowful farewell to San Francisco. During our departure rather a laughable incident occurred. Mr. Mason, who for some reason or other had been delayed, arrived at the whaVf in time to_eee the steamer moving off, and would have been left behind had it not been that the steamer had to turn in mid-channel. This allowed him to charter a motor launch and catch' us before getting under way. On the evening of Monday, 17th • November, after a very pleasant forty-eight hours' voyage, We arrived in Seattle. Next morning we trandJUpped to the boat for Victoria, arriving, in that city about lunch hour. VICTORIAN TEAM DEFEATED. The following day we met and defeated the Victorian team by 23 points to nil, The team was : — Cuthill, Lynch, R. Roberts, Loveridge, Mitchinson, Gray, E. Roberts, Sellara, Williams, Graham, Downing, Dewar, M'Donald, Cain, and Murray. This gjyne proved to be by far the hardest during the whole tour, and it was only lack of ability in driving home an attack that prevented the Victorians' from scoring several times. They showed a far greater knowledge of back play than did the Californians, and were inferior to them only in line-kicking, which, at times was undoubtedly very weak. Their forwards, including an old Welsh international representative who, by the 1 way, was first reserve forward for Wales in 1905, when ' v^les defeated New Zealand, also were superiol* to the Californian forwards, and in line-out work especially they showed up to great advantage. Our own team gave a dashing, clever exhibition, and Teddy Robets at half called forth rounds of applause by spme of. his bewildering tactics. The only fault in our own bafck play lajn with 'Roberts at centre-three'- , quarter, who, although making some 'brilliant moves, lost us several certain trieß through selfishness. On Saturday, 22nd November, the weather, which since our arrival had been wet and dull, now cleared up beautifully, and a fine game was practically assured. Nor were we disappointed : J,he ground proved to be much drier than in the previous match, and our backs were thus enabled to play a much faster and opener game. Tha team was: Stohr, Lynch, R. Roberts, M'Gregor, xM'Kenzie, Gray, Taylor, Sellars. Cain, Atkinson, Downing, Dewar, M'Donald, Douglas, and Murray. Tries were scored by Lynch (4), M'Gregor (2), M'Kenzie, and Taylor; Cain Roberts, and Stohr converted on« each, and Stohr kicked a penalty. This game proved to be practically a repetition of our forme.!' oil*.

During the game a very sad accident occurred, which casb a gloom over- the rest of our stay in Canada. Early in the first spell Peter Ogden, full-back for Victoria, while going down to stop a, forward rush, struck his head on someone's knee. On rising he seemed slightly dazed, yet went on playing as if nothing were wrong. Two minutes before time he was tackled with the ball in his possession. This time he did not rise, and ort examination by a doctor he was immediately ordered to the hospital, but ho quietly passed away during the journey. The sad news was received early in the evening, and for the rest of the night 'an atmosphere of deepest gloom pervaded among both footballers and supporters. At the inquest on Monday, 24th November, the doctor in his evidence stated that there were no marks- on de* ceased's head to show that any blow had been_ received. The Coroner returned a verdict of accidental death, no blame being attachable to anyone. Early on the day following the match we departed by boat for Vancouver, arriving in that\ city late the same evening. Owing to the sad occurrence in Victoria all official entertainment was cancelled, and we had to "spend oiir time as best we could. THE LAST GAME. On Tuesday, 26th November, the day of our garae against Vancouver and of oui' last game in America, the rain, which had been falling at intervals for several days, ceased, but on arrival at the ground in the afternoon we found a second Athletic Park, Wellington,, after a Week's steady rain. The team was :— Cuthill, ' M'Gregor, Loveridge, Stohr, Mitchinson, M'Kenize, E. Eoberts, Sellars, Williams, M'Donald, Downing, Douglas, Cain, Atkinson, Dewar. Tries were scored by Mitchinson 4,, M'Gregor 4, E. Roberts 2, M'Kenzie 1, Stohr 1. Stohr converted four. . Before the game speculation was rife as to whether our total number of points would exceed 600, but any doubts were set ' at rest by the way in which the b»y» let out to make the necessary mtnv bei' of points. They went out to make a brilliant showing in their last game in America, and, despite the conditions, they succeeded. The Vancouver team was outclassed in every department of the game. Neither individually nor collectively did they make a showing, and only once during the whole game did they look irk any way dangerous. Our own backs handled the wet ball splendidly, and on no occasion did they make any serious slips. Mitchinson, ' E. Roberts, Cuthill, and M'Gregor, all played fine fames, while Stohr excelled himself in is goal kicking. The forwards also played a sterling game, . their short, snappy passing rushes, and their great Command over the wet ball completely paralysing their opponents. At this game our supporters were more numerous than at any other, a large number of New Zealanders having come along to support the players from their native land. • i - On the following afternootfT26th November, we departed for home by the R.M.S. Niagara. .Several hundred people came down to the wharf to bid us " Bon voyage," and at 3. j>.m. we moved off from the wharf amid the cheers and good wishes of our New Zealand and Canadian friends On the way down we spent the night at Victoria, bidding a long farewell to American shores at about 7 o'clock next msrning. ' •

« L >' JO es Be. a S3 14 .. Cain .. 14 .. Sellars .. ' 8 ... Williams 14 I. Downing /IS .. M'Donald 14 .. Dewar .. 10 .. Graham -. 8 .. Douglas '12 .. Murray 8 .. Atkinson 2.. Bruce .. ,11... Wylle ..f 10 .. Taylor .. 6 .. E, Roberts 11 .. Gray ,11 .. M'Kenzie 12 . . Mitchinson 8 .. Loveridge 12 .. R. Roberts 10 .. Lynch '18 ... M'Gregor 14 .. CuthilF ' 9.. Stohr s-« & 1 I .s S V • ..... *„',« a • .2 a <i 5 .2 14 O O O O HO O (S H v. 3 1 0 -0. 11 ..20006 .. 1 . Q 0 L 0 3, „ ' 6 0 0 0 18 ..11 1 0 0 35 ..10003 .. 4 23 2 0 64 ".. '7" 0 .>0 ,0 21 ' ..11 0 0 • 0 33 ..10008, ..10003 ..6 0 0 0 18 •„5 0 0 0 15 ..0 0 0 0 18 ..30009 „12 0 0 0 36 .. 19 3 2 1 .48 ..6 1 0 0 20 ..15 0 1 0 60 ..16 1 0 * 0 SO ..IS 0 0 0 46 .. 7 '5 ' 0 0 31 .. 7 13 8 0 66 Grand total •.. 166 57 8 1 010 EECORD. ' \ Points Points for. dgst. - t. Olympic Club -.. ■». /19 0 /, y. University of California.. 81 0 t y.' Barbarians 30 0 v. Stanford University ..v 64 0 v, Stanford University ..86 0 V. Santa Clara .. ..42 0 v. Unjversity of California ..38 3 v. University of Nevada . . -55 0 v. University of California ... 33 0 V. Bt. Mttfy'H 26 '0 v. University of Southern Cal. 40 0 v. Santa Clara .. .. ..33 0 v. All American .' 51 3 • v. Victoria .. .. '..23 0 v. Victoria .. .. ..35 0* v. Vancouver >«• v-« «.. 44 0 Grand ..- .. .. 810 6

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THE ALL BLACKS, Evening Post, Volume LXXXVI, Issue 149, 20 December 1913

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THE ALL BLACKS Evening Post, Volume LXXXVI, Issue 149, 20 December 1913

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