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THE TURF.

NOTES AND COMMENTS (By" Sir Bedivere.) ENGLISH STATISTICS. Complete lists of winning owners, breeders, trainers, riders, sires, and horses in England during the past year aro now to hand, and," together with commentary matter thereon, occupy rather more than fifteen columns of the Sportsman. Thanks almost solely to Prince Palatine, the defunct Persimmon heads the list of winning sires with £21,993; Cyllene, now in the Argentine, coming next with £21,478, of which Tagalie earned £11,200. Then follow throe of- St. Simon's sons, in Desmond, St. Frusquin, and Chaucer, whilst sixth place is held by St. Simon's near Telalivo Rock Sand, who was recently landed in France. Spearmint is in tenth place, with £11,184— a good result, for the second, year in which he has been represented. Among other young sires that have done well aro Thrush and Poly melus. The Hon. G. Lambton heads the list of winning trainers, with £22,88?, followed by H. Beard&ley, £21,289, and R. Wootton, £19,930. Wootton, however, lia-s the distinction of having prepared the greatest number of winners. His son Frank nob only won more races than any other jockey, but he secured the greatest percentage of successes, viz. ,' 26.94, as against Manor's 24.60. Hewitt had 119 mounts, and won 12 race 3. Mr. W. Hall Walker is in the forefront of breeders,, eleven horses bred by him having collectively won eighteen races of a total value of £26,141. Prince Palatine was, of course, the bright particular star among them. America was represented by 76 winners of 119 races, worth in all £39,846, whilst France sup. plied 12 winners of 38 laces, worth £17,293. All Australia is credited with is one winner of £142. As only those who train at Newmarket are licensed by the Jockey Clab, there is no record of the exact number of trainers following their profession in theUnited Kingdom. Last year, howevor, 180 of them turned out at least one winner apiece. There were 196 licensed jockeys (exdusivo of cross-country horsemen) and 225 apprentices, or 421 riders in all, of whom 131 won one of more races. By way of comparison, it may be^ worthy of note that there are now 337 trainers, 268 jockeys (inclusive of cic«s-country horsemen), and 83.apprentices licensed in New Zealand. This, in consideration of the number of, horses in commission and the number of race, meetings held in the two countries, seems to be strangely disproportionate. It is to be accounted for, however, in several ways, first among them beihg the increased facilities of travel enjoyed in*. England. As a consequence of this, many distant owners are content to train at the same centre, and leading trainers become happy in the supervision of enormous strings. Jockeys are able to get from one point to another with despatch, | and, unlike the conditions prevailing here, there is in England never an undue amount of clashing of racing dates. The Swallow, who won .the Flying Handicap at Porangahat^ is a six-year-old half-sister, by Memwee, to Stray* bird, who for quite a number of yeats was a regular attendant at Riccarton in August. Following were the principal winning owners at- the Marton meeting:— A. E. Neale £380, J. M. Cameron £330, J. Torrens £190, F. Preston £175, H. M'Manaway £130, H. J. Cameron £130, F. J. Hathaway £96, Ross Alien, W. Homes, H. M. Speed, £90 each; R.. A. M'Kenaie, J. Robson, J. Paterson, £85 each ; J. O'Meara, £56 and bracelet /value £10 10s 5 J. Harle, £50. Mr. Dudley Gibson, who is expected to arrive in Wellington shortly to take up his position as paid steward, was at the time of his appointment acting as stipendiary steward for the- Southern District Racing Association in New South Wales. He was among the final eight for the positions of stipendiary stewards at Flemington. The new tea kiosk, which is being erected at Trentham, is mow ' nearing completion, and it is expected that all will be in readiness for the summer meeting. Additional accommodation will also be available m connection with the stewards' stand., Bluebird has been withdrawn from all engagements at the Wellington bummer Meeting, and Martel has been scratched for the" Nursery Handicap. So much has been heard recently ( of the alleged incompetelicy of English starters that it is interesting to note what an authority such as B. Wootton has to say on the subject. VWien interviewed recently in , Sydney, he expressed the opinion that the starting in England is as good as anywhere else in the world, and there are few racing men better qualified to express an opinion on the subject. While favouring the standing as against the walk-up start, he holds that a starter should not be forced to observe any hard-and-fast rule J>a the point. Woob. ton believes the starter should bo allowed to seize the best opportunity presenting itself. Wootton' s ttay m *Uistralia will be a short one, and so satisfied is he with the conditions prevailing in Engla-nd that he will probably do all his future facing there. Sharpshooter, who is now owned by Mr. A. Rawdoii, was successful in the Croydon Welter at Adelaide on Boxing Day. He was fairly well fancied, and returned a modeiate dividend. On the same day the Trial Handicap, at Brisbane, fell to Strike Fund, by Birkeii' head— -Snooze. One of the most exciting steeplechases ever witnessed on the course watt that run ' at the Port Adelaide Cup Meeting at Cheltenham on Boxing Day. Immediately after the rise of the barrier horses began to fall, and (says a writer in the Referee) the ambulance was unablo to cope with the numerous accidents. Hopeless, ridden by H. H. Howward, led for the first time round, but the second timo she fell, and was killed, and Blackstone, ridden by H. Hall, also fell, and was killed. Several jockeys received minor injuries. All this, of course, comes from asking horses to race over unyielding fences when the ground is as hard as flint. The filly by Marble Arch from Erry Roe that fell to Sir James Carroll's bid of 400gns last week is to be placed under J. Rae's guidance at Ellerslie. Mr. W. G. Davidson's luck wae anything but good at the A.R.C. Summer Meeting, for both his representatives) Sylverlyte and Goldfinder, pulled up more or less unsound. It was the intention to have shipped Midnight Sun and Ventura to Sydney on Monday next, and spaco had been booked for the pair, but the arrangemerits Were cancelled, and they will probably be seen out at UlO Wellington R.C. Summer Meeting.—- Auckland Star. A special train, consisting of an engine and numerous horse boxes, left , Auckland for the South yesterday.

Trainers and others concerned much appreciated tho convenience of this arrangement. It is a long time t-ince a horse has so completely captured the Auckland public us Bobrikoff has done. When Mr. Lowry's champion won the Auckland Cup he got a great reception, which (says "Whalebone") was repeated when he won the Islington Plate, but it was left to the laet day of the meeting, when he won the Auckland Plate, for the enthusiasm to reach a pitch never equalled at Ellerslie. When tho son of Finland went out to do his preliminary he was greeted with applause by the patrons of tho outside stand*, and when he won tho people ran riot. After weighing in ho was surrounded by an admiring crowd, and while bring rubbed down Mr. Lowry pulled some haira out of his tail and was literally mobbed by those round him, all anxious to secure a memento of the "Black Demon.*' Hundreds clamoured for "Just one hair, Mr. Lowry," but his attendant took him away, or Bobrikoff would have been without a tail, and a black boy would have had to bo engaged to keep tho flies off him in the summer time. When Bleriot, returned to scale after her great effort in thp Islington Handicap, it was noticed that she was walking a bit tender, and she was very sore when she cooled down. The trouble (says "Whalebone'") was in the knee which was cut at the A.R.C. Spring Meeting, and which gathered, and for a few days tho daughter of Soult was very lame. The gathering haa, however, burst, and Mr. Hall's crack filly is now on the road to recovery.

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THE TURF., Evening Post, Volume LXXXV, Issue 5, 7 January 1913

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1,389

THE TURF. Evening Post, Volume LXXXV, Issue 5, 7 January 1913

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