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PERSONAL MATTERS-

VICE-REGAL. This evening His Excellency tße Governor returns from Palmer«ton NoTth. Lord and Lady Islington ■ leave Wellington for Ckristahurch on Wednesday next, to be present at the Canterbury Jockey Club's races. Next day, Lord Islington will meet the leading < agriculturists in the evening, and on Friday, Bth Nbvember, Lord and Lady Islington attend the Canterbury Show. They atay in the South Island until the 11th inst., visiting also Timaru, Dunedin, and Invercatgillj arriving back in Wellingon Sunday, 17th November. The Professorial Board of the' Otago University College has nominated Mr. Frederick Fisher Miles for the Rhodes Scholarship. Mr. Milee has a, splendid scholastic record, and has taken a keen interest in the general life of tho University. News has been received of the death of Dr. William A. Reid, at the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, on Wednesday last. Tho deceased was the youngest son of Mr. W. S. Reid, of Wellington, formerly Solicitor-General, and was born thirtywven years ago-. Mr. W. T. Dundon, who is severing Ms connection with the Public Trust Office in order to take up sheepfarming, left' for Christchurch on Thursday. On the eve of his. departure Mr. Dundon, who was much esteemed by his fellowof&cers, was presented by toe staff with ft gladstone bag. , The statement taken from the report of the Napier' Competitions Society that Mr. Horace Hunt, of Wellington, has Jwen appointed judge of the instrumental music events at the society's next festival, is not correct. Mr. Hunt states ihat he wasjnvited to adjudicate, but declined, as he is not in sympathy with iki competitions movement. Mr. T. R. Hodder, president of the jManawatu Agricultural and Pastoral Association, was yesterday presented ■with an inscribed fountain pen by the united pressman at the Manawatu A. and P. Snow, as a token of their appreciation of his consideration for the needs of the pfese in reporting the show. There were twenty-five signatories to the list. Mr. Hodder replied with grateful acknowledgmente of the service of the press in advancing the work of ;the A. and P. Association. ' The death occurred in Wellington this taorning of Mrs. Newman, wife of Dr. A. K. Newman, member of Parliament £or Wellington East. The deceased lady .was a daughter of Dr. Featherston (onetime Superintendent of the Wellington Province), and she was well-known in Wellington and highly esteemed for her work in connection ytith various _ philanthropio bodies. This was especially so during her husband's term of office as Mayor of Wellington. The funeral service will be held at St. Paul's ProCathedral on Monday. One of Wellington's first-born, in the person of Mr. John Edward Evans, died fast evening, aged sixty-nine. He was a well-known tradesman in this city, having been in business as a harnessmaker Bine& 1862, when at the age of nineteen he succeeded his father. The late Mr. Evans was born in this city, his parents coming out in the ship Adelaide in 1840. It was not until 1851, however, that Mr. Evans's father was Eble to start his business as a saddler, ecause in those Very eauly days there wad but little or no scope for him. However, the foundations of the firm were laid in premises in / Willis-street, opposite to where the old office of the Evening Post stood. The business was carried on there for some years by the father, and fiubsequently the son, but the latter (removed to Lambton-quay in 1871, where lie continued to take the closest and most active interest in the firm until 1903, .when ilHiealth compelled him to retire. He received his education at Tinnimore's and Toomath's' schools, then weJl-kuown scholastic establishments. For , twentyfive years theJ-late Mr. J. E. Evans was a member of the Terrace School Committee, a work in which he was very- much interested. He is survived by his two sons — Messrs. I?. -J. Evans and H. M. •Evans— and one unmarried daughter, [who all reside in Wellington. ' Members. of the Legislative Council combined yesterday % afternoon to pay high tribute to the character and memory of Sir William Jukes Steward, who died at Island Bay on Thursday evening. The Leader of the Council (the Hon, H. D. Bell) moved— "That the Council records its high sense of the dis tinguished services rendered to the Dominion by the late Sir William Jukes Steward, Knight, a mernoer of the Legislative Council and former member and Speaker of the House of Representatives, and respectfully tedders to his widow and family ari assurance of its sincere sympathy with them in their bereave ment." Mr. Bell touched upon the late Sir _ William Steward's distinguished political services, the singular* courtesy in his manners, coupled with a sincere per sisteflce which made him endeared to all. The motion was seconded by the Hon. W. D. H. Baillie, and spoken to appreciatively by the Hons. W. C. F. Carncroas, C. H. Mills, T. Parata, and O. Samuel. The House of Representatives adjourned yesterday afternoon out of respect to the memory of the late member.. In speaking of him and hid iwork in Parliament, the Prime Minister remarked that he had never heard Sir sWiuiam speak a harsh or offensive word against his fellow-members. In the words of the Eastern poet, "Honour to his memory, peace to Bib ashes." After further speeches on the same lines, the House adjourned. The funeral will take place at Waimate on the afternoon of Monday next. In deference to the wish of relatives there will bo no military foriniJities when the body is taken to the ferry steamer to-night, but on arrival at Christchurch on Sunday morning a military escort will meet the train and place the casket in the mortuary van. ,Orl Monday morning the same escort .wiJl see the casket eotrained and will accompany it> the train to Waimate. At Waimate a gun carriage will be waiting to cortvey the coffin, which will be borne to the grave with the full military honours due to the late Sir WilHam in his rank as major.

A bottle containing a message was picked up at Waihere Bay, Pitt Island (one of the Chatham Islands), -on 25th September, 1912. The message was as follOwB: "This bottle was thrown overboard from B.s. Rernuera on hei maiden voyags to New Zealand in lat. ,49deff 41miu. S. and long. 129deg. 26nrih. E., on 3rd November, 1911" The finder was requested to forward message to a Wellington resident, with particulars as to whara aud when found. The bottle came ashore On a sandy beach — about the only one — on the west side of Pitt Island, all the lest of the coastline being very rocky. After a voyage of 326 days this bottle drifted ashore at Waihere Bay, lat. 44deg. 17min. S. and long. 176deg. 12min. W., a distance of 2250 miles, an average of about seven miles per day. Ihe snot on the ocean where the bottle was thrown overboard is about the same longitude as the boundary line between South Australia and Western Australia, bat nearly 1100 miles to the south of the Australian, coast, and therefore the bottle passed New Zealand on its voyage to Pitt Island. - Drapers are having a busy time with Warner's Rtufc-proof Corsets, bo great is the demand for this favourite corset.—

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19121102.2.25

Bibliographic details

PERSONAL MATTERS, Evening Post, Volume LXXXIV, Issue 108, 2 November 1912

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1,203

PERSONAL MATTERS Evening Post, Volume LXXXIV, Issue 108, 2 November 1912

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