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NOTES AND COMMENTS

(By Sir Bedivere.)

- The English-bred colt Valido, belonging /lo.Mr. G. D. Greenwood, is due to make j ftus appearance in the Gxanville Stakes ;<»t RoEehili this afternoon. Those -who j'lhave seen most of him tell me that he j can muster up a great burst of speed, iibut. that he is inclined to be flighty, and I 4s unlikely to be seen to advantage over "pfcher than comparatively short courses. Sea King, .who was due to contest the "(Winter Oats Handicap this afternoon, Mwas recently schooled over hurdles. He ;is said to have shown such a marked {disinclination for the business, however, HLhat his connections are nnlikely to •jaersevere with him in this direction. - A Southern "writer is xeeponsible for tithe statement that Mr. J. Buckley has 'presented the Birkenhead gelding "St. fAidan. to the jockey J. Beale, who has 'frequently worn Mr. Buckley's colours. The sub-committee set up by the Auckland Racing Club to go into the matter , of. next season's programmes is said to jiave recommended that the stakes be tahcreased to an extent which will place !fhe club, in the premier position in this riespect in the Dominion. Canterbury liwilJ have" to look to its laurels. a Owing to the Bemuera drainage works, ffraining operations are likely to be serjjonsly interfered with at Ellerslie this jfcpring. A large- sewer, says "Phaeton," ids- being laid ' across the racecourse, ticrittirig, up.lhe course proper below the f'Berby stand, and also the hurdle schoolling, track- and the steeplechase course : 'below; the stand double and the water I jump. The- tan, sand, middle grass, aad Ijthe1 jthe two-year-old tracks have been tun- ' ,'aielled. under. This, week about fifty men j Jihave been put off the job, which means j jibat the work is likely to drag on for | ieoine time to-come — a most unsatisfactory j whappening for trainers.' ! . Mr. W. Boulston, the owner of | 'Soultoria, was, in Auckland ou Tuesday ! \l3Bt, and - in, the - course of conversation ;-witb. the; Pukekohe sportsman " Phaeton " particulars anent -the f accent sensational removal of the. brown1 mare from Belmont. Soultoria is back at liner old«-home, and so far as can be seen Jshe came through ler severe trial with-. tout, any. marked ill-effects. The statetunent made, that Soultoria. had been * clipped turns out to be incorrect. She .still carries her heavy brown coat, and Vth» f£ct that the 'clippers v/ere not used titfOydoubt saved the mare from confcract"A" severe" chill as the • result of her turned- adrift without clothing "■wheTi the thieves got near to the danger F^sone at Kawhia. That more than one kpersou was concerned in itheact of breakring and entering at Belmont and the reLiuoval oi the mare solid evidence ifi Horthcornxngj -and certain facts go to fcupport tee theory/that there wefe three coocerned in tie affair. CONFEEENCE BUSINESS. . Tho New Zealand Turf is indeed; forSFiunate in having such an able supporter i.. at-dts Lead as Sir George Clifford, -whose i*de£eiminatioa to refrain from offering "£hi& services to- the' Dominio- in the -wider shield of politics cannot but be deplored. presidential address to members of pthe Racing Conference should be read •and re-read. Regarded as a general -xeAriew of the Turfs position, as an -expression of the Turfs ideals, and as *-. to the Turf's. 'enemies and critics, -4i> is plainly the statement of ,a master,* and i£s strength lies*lar§ely in the moderation of- its Take one instance of this. Sir George said -that "this average inhabitant of New Zealand, with its many •centres of population, cannot attend one_ itenth'of tme race meetings available to .*jthe Englishman, with his perfect system •loi trains, or to the dwellers in the principal Australian cities, -whose opportunities inecnr almost every •week." He "would. ''Jaave been equally accurate had he said, ■tan reference to Melbourne and Sydney siesidents, 'Vhose opportunities recur 'three and four times a -week"; this in view of the numerous pony and trobting- * meetings held in the neighbourhood q£ -jthbae cities. This i».» point that can*not be too strongly emphasised. It is /quite unreafionable to suggest that the number of our race meetings should be in accordance- with the size of *onr population. The real question to be is how many days' racing -can the average New Zealander attend. SSir George Clifford's address leaves *2oom, if I may venture to criticise it, tfor only one regret, namely, the lack of 'any reference therein, to the question ot j ■ ehort distance racing. In his advocacy 'of more weight-for-ago-events all sportsmen of the best type -will be with him, ibufc there are many people who ' could -have "wished him to specifically throw the : •weight of his opinion in favour of a general improvement in tie class of our ! .programmes. With few exceptions, these compare most "unfavourably with those .published in. other countries, and it is a -thousand! pities that the Hawkes Bay Club's proposal, to the effect that no three-year-old or -upwards should be -allowed to compete in any handicap -'wvenfc of a lees distance than, six furflongs, should have be*n negatived, ft :now remains for us to hope that the j jHawket- Bay Club and others that see ' f thf* folly of the undue encouragement ••afforded to tho {.printer will take the vfcull by tho horns and set a very neces«*ary example. That programmes could be substantially improved without prejadicing financial interests is certain, and once a few of the better dues of clubs set oat to increase the distances of the various events their example, in *ihe contingently-acquired knowledge that ictarn* are not thereby curtailed, will absnredly be followed. The most important business transacted at the conference this week was that in reference to the appointment of ■paid stewards. The stipendiary official has been a long time coming, but thanks largely to the persistent efforts of Messrs. R. H. Nolan, E. Goodbehere, A. W. Budge, Dr. Paget, and one or two other early advocates of the new system of .control, he is at length upon our threshold. There has been a suggestion to the effect that six months must elapse •ere the new buffers between ■wrongdoers ''and the racing pnblic can get to work, irat the reason for such a lengthy delay is not apparent. The positions will be 4iffir;iiU. to satisfactorily fill, for the qualifications therefor are both many and peculiar, and it is to be- hoped that the right men may be forthcoming. The success or failure of the system will entirely depend upon this. Such men as may be appointed? -will "Bad themselves in a most unenviable position, and It will be only due to them that all*who Lave -the best interests of the Turf at Jieart should accord them their active and amoral support. They are bound to make, enemies, and will have to enffer the jibes of all these who consistently imagine they note malpractice where malpractice is not. It is in- the knowledge of this and the hope that they may make as few euemies as possible that they .will -jenter upon their duties.

In having overcome the objection lodged on behalf of the Canterbury • Jockey Club, to its spring meeting being held upon 26th and 28th October, the Wellington Racing Club, together with its representatives. Alessrs J. W. Abbott and W. H. S. Moorhouse, is to be congratulated. The local public will thereby be enabled to enjoy an afternoon's racing on a holiday date, and the club's finauces should be benefited to an extent which will enable it to more quickly attain the enviable position which it will some day assuredly occupy. ' . - At length full account* are to hand ol Tagalie's defeat in the Oaks. It seems that during the morning of the race all cortfi of rumours were set about concerning her, it being freely stated that she was not to run. However, her ap.pearanee in the saddling paddock promptly belied such false statements, and she went out an odds-on favourite. Iv the preliminary she was a bit" on her toes, but she had e^tled down nicely ere the field lined up at the post, and everybody expected her to repeat her Derby performance. On this occasion, however, ehe did not leave the mark so smartly, and it was not until Tottenham Corner was negotiated that she took up the running. On heads being straightened for home, she looked all over a winner, but, to everybody's amazement, she collapsed utterly. Various suggestions were offered for her inglorious display — she finished no nearer than seventh — and the most reasonable of these appears to be that it was attrU butable to the changed nature of the going. Derby Day was fine, and the surface was fast, but on Oaks Day tho weather broke up badly. Early in. the forenoon rain set in, and it continued to come down in torrents throughout the hours of racing. The course thus became soaked, and the going was decidedly holding. The winner, Miraka, who was bred by the late Douglas Baird and sold as a foal, together with her dam, to M. Cheri Hulbroun for 4000 sovereigns, was the rankest of outeiders, it being practically a case of "write your own price." Nor was the runner-up, Equitable,' the least bit fancied. JOCKEY'S; RETURN TO CONSCIOUSNESS fax TKi.tnitATg— pjutas association.] CHRISTCHURCH, 19th July. W. Better, the jockey, 'who' was" injured' at Biccarton some time ago, and who has been unconscious at the hospital ever since, improved wonderfully yesterday, and had his first retnrn to con- ■ sciousness. He was able- to recognise a •relative. - •

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Bibliographic details

NOTES AND COMMENTS, Evening Post, Volume LXXXIV, Issue 18, 20 July 1912

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NOTES AND COMMENTS Evening Post, Volume LXXXIV, Issue 18, 20 July 1912

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