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THE TURF. NOTES AND COMMENTS.

(By Sir Bedivore.)

A letter was received by me last week j making mention of the death of Coast- i guard. Tho writer was unaware as to ' how it came about, but the old fellow, , who was in his twenty-first year, met his end on his owner's station, Ashcott, Hawkes Bay. There have been few if any better heavy-weight hunters in New Zealand than Coastguard, who, though possessing no great brilliancy, was an almost perfect fencer, and for so" big and sturdy a hortv a wonderfully good stayer. He was first seen under silk at the Hawkes Bay Winter Meeting in the season of 1595-6, when, with his owner, Mr. J. B. A'Deane^ up he finished unplaced in the Hunt Cup. So little was thought of his chance that he was entrusted on the tofcalisator with only four sovereigns, and it is interesting to "note that Mr. A'Deane was then able to ride at 11.0. The following year Coastguard won the Hawkes Bay Hunt Cup and a Maiden Steeplechase at the , old Hutt course, where on the next day he carried 13.0, and ran rccond to Rambler, thi3 after treating his owner to a toss, and being remounted. In 1897 he won the Hunt Cup at Riccarton, carrying Mr. R. Harley, and also took tho Trial and Farewell Steeplechases at Napier Park. Several events subsequently fell to him, and wound up his career at Riccarton •in 1901, where he ran third in the Hunt Cup, second to Straybird in the Beaufort Steeplechase, and unplaced in the Lincoln Steeplechase. , In ( whining the Winter Steeplechase by six lengths under ,12.3 Antarctic gave further evidence of his undoubted ability, and it will be rather interesting to note how Mr. Henrys deals with Mm and Corazon in connection with the Hawkes Bay race. The Press Association agent does not tell us whether Sol completed the course, but no mention being made of his liaving failed to do go. it can only be assumed that he did. This being so, it is perfectly evident that he was very far from being himself, and probably the fall he l^eceived in the Great Northern, coming on the top of a severe race in the Hurdles, knocked him out,. John's success in the Campbell Hurdle Race was well due. There \& no doubt the racing he is now getting through is improving him, and provided he remains sound he must be regarded as a dangerous candidate for any future event. Winiata appears to be an uncommonly emarfc hunter. When Sunstar won the Two Thousand he established a record by completing the mile course in lmin 37 3-5 sec. As I suspected, the critics were prompt to change their tune, and after his success at Newmarket he was at once referred to as a really highclass, colt. Such he must unquestion- , ably be, and hi view of his latest triumph there, can no longer be any fear that Sundridge's stock will not stay. Sundridge, who was under offer to Mr. Lan Duncan, proprietor of . the Walkanae Stud, about five years ago, for £4000, and was recently sold for something like £25,000 to a French breeder. He gained a reputation on 1 the turf as a brilliant sprinter. *!Had he not been affected in the wind, however, it is almost a certainty he would have shown to advantage over lengthy as well as short courses. His slock are said to be exceptionally fine-looking horses, with the best of legs and feet and excellent 'manners. 'What a pity Mr. Duncan did not secure him ! ' He is a direct descendant,, through Speculum, of Golopin's sire, Vedette, ancj it is interesting icy note that whilst his pedigree discloses inbreeding to Newnrmster and Stockwell, it is entirely free from St. Simon blood. By all accounts New Zealand owners are preparing to invade Australia next spring as they have never- invaded it before. Mr. Greenwood will probably send Peirene, Vice-Admiral, Formeden, and a couple of two-year-olds, across the water. Messrs. W; G. and G. L. Stead intend being represented by Sunburnt, Culjjrit, Bandiera, and one or tw;o of Boniform's first progeny. Mr. Lowry will have Bobrikon to carry his colours, and other New Zealand horses that will probably be at Randwick next spring are Bridge, Gold Thread, Obsono, Gunboat, Tumut, Zealand, Silver Bullet, and Soultiform. ' Outlander was given a trial over the schooling hurdles last week, and, with his trainer ; 'F. Holmes, in the saddle, he shaped fairly well. A Southern writer states that the la«t has probably been seen of Formless on the turf, and that her owner* pre*"nt intention is to mate her with Varco ne A xt season. The Hawkes Bay Jockey Club received a fine entry in connection with it* Winter Meeting. The Steeplechase field includes Te Aral, Corazon, Antarctic, Lovell, Lord Fyne, and Dorando, and among those nominated for the Hawkes Bay Hurdles aro Paisano, Wimmera, WhakaWeira, Continuance, Appiu, St. Aidan, Nogi, 'Tina Toa, and Waiputero. Wirral claims an engagement in the Havelock Hack Steeplechase, and tho two southerners, Stay Boy and Dorando, are entered for moro than one of the cross-country events. St. Aidan, who recently showed excellent form on the flat, should make a most capable hurdler. Another novice of the right stamp that will probably be seen out over the battens is Cullinan. Bollin is also engaged in the minor hurdlo races. • In writing of El Dorado's withdrawal from his EllersHfl engagements. "Spectator" says that the came was duo to the reappearance of an old troublo. This news, coupled with the fact that the gelding has not been nominated for the Hawkes Bay Steeplechase, points to his reappearances this season being extremely problematical. An attempt was recently mnde to get Prophet, who injured himself whilst racing over hurdles at tho Ellerslie Summer Meeting, back into shape. Last Wednesday, however, the horse again showed signs of being seriously 'amiss, and it is moTe than probable "that his racing days aro over. When Mushroom won the March Stakes at Newmarket under weight-for-j age, he ran in the easiest of winners after completing the mile and a quarter course in the record time' of 2min 3sec. Private watches made the time slightly less than this, and when one considers that the colt was never fully extended, and thatthe course is uphill rather thnn down, his performance- appears to have been a remarkable one. Unfortunately this colt, who was originally purchased as a yearling for 90 guineas, was not entered for either of the classic eA'eilts. and his only important engagements aro in the Biennial Stakes of 1000 nova at Ascot, Midsummer Stakes of 500 soys, and the Limekiln Stakes of 10 soys enrh and 600 "soys added at Newmarket. It in practically certain, therefore, that he ana Sunstar will act meet. ~ i

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THE TURF. NOTES AND COMMENTS., Evening Post, Volume LXXXI, Issue 134, 8 June 1911

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THE TURF. NOTES AND COMMENTS. Evening Post, Volume LXXXI, Issue 134, 8 June 1911

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