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LAWN TENNIS.

CBr "Huka.") Some few enthusiasts quito expected that the Wellington team would give Thorndon a fair run last Saturday, but the game was an easy win for the latter's team. The Thorndon courts are looking better than they have done for years, and, except in one or two spots, played true. Salmond gave Didsbury a bad beating, the latter only getting one game in each set. Salmond was very safe, whereas his opponent, although sending down a fine service, with a lot of "kick," was too reckless for one not in form. Smythe played really well against Wilson, only allowing the Wellington player a game in each set. Wilson, struggled hard, but could not reach the winning stage. What a change came over matters when the aforementioned four players met in the doubles. Salmond and Wilson could not get going at all. Salmond's back-hand was all astray, and when shots did go up to the net they were lobbed over. Smythe lobbed well at times, and Didsbury assisted with some good overhead work, but was weak off the ground. The losers tried hard to get away with the second set, but their combination was at fault. Swanston beat Fisher in a three-set go. Tho Wellington provincial champion took the first set fairly easily, and looked to have the second one also, but Fisher, who has been having a lot of practice of late, by clever tactics won out at 6—5.6 — 5. Swanston made* "no race" of the last set. He worked cleverly from the base line, and Fisher was often caught out of position at the half court. Why Fisher will persist in taking i>p a position which he must know is wrong puzzles onlookers. He failed time after time with his half volley, and after all, when he did get the shot, it was only a defensive one. Fisher gets well away with his service, and appears as though he would be at the net ready to kill. But, no— stop he will, at that tatal spot, even when he has plenty of time to get three yards further. Swanston was pumping some good hard passing shots down on either hand, yet at times, when he had to move for tbs shot, cramped his drive by dragging nis elbow into his side v \ Brown started out with plenty of paca and accuracy against Peacock, and titton ished onlookers and his opponent by soon leading, s—l.5 — 1. Peacock had been erratic, but settled down to oave what looked a good thing for the Wellington player. The latter eased a shade— tatal mistake — Peacock crept up, taking game after game with steady perseverance. Brown's accuracy faded clean out cf *sight, and so did his chance of winning. Peacock evened, and won at 6—5.6 — 5. Peacock played even better in tho second set; in tact, he continued his run, and it was only after he had taken seven games in succession that Brown's turn 'came. He worked hard, but his timing was at fault, and, besides, he fed his opponent's back hand, and on the day Peacock was strong there. Peacock appears to have lost his fine forehand drive, possibly through giving too much attention to his backhand. borne of his back-hand shots on Saturday yore clinkers. The double should have been a good exhibition, but it was a mixture of "poor stuff and sudden splashes of brilliancy. When the latter did appear, one would sit up, saying : "Now they have got going," but almost at once a change would oome over the scene. It was really carelessness or a free and easy "don't-care-who-wins" attitude oh the part of the players. Peacock woke ud now and again, and buried the opposition with some hurricane* smashes,. Thorndon took the first set, and had the second one also, but Swanston was caught napping at the net, and Fisher — wily general — spotted his chance, and made it set all. The third set dragged, Swanston and Peacock not working well together. Mistakes on both sides were as thick as the grass under foot. Fisher and Brown were now playing more carefully. Fisher scented a win, and reached the all but position while the other pair dallied. Then an effort was made, but, alas ! too late — Wellington won the deciding set, 6—4.6 — 4. To be absolutely candid, the tennis was poor, considering who the players wero, and one could not help thinking what a drubbing a pair like Dickie and Wallace would have given either combination had they met it last Saturday. It perhaps was a pity that the double had not been played before the result of the competition was actually decided. Thorndon, no matter how the doublo went, had won the match; so possibly neither side cared much. Brougham Hill, with a weak side — Laishley and Albert Howe boing absent — beat Wellington's second team easily. Harry Howe was victorious, with something to spare, over Eller, although the latter was playing well towards the end. Hunter took the iirst set from Jeffrey easily, but had to go all the way to win the second at 6—5.6 — 5. Sampson and Dart both had good wins from Salek and Grant respectively. The doubles went to Wellington, Eller and Jeffrey putting up a splendid performance against Howe and Hunter. Sampson and Dart took their first set, 6—3,6 — 3, but lost the second after "5 all" bieing called, and then were beaten a "love" set. Victoria College beat Muritai. Jones again won hia single, beating Cleghorn two Bets to one. The losers took the first, but Jones, going strongly, won tho next two — both at 5—3. Wright and Jones also took their double against Cleghorn and Smith. Wilson put Nagle down easily, and Beere treated Wright likewise. Smith had an easy win from Lewis. The latter appears to be under a cloud so far this season. Nagle and Lewis gave Wilson and Beero a close call in the firrt set of tho doubles, but, after losing 6—5, faded away in the second set. PAROCHIAL "VOLLEY." "Huka's" remarks last week have drawn from "Volley," a Canterbury writer, an admission that he admires the writer's interest in the game, but he is concerned that hia idol has "that shocking parochial feeling so prevalent in Wellington." "Volley" wanders from the point that ono would like to hear him at. Did or did not Canterbury suggest to Otago that tho latter association should vote for the Davis Cup contest to be played in Christchurch in return for Canterbury's vote that the New Zealand championships should beplayed in Dunedin? If that wero done, what objection oan any one have to it being commented upon? Who is more parochial than "Volley?" and, who is more ready to condemn in others what must only be good form in himself? NEW ZEALAND CHAMPIONSHIP. All is now settled for the Ne«- Zealand championships, which take place in Blenheim at Christmas time. The entry forms should be on' issue by Monday, and the Blenheim enthusiasts are working hard to make, the meeting a <-uccess. A handsome trophy has been presentecTby F. H. Ayres, Ltd., for the ladies' singles. It has to bo won twice in succession or three times at intervals. Besides the usual gold medals, winners will receive trophies to the value of £2 2s each. The Marlborough meeting follows the Now Zealand one. a.nd every inducement will be made by hospitable Blenheim to attract players for the Marlborough meeting. FLYING WILDING. The latest regarding A. F. Wilding is that he proposes to start on a perilous j and adventurous motor-bicycle trip across Europe to Constantinople, a trip from which all his friends are trying to tlis* suade him. Wilding wrote to a friend at Sapicourt, where a tournament was to tak© place — "Am frightfully anxious to fly. Would go any distance and play auy amount of tennis to have a fly." Arrangements were made, and Wilding left Brussels on his big motor-bicycle. The next thing that was heard was that "un Australien, grand et blond" had arrived at the chateau, utterly exhausted, on his motor bicycle, after getting lost in the woods, and going half-way on the wrong road to Paris But Wilding beat Gormot 6—o,6 — 0, 6—l,6 — 1, 6—l,6 — 1, and next day met Froitzheim. The latter is the German champion. During the last four years each player has beaten tho other four times. Wilding ,won the first enfc 6—o,6 — 0, and led 4—l in the second. Then tho Gorman obtained complete mastery over the ball, and, with splendid passing . drives down, the side lines, beautiful proes-

court 'shots, and accurate lobs, took the set 6—4.6 — 4. But Wilding became niost aggresnive in tho third 6et, and romped home 6—l. After all tho tennis, Wilding was 'up at 5 o'clock next morning, ami motored out to the flying grounds at Mourmelon, near Chalons. Thcro he was taken tor a five-mile spin in an aeroplane, but afterwards admitted that ho felt "very queer, and his heart camo up to his mouth." when tho motor of the aeroplane suddenly stopped at a height of a. few hundred yards, and they came down with awful suddenness. Luckily tho motor started again just before the aeroplane reached the ground. Wilding did not conceal the fact that He had closed his eyes and considered himself a "gonar." Ho would nob cay what he had thought at tho time, but said he wasn't a bit keen on flying any more. One way or another, he runs a certain amount of risk of getting hurt, as tho motor-bike trip to Constantinople had followed tho flying, noth withstanding the warning of his friends that he would run it risk in the Balkans, or be kidnapped by some Transylvanian princess. Pockley, of Sydney, partnered Wilding in lha doubles at the Terretet 'meeting. They beat Germot and Anceau 7—5,7 — 5, B— 4, 6—4. Tho Frenchmen led 4—o in both the first -two sets. Someone bet Wilding five louis ' that he would not win the second set. This put him on his mettle, and he gave a positively dazzling exhibition of the game. "Buck up, Pock !" he cried, and with such good results that they won tho six games in quick succession, and _ the set, not to mention those five "luigis." In the singles at the Terretet meeting, Pockley beat Anceau 7—5, 6—4.6 — 4. Then Wilding defeated tho winner 6—l, 6^-3, and in the final played all over Germot 6—l,6 — 1, 6—3.6 — 3. MAX DECUGIS AT BRUSSELS. The French champion, Max Decugis, who had beaten .Wilding twice at Wiesbaden, while in May and June Wilding had also been twice victorious over his adversary, met Wilding at the second Brussels championships. The two camo together in the final. Wilding attacked vigorously from the start, led 4—o, and won the set at 6—3. Ho also took the second set at 6—o. In the , third he led 3—o,3 — 0, but suddenly the Frenchman, by splendid placing, took game after game, and led 4—3. Then Wilding, with a great spurt, led 5—4, 40 — 15— only wanting an ace for mateh — but his opponent stuck to him, and, getting a lead, won . the set at 7—5. The loss upset Wilding, and he dropped the fourth set 6—o. He went for a vigorous attack in the fifth »et, but Decugis continually passed him, and, serving magnificontly, despite sonio fine cross-court volleying by Wilding, won again a "love" set and match. It was sheer pluck that gave Decugis the match. ' DOUST*S RETURN. Stan Dousfc intends to leave Australia early next year on another tennis trip. iie hopes to be in England in April, and will compete at Wimbledon for the AllEngland championship. On his way to the Old Country he may also visit South Africa, and play in the championships there. The following tennis tournaments have been approved by the New Zealand Association : — Pahiatua Championships. — 2nd and 3rd January, at Pahiatua. Wellington Championships.— 2lst, 23rd, and 24th January, at Masterton. ■ Taranaki Championships.— 26th, 27th, and 28th January, at New Plymouth. Hastings Tournament. — 261h, 27th, and 28th Dece"mber, at Hastings. Hawkes Bay Championships. — 31st Decomber, 2nd and 3rd January, at Napier. Rangitikei Championships.— 26th and 27th December, at Marton. Marlborough Championships. — 29th, 30th, 31st December, 2nd January, at Blenheim. Taranaki v. Auckland. — 18th February, at New Plymouth. For Children's Hacking Cough at night. Woods', Great Peppermint Cure. Is 6d and ?J3 6d.—^dvt.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19101119.2.166

Bibliographic details

LAWN TENNIS., Evening Post, Volume LXXX, Issue 122, 19 November 1910

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LAWN TENNIS. Evening Post, Volume LXXX, Issue 122, 19 November 1910

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