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LAWN TENNIS.

fßv "Huka.") The amendments to the inter-club competitions as suggested by the Management Committee of the Wellington Association have been carried, and will now be quickly brought into force. Clubs are now settling down in grim earnest to get their best teams in the field. Some of tho clubs consider that the ladies' and mon's teani6 belonging to the same club should be allotted courts together, whoreon to decide their respective matches. Otherwise, they argue, tho social enjoyment ifa to a great extant dono away with. Some ol the mon'a toams, of course, only consider their own matches, and tako little or no interest in tho doings of their Indies. Thoro is no uso working up the pros and cons o[ this mat tar, us nothing can bb dono to eotllo it in any satisfactory niunncr to itllcomors until Iho association has ground* of its own, with sufficient courts to piny tho greater bulk of ita matches, or at tho loast to rcliove tho pressure upon tho club's courts. But as matters stand, tennis players — tho mon in particular — should • always romomber that it is simply n gamo after all, and not a lifo and death matter. Therefore there should bo sufficient ffivo and take on both sidoa to enable tho most enjoyment to bo obtnined from what is necessarily a somewhat cramped position. Tlie Thorndon Club should bo ablo to put a strong team in to defond the "shiold," but as usual it will be hotly pressed by tho Wellington team. The other club's will not be in tho running, but they should' havo a hot battle for the third place. Tho Day's Bay courts will ba used again as last year, and it is the intention of tho owners to do their beet to keep the courts in good condition. Without the courts at the Bay, very tow players would have the opportunity of playing on grass, and there is no doubt the game is a more enjoyable one on graas than oa the asphalt during the hot vraathor N.Z. ASSOCIATION'S ANNUAL MEETING. The twenty-fourth annual meeting of the Now Zealand Association will take place on 14th October. Tho chief matters on the order-paper to interest delegates will be the propoeed amendment o£ the voting powers of associations. This was a matter suggested some time back by the lato hon. secretary, who found that some associations had grown to such an extent that a redrafting of the representation rulo was necessary. For instance, when the association was reorganised in 1903, Canterbury had eight clubs, with 490 members, but by 1907, it had practically .doubled its clubs and members. Yet it had not increased its votes. The time was then ripe for a readjustment, but. associations had no reason then to value votes of delegates to any great extent, and tho matter was not taken very seriously. . Consequently, the mover not securing the necessary assistance to carry his idea, had to accept tho decision "that the rule stand unaltered." What a chance some associations lost then, and what chance have they of securing an alteration now ! Old associations, except Nelson, can claim five votes, as they . all have over 250 members. Is it likely that the smaller associations, who have, [ by the existing rule, as much power as j their bigger brothers, will agree to a I loss of voting power? Southland, West Coast, Marlborough, Wanganui, Taranaki, and Hawkes Bay have, say, an aggregate of 3000 affiliated players, and their - voting strength can be 50 votes, whereas the larger associations — Auckland, Wellington, Canterbury, and Otago — with 6000 players, can only muster 20 votes, that is from delegates. If it comes to fight at the annual meeting, the smaller , associations, even if they do not claim an increase from their last year's votes, • would still be ahead by two votes — if there is no split in their camp. Taking last year's list of members of each association, and if tho future is to be provided for, then the rule should bo altered to read, somewhat as follows: — "Each association shall be entitled to one vote, and an additional vote for every 600 players after the first 300." That would mean Wellington about 4 votes, Canterbury 3, Auckland and Otago 2 each, and the other seven associations 1 each. Tf this were done it would forco the associations to rake in all the clubs they could so as to obtain a high membership — as it would mean votes. Taranaki, Hawkes Bay, and Wanganui would soon find the extra clubs to give them ' another veto. Otago, and Auckland, with ; a little extra push, would bring their membership up to 1500 each, so as to secure threo votes. Canterbury would have to work hard to get to 2100, and likewise Wellington to make its total 2700, thereby securing an extra vote. But it would all tend to getting tho now unaffiliated clubs j to join their respective associations. I The other pomt — the paid secretary — i is a matter that tho writer will not touch i upon at present to anjr extent, but in < other countries associations acquire re- j venuo for several purposes by making a charge upon all tournaments held during the year. For example, promoters of tournaments have to pay the governing ! associations 6d per head for each competi- j tor in each event. Of course, the com- ' petitor pays the sum, but as the entrance ! fee is 2s 6d, he or she pays it, or does not enter. The Australasian Association requires associations running the Australasian championships to set aside a portion of the entrance fees for it. A matter that does noc appear on the order paper for the meeting, but should have the attention of delegates — they will get their chance when the report is under consideration — is why has the balancesheet_ of the New Zealand championship meeting been hung up from last January until now ? Whose fault is it ? And is it a fact that the agreement entered into by the Auckland and New Zealand Associations was broken by the former body? Who paid for the club pavilion built on tho Eden and Epsom grounds? Did the takings at the gates and grandstands agree with the tickets as returned by the Auckland body? What price did the Auckland Association get for the Auckland programme, and what for the New Zealand one? What is the latest detail in connection with the championship meeting, and what is the latest reply from the auditor of the New Zealand Association on that matter? Tho whol« matter should be carefully looked into by delegates; if they have tho interests of the sport at heart, they will probe this business to the bottom. A special committee of enquhy is absolutely necessary — the auditor of the New Zealand Association has not passed balance-sheet of the New Zealand championship meeting as sent in by the Auckland Association, and pressure should be applied until a satisfactory explanation is forthcoming. Enough at present, but the writer will return to the oharge after the 14th "mat., with something stronger in connection with this matter. THE NEW SOUTH WALES DEADLOCK. The New South Wales Association has settled its troubles at a conference, and it is expected that when delegates meet at the special meeting there will be a peaceful settlement. The whole trouble arose over Sunday tennis, and as that matter has been shelved until next January, there wilj be time for both sides to consider if it is worth while breaking up their grounds over. All parties are pledged to use their influence to keep tho question back until next year, and if the rule which provides for a six months' prohibition against reopening any defeated question, a hasty vote is not likely to be risked. AMERICAN TENNIS. Ilackett and Alexander, the holders of the doubles championship of America beat Wrenn and Lamed in the Seabright tournament doubles, 6—3, 3—6, 9 7, 6—2 and thus won the championship. ' ' Little and Karl Behr went down in the semi-final to tho champions — Hackett and Alexander. The latter pair won the first set 6—l, and led 5—2 in the second, but the Little-Behr combination came away with a late dash, and snatched the set at 10— 4 J. But the holders went out after the third set with great dash, and won at 6—2. Alexander was all over the court like a will-o-the-wisp, making marvellous returns and almost impossible volleys. Behr at times was sensationally brilliant— at other* disappointingly weak, eapeojilly overbo&cL

11. L. DOHERTY. 11. L. Doherty has appeared in singles agnin in England, and captured the North of England championship by beating F. G. Lowe in the final 6—3, 6—2, 6—2.6 — 2. By this win Doherly takes the cup outright. A. 11. Lowe, who was chosen for the Davis Cup team, was beaten by his brother (who met Doherty in final) in tho fourth round 6—4,6 — 4, 6—2.6 — 2. "Davis Cup" Lowe does not seem to be able to beat his brother, as when they met at Queen's the result was similar. Anyhow, they now intend to follow the example of other distinguished pairs of brothers in the lawn tennis world, and thus avoid fratricidal warfare, should the luck of the draw bring them together, which means one will give the other a walk-over. COLONIALS IN ENGLAND. Stan Doust went down to Dixon 6—3, 6—46 — 4 in Iho third round, at Folkestone, for the Cinque Ports championship. Dixon beat Mavrogordato 6—2, 6—2, B—lo. 6—4 in the final. In the doubles Doust and Mavrogordato beat Dixon and Prebble in the fimil 6—3, 10—8. Doust and Mrs. Armstrong were beaten in the iourth round of the combined by Prebblo and Miss Boothy, who ultimately won tho event.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19101008.2.112

Bibliographic details

Evening Post, Evening Post, Volume LXXX, Issue 86, 8 October 1910

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1,629

LAWN TENNIS. Evening Post, Volume LXXX, Issue 86, 8 October 1910

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