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MIMES AND MUSIC.

fßr OnrHEUS.I COMING EVENTS. OPERA HOUSE. William Anderson, in season to 19th November. J. C. Williamson's Julius Knight Comparty, 22nd November to flth December. U. Branseotube, 10th to 18th December. J. C. Williamson's "Flag Lieutenant" Company, 2Cth December to 15th January. J. C. 'Williamson's "King of Cadonia" Company, 29th January to 19th Febiuary. TUEATHE KOYAU Fullers* rictures, in season. HIS MAJESTY'S THEATRE. Koyal rictuio Syndicate, in seuton. Mr. Edmoiid T. Sayers, at one timo one of Wellington's most, prominent amateur actors, and who for many year:' part has been touring in England and. ■South Africa as principal comedian, with musical comedy companies, has, for the present at any rate, torsaken the boards. At latest, Mr. Sayers was press representative at Dominion Park, Montreal, and .report says that by his appearance it seems as if the gods of fortuno have smiled benignly on "Tommy." Mr. Nelsbn Illingworth, the wellknown sculptor, has just finished a striking medallion of Mr. Hugh J. Ward. It is a_ faithful portrait of the popular comedian, and is a fine testimonial of Mr. Illingworth's art. Mr. Illingworth is engaged on two other medallions of Mr. Ward. LilJi Lehmann was born 61 years ago, but. thanks to her correct use of her vocal organs, she is still able to 'delight opera-goers. A few weeks ago (according to an exchange) she appeared in Berlin as the heroine of Beethoven's "Fidelio," a most trying role, and aroused much enthusiasm. Miss Beatrice Day, the leading lady with J. C. Williamson's Julius Knight Company, has had a varied experience. Commencing in small parts with Sir Beerbohm Tree, Miss Day, after a five years' engagement with that manager, essayed several enterprises on her own account. Returning to the Haymarket Theatre, London, with the Tree management, Miss Day played many^of the leading roleS in several of ''"the big successes chronicled at this- theatre. At the conclusion of this contract, an American starring tour followed, on the ["termination of which Miss Day returned • to London, and was engaged by the late Sir Henry Irving, with whom she played important parts, until the famous manager's demise. Going to South Africa in partnership with the late Herbert Flemming, and afterwards coming on to Australasia, Miss Day's performances will bo well remembered. The Theatre Royal, Dumfries, built in 1792, having been condemned by the sanitary authorities, has been sold by auction for £500 to a mercantile firm, says a recent issue of the London Chronicle. The poet Burns was one of its earliest habitues, and recited on its stage. In the old days of the Caledonian Hunt, when Dumfries had a large body of resident gentry, it was a fashionable meeting place, and regarded as one of the best bijou theatres in the Kingdom. The elder Kean and Macready here first attained reputation, as also did Brooke, after whom the neighbouring street was named. A syndicate is being formed to build n new theatre. "The Cheat," which will be seen in New Zealand shortly, is being received at the Theatre Royal (Sydney) with considerable enthusiasm, and deservedly co (says the Sydney Mail), for the drama is well constructed, and contains a wealth of incident, which holds the attention of the audience from "Start to finish. The story is a military one, in which there aro many thrilling events, and unexpected ' developments. Th^-* heroine (Ethel Hardy), impersonated by Miss Ethel Warwick, has good chances to display her artistic skill) and she gets all the emotional and sympathetic acting iuto her role that is possible. Miss Dorothy Grimston appears as Joan Fielding with success, and Miss Nellie Calvin and Miss Maud WingQeld capitally sustain the minor characters of Marjorie Voriand and the Widow Van- | start respectively. Mr. G. S. TitherI adge, as General Blanchard, invests his part with a striking personality. Mr. Thomas^ Kingston, as Captain James 'Blandhard, makes a popular hero in his difficult part," especially when uniformed as a Highlander, in the hands of the enemy. Mr. Harry Plimmer, as Stephen Blanchard, played admirably, find ie particularly graphic in his description of the tortures he has been subjected to while in the hands of the enemy as a prisoner of war. Mr. • Turner makes the best of his task as Dr. Voriand Mr. Cyril Mackay, as the cunning Captain Rivers, who lays several schemes for his own purpose with disastrous results to others, plays the part eplendidly, and caps his work with a tragical suicide. Mr. Boyd Irwin deserves praise as Mahomet Klian. ' The other characters are well sustained. The scenic arrangements are very fine. Mr. Henry Bracy has returned to Sydney to direct the production of "A Country Girl," and thus resumes a career as stage-director which has been frequently interrupted during his long seivice with the J. C. Williamson management by the superintendence, of concert ventures, such as the tours of lime. Albani and Mine. Ada Crossley. There is, probably, no member of the theatrij cal profession better known than ~Mr. I Bracy from one end of Australasia to the other. His London debut at the Gaiety Theatre dates back to 1870, and three years later he was principal tenor in ' 11. J. Leslie's opera-bouff o company at the London Opera Comique. He first visited this country at the end of 1873, under Harwood's management, became stage-manager and tenor of Lister's. Opera Company, and did not return to J/Ondon until 1879, after he had toured in the United States. During the ensuing ten years Mr. Bracy sang the tenor part *in "Mmc. Favart" at the Stiand (450 nights), created, Frittelini at the Comedy Theatre in "La Mascotte," and Hilarion in "Princess Ida," at the Savoy, and was in other ways prominent until his return to Australia. At the end of a long tour with an opera company of his own, Mr. Bracy joined Mr. J. (J. Williamson, under whose banner, with a few important intervals, he has remained ever since. On Monday, 22nd inst., J. C. Williamson will commence a sixteen nights' season of romantic and pictuYesque drama at the Opera House. Mr. Julius Knight and Mips Beatrice Day will be the leading artists, and will be supported by seventy members of J. C. Williamson's principal dramatic organisation. "The Breed of the Treshams," a very powerful play of the period of the seventeenth century, will be the initial production. Of a recent performance of "The Breed of the Treshams," in which Mr. Julius Knight appears as Reresby, "The Rat," the Auckland Star says : — "Mr. Julius Knight has added another success to his repertoire, and has further enhanced his reputation in his representation of Lieutenant Reresby. It is essentially a star part ; for Reresby the sympathy of the audience is at once enlisted j on Rerasby the limeligrft is perpetually turned. In the intensity of his acting, when describing to young Tresham how their unnatural" father mined Uie young girl he loved, in the suffering of the torture scene, in the simulation of drunkenness to delay the mutineers from discovering Margaret's hiding place till help arrives and in the dramatic fight that follows — there is a most astonishing fall down a flight of stairs in this ncene — he attains a high level of 'artistry that we, unfortunately, rarely see equalled here. ' ' Mr. Ford 'Walthani, the basso and

talented artist with "The Scarlet Troubadours,"' has had a most interesting career upon the stage. Shidying foxthree years at the Royal Academy of Music, London, under Professor Arthur Thompson, Mr. Waltham succeeded in gaining medals for elocution and singing. l''ellow students of his were Mr. Frederic Ranalow (who recently loured Australasia with Madame Melba), Mr. Arthur Appleby (of J. C. Williamson's "King of Cadonia" Company), Mr. Whitworth Mitton (wlio toured Australia with Miss Elizabeth Purkina a few years ago), and ilr. Haigh Jackson, a former member Oi Mr. J. C. Williamson's companies. Since leaving the- Royal .Academy Mr. Waltham has appeared on the conceit platfoim with many celebrated singers, including Madame Patti, Esther Palliser, Fanny Moody, Zelia de Luss&n, Belle Cole, Ada Oosslev, Edward Lloyd, Lloyd Chandos, Santley,. Watkin Mills, Charles Manners, Andrew Black, Plunket Greene, etc Mr. YSJaltKam has appeared in musical comedy and pantomime, also in grand -opera, recitals of "Faust," "Romeo and Juliet," "Philemon et Bancio," "Berlioz's "Faust," "Fra Diavolo,' ! "Don Giovanne," "Carmen" and "Martha," and in various works, including Sullivan's "Golden Legend," Hanford's "Requiem" (first appearance' in London), Bennett's "May Queen," Liza Lehmann's "In a Persian Garden," and "The Daisy Chain" and | Lano Wilson's "Flora's Holiday." For' three years v Mr. Waltham was the basso with the London Meister Glee Singers, and 5 toured England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales on many occasions, also visitin £ Canada with this combination under Mr. Branscombe's direction. Mr. Waltham was a. member of the first Costume Comedy Company- in London, "The Musketeers" (a burlesque on Dumas's lhree Musketeers"), and played a season at the Tivoli and Oxford Theatres. One of the most amusing animal performances which has been seen in London was introduced at the Empire Jheatre last month. It is given by Barnold s dog and monkey actors, and ai S m- d ? a PP ro Priately enough, "A Hot Time m Dogville." The principal character is Dan, <r the intoxicalist canine, who spends his time- seeking frequent refreshment at a saloon bar, each time- emerging with increased unsteadiness of, gait. Meanwhile some of the other inhabitants of Dbgville make their appearance. One of the most striking features is a dog in Directoire costume and large picture hat. Incidentally a canine maiden leaves an upper room by ladder, and escapes with* her lover. All tins time Dan has been getting himself into a somewhat helpless condition. #$# «t es , says to de P arfc > to the tune pf We Won't Go Home Till Morning " but ;oon collapses. Then he staggers to a lamppost, the support of which he seems loth to abandon. At this moment an officious monkey in policeman's uniform interferes; he sounds an alarm tor a wagon, and Dan is quickly speeding away to the station. The' animals go through their performance entirely unaided. " J Carter, the magician, who has recently been in America, was due to open another Australian tour in Brisbane last Saturday. The Queensland tour will continue until the 30th, Melbourne will be visited in April, 1910, and New Zealand will follow. Mr. Harry Lyons will act as louring manager. Mr. 'Majiheson Lang and his wife, Miss Hutm Britton, will shortly visit Australia,, under tho management of Uarke, Meynell, and Gunn, the opening production being Hall Came and L. V. Parker's dramatisation of the former's novel, "The Manxman," which is en- *?? T e , to '" , Mr - Lan ? is the ot the title role, in which he- made an enormous success at the London Lyceum ; and Miss Britton was also ihV original of the part of Kate Cregeen. Both artists have achieved their greatest successes in "Pete," "The Christian," Hamlet," and "The Prisoner of tho Bastille."— a sufficient indication of (heir versatility. They will be supported out here by a specially selected company. Mr. Lang and his wife are intimate persona] friends of Mr. Oscar Asche and Miss Lily Brayton and it was to some extent owing to their suggestion that Mr. Lang and Miss Brutin consented to forego their important London engagements and visit tho country where Mr. Asche is meeting with such success. Miss Amy Castles, the Australian soprano, has met with manj extraordinary demonstrations of approval during her present Australian tour ; but not one will exceed in enthusiasm the welcome that is being prepared for her at the httle town of Kyabram, in Victoria,, writes a correspondent. Only quite recently it was decided that Miss Lastles should give the inhabitants of the httle place the opportunity of hearing her in the local hall, and Kyabram immediately evinced its pleasure at this information in a, most thorough and practical fashion.\ Its first act was to book every seat made available by Messrs. J. and N. Tait, under whose direction Miss Castles is appearing in the Commonwealth ; and its next move was/to make elaborate and secrel plans .for a fitting reception to the youii<* singer. It is now understood that the reception is to be of a mosfc gratifying kind, and will include some form of public presentation in token of the esteem m which Miss Castles is held. Herold Basset, who managed the tour of Madame Blanche Arral through New Zealand, makes complimentary reference to Wellington's Town Hall in a September issue of Musical America. Ho says : —"Wellington is the only town which boasts of a town hall of any size m New Zealand. It is a magnificent auditorium, whose acoustic properties are excellent. It has the reputation of being the finest hall south of the line. And the Wellingtonians are there to fill it when a great attraction comes along." The writer goes on to say that Australasia is the Mecca of the concert rrtist. Every town of importance has its 'town hall,' where the principal musical attractions are held, and they have every reason to be prond of the magnificent halls which they hays elected in Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and Wellington. . „ Per capita the Australian public is probably the great--m fes,c s , u P,P° rtel ' of music in the world.. The halls of the larger cities will hold from 3000 to 4000 peopW, and it is no unusual sight to see them crowded to thf doors on the occasion of some great artist's appeamnce. These cities are only four m number in Australia— that is, where large audiences can be expected — the three above mentioned, with Perth, and Wellington and Christchurch, in New Zealand. The other cities are of very Jittle importance, and yield very light returns except for one-night appearances ; in the latter case small ' towns will turn out an audience of surprising proportions." Mr. Bassett is arranging an American tour for Blanche Arral . Theatrical clips : — Mr. W. Percy plays the late George Lauri's ' .part, Barry, in the revival of "The Country Girl" in Sydney. ... Miss Rosina Buckmann, the brilliant concert soprano, ' is joining the Williamson Comic Opera Company. . . . Miss Marjorie Cnard and Mr. Langhorne Burton," of the. Nellie Stewart Company, leave for England on 23rd 'instant. Mr. Harcourt Beatty and Mr. Gaston Mervale- join the company this month. . . . Admirers of the "Blue Moon" and "Lady Madcap" Company, under Mr. J. C. Williamson's direction, will remember Mr. Reginald Kenneth, who is now playing the king in "The King of Cadonia" in the English provinces In the revival of "The Merry Wodow" in Melbourne. Mr. Mauric^ Dudley is playing tho rolo of Kisch, a part created in Australia by Mr. W. S. Percy. . . . ,

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MIMES AND MUSIC., Evening Post, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 117, 13 November 1909

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2,442

MIMES AND MUSIC. Evening Post, Volume LXXVIII, Issue 117, 13 November 1909

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