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Lawn Tennis.

(By "Huka."> ( Last Saturday's fine weather attracted many players to their several club grounds, and hard practice was the order of the day. The general topic was the approaching inter-club matches. Many of tho players seemed anxious to strike form at once, and a goodly number appeared disappointed because their cunning of last season could not be recovered in the few short games they had. The Wellington Club has gained a large number of new players, Bomo of them of great promise, and there will be keen rivalry for positions in the senior and junior teams. As far as can ba gauged at present, this club should havo about the best say in the shield and cup contests, but until other clubs expose their strength it is very hard to judge. Weir, late of Christchurch, and Salmond, of Dunedin, will possibly play for Wellington. A good lady player from England will also be a member. The Khandallah Club has decided not to enter a team for the inter-club contests this season, but possibly may think better of its decision, and continuo in the friendly struggle-r-botb. for its own good and that of the sport. Jones, who played fourth man last year, will probably play for a town club unless the suburban one enters a, team. Victoria College should be able to put a good senior team in the field, and its [ junior teams should do better this season with the experience gained last season. [ Brougham Hill, seemingly, has not secured any new players to strengthen its senior team, but has one or two who should greatly assist tho junior teams. This club in the past catered well for young players, but does not seem to have gained much benefit from them, as far aa playing strength is concerned — the reason of which is hard to understand. Newtown, as usual, will put up a good i sleady fight, but will be somewhat hampered owing to its loss of courts. That it may soon have a new and permanent home is the wish of all tennis players. Thorndon, being the only grass court slub in the city, has not, of course, yet started play. The club is a strong one, and one would gladly see it enter the lists lhis_ year for inter-club contests, thereby adding more interest to the events, and perhaps regaining for itself the title of champion club in the Wellington province. This 'club, were it to put its best players 1 in the field, would, I believe, win the olub ! championship from any other club in NewZealand. Tha Petono Olub will probably have tho services of Green, late of Wellington, this I season, and should possess a very good ohance in the cup contest. Of the other junior clubs' strength much is not yet known, but one or two should be stronger than formerly. j Some of tha city clubs, have between forty and fifty nominations for membership, but there are unfortunately only vacancies for a very limited few, consequently some players will bo debarred unless new clubs spring up. Clubs cannot be formed unless they can procure ground*, and the agitators against the Town Belt being opened up for recreation purp«sei (what it was really intended for), instead of being preserved for tho grazing of animals, will Bimply, if successful, compel those who wish for healthful and easily procured exercise and enjoyment to become spectators. Spectators in abundance no doubt swell the banking account of any sports body, but the sport of tennis, or any sport, should bo for ouo and all, and it would be better" for the sport and for everybody concerned to have tho spectators as players. Surely players and lovers of sport generally must see that in order to give allja chance to play any game the fees, etc., must be kept as low as possible. That cannot be done unless grounds are procurable at a very small rental. It is lime now to rise en masso and show thetrue strength of the sporting bodies in th» city. Thi» cause is * common one, but the tennis players are worse off for grounds than followers of other sports, and they should lead the way, so that their story will be presented with full foroe — not only for themselves, but for the future generations of tennis players in the city. Tha young children should not be forgotten, and no doubt any clubs receiving- the right to play on the Town Belt would gladly cater for them. In fact, that should b» a condition. The bell, with twenty or thirty tennis courts dotted over it would indeed bo an improvement, and the improvement need not cost the council a, single penny. THE DAVIS CUP. Tho English Association has been against sending a team after the Davis Cup, unless the "best team" was available. The Doherty brothers had to bo in it, otherwise th« team was not representative, but how long is England going to depend upon the famous two ? If tho British Isles cannot supply a representative team because two of its players are not available, there must indeed bo a bad time in store for tennis in tho Old Country. The _ association surely could take a beating, if one so happened. Australasia faced the music without any guarantee, and took two beatings, but again tackled all-comers and won. Their perseverance was spoken of as' British pluck, and they were referred to as "chips off the old block," and several other nice things were said about them, but now the cup is out here, the British Lion at first could not see his way to send a team unless the strongest; was available, which seems tantamount to saying : "If we come out, we must be sure of winning." Secondly, a guarantee was asked for, and because the reply was not wholly" satisfactory — although an offer was made to arrange matches between the British team and the various States on Rate-sharing principles — the trip was dropped. America was then cabled to, and asked if the preliminary tie could be played in Philadelphia for the guarantee of £300, originally offered l^r the United States. The British Isles had refused this offer before, because it was thought that_ the Doherty brothers preferred to visit Australasia ; at any rate, it was reported that they had "expressed their willingness" to go to Australasia, but_ now, to cap all, they have definitely decided not to play. America has agreed to decide the tie in* Philadelphia, and M. J. G. Ritchie, J. C. ■ Parke, Kenneth I'owell, and possibly another, will make up the British team. TENNIS ABROAD. Boucher, who recently beat Wilding in Wales, won the Edgbaston championship, beating Parke, who represents the British Isles for the Davis Cup, 6—2, 6—3, 6—2, in the final. This was the victor's third successive win for the handsome trophy, which has now become his absolute property. Dr. Eaves won tho championship of Notts County by beating JDixon, 2—6, 6—2, 6—4, 7—5. R. F. Doherty retired in the first round, but, with Hillyard, won the doubles after a hard 5-set match. He also won the combined with Mrs. Winch. J. C Parke won the Irish championship fer the third time, beating Wylie, the American, in the final, 4-^6, 6—l, , 4— «, 6—3, 6—o. Misa D. Harraan, of i Christchurch, competed in the ladies' championship at this meeting, but was beaten by Miss Monahan, 6—l, 6-— l, in the first round. Miss Monahan then fell 6 — 2, 7-7-5, to Miss Martin. It is fiva years since Miss L. Martin, nine times lady champion of Ireland, appeared iti public, and she lost to Miss Garfit, 7 — h, 6 — l, in the semi-final. Miss Garfit won the event. Miss Black, who, it is understood, is the same lady that competed in the New Zealand singles of 1894, and was beaten by the ultimate champion (Miss H. Hitchings) in tho nemi-final, 6 — o, 3 — 6, 6 — 4, also competed, but was beaten by Miss Boucher in love sets in the first round. Miss E. Black was

champion of Western Australia in 1902. Miss Harman was on scratch in the handicap, but Misa Holder (owe 5—6)5 — 6) beat her in the second round, 6—l,6 — 1, 6—3.6 — 3. Miss Black, also on scratch, lost in the third round to Miss Nicholson (owe 2^-b), 6—4, 4—6, 6-2. Boucher beat Dr. Eaves (holder) for the championship of Northumberland in the semi-final, 6-74, 7—9, 6—l. The loser was in no condition to last a, hard eet out. Boucher won the final from Hillyard, 6—2,6 — 2, 6—2,6 — 2, 6—l.6 — 1. Mrs. Chambers (holder) won the ladies' championship from Mrs. Sterry, 6—l, 7—5. Kenneth Powell, one of those chosen to represent the British Isles for the Davis Cup, had a grim battle for the champipn6hip of Shanklin against C. H. Ridding. Tho latter led 5—2 in the first set, but Powell evened and won at 15 — 13. Then Ridding took the next two sets at 9—79 — 7 and 7—5,7 — 5, but failed to battle the match out, and Powell took the next two sets at 6—2,6 — 2, 6—4.6 — 4. Tho match took two and three-quarter hours to finish, and the number of games played was 74. Condition won. L. O. S. Poidevin won the championship of Craigside, beating Watt, 6^—l, 6—o, 6—l,6 — 1, in tho final. Poidevin just beat Posnett, the Irish player, in the semi-final, 7—5,7 — 5, 6—4.6 — 4. The Australian left immediately after his victory to_ play for Lancashire against York at cricket, and made the highest score for his side. Poidevin will be seen out in Australia this summer, but, intends returning to the Old Country about next-April, and will possibly compete at the Riviera meetings. Karl Behr, the American player who showed such brilliant form at Wimbledon last year, and who gave Brookes such a,_ fine fight, was beaten badly at the Middle States meeting in America this season by the Rev. H. J. Rendall. Behr won a love set for a start, but could only score four more- games in the match. The championship was won by E. P. Lamed, brother of the champion, who scratched to his younger brother in the challenge round, so there is in doubt as to which is the better player. E.P., when on his way to the final, beat such champions as W. J. Clothier and R. D. Little.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19080919.2.107

Bibliographic details

Lawn Tennis., Evening Post, Volume LXXVI, Issue 70, 19 September 1908

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1,733

Lawn Tennis. Evening Post, Volume LXXVI, Issue 70, 19 September 1908

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