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THE TURF.

NEWS AND NOTES. The Nelson mare Battler, vho was sold by auction at the dispersal of the Gr.assl.ea stud for 1000 guineas, was included amongst the -lots disposed of at Wapiti in the summer of 1902, shortly before her breeder, Major George, went to England. With no performances of note to her credit,, the competition for Rattler in Auckland was of a weak character, and she fell to Mr. J. B. Williamson for 85 guineas. The Ellerslio trainer did not. get a raco out of the chestnut mare, and she was put to the stud in 1903, to be subsequently pold in 1905 to the late Mr. G. G. Stead for 220 guineas. So far the produce of Rattler have not achieved distinction, but her two-year-old son Xautiform (by Multiform), sold for 2050 guineas on the 13th, inst., is reckoned to be one thai will win fame for his dam. First' acceptances for the New Zealand Cup are due on Friday next, when weights for Rangitikei will also appear. The name claimed by the owner of tho Westmere — Lebrina gelding,' Billy /the Bear, is not likely to be approved by tho chairman of tho Racing Conference. If this namo was allowed we would soon have similar nomenclature such as Paddy the "Pig, Tommy tho Mug, and iMickey the Goose, appearing in the turf records. The third meeting of the season of the Wellington Pony and Galloway Club has been fixed for' Saturday, 17th. October. The names of 'Frisco and Apa appear among ths acceptances for the Caulfield and "Melbourne Cups. The new owner 'of Mooitan is Gordondhas Khatau, a native Indian sportsman. Tho transfer of the horse from Mr. J. Samuel tor him has been approved by the V.R.C. Golden Slipper has gone into J. Finn's stable at Randwick. Formula, the full sister to Multiform, who was sold afc the dispersal of the Wellington Park Stud in 1906 to Mr. G. P. Donnelly for 1050 guineas, has this season thrown a colt foal to tho English sire Gold Reef. At the time she was sdid Formula had a colt foal at foot by Seaton DelaVal, and was stinted to the sam<s sire. The Hotchkiss mare proved barren, so that her colt by Gold ' Reef is the- first youngster she has produced afc Mr, Donnelly's estate. The New Zealand-bred pony Cocky (by Wahiku) scored another win at the Fleet meeting, held at Ascot, on the 19th. He carried top weight (10.0) in the Paul Jones Handicap, four furlongs, and just lasted long enough to win. In the Connecticut Handicap (13.3), four furlongs, Thespana carried 12.0 into fourth place. Trixy (8.5), second top weight, scored on the post. The Old Glory Handicap was run in. two divisions. Lilliaster (Malster — Lillias) won the first and Lord Brockleigh (Blockleigh — Lady Conceit) the second race. The firstnamed won the run off. The American Handicap for 14. 2' s and under, four and a half furlongs, brought out Lady Zion, a successful performer at Miramar last Easter. She carried top weight (9.7), and went out first favourite, but could get no nearer than fourth to Skylark (9.6), by WoodlaKk— Black Swan. The Fleet Handicap, of ' 400 soys, five and a half furlongs, brought out a field of -twenty. Mutineer (lato Dr. Quest) was first favourite, but was never prominent. The -winner turned up in Lady Isabel, by Haut Brion (imp.) — Lady Westbourne (imp.), and was bred at Milton Park by Mr. S. Hordern. The Welcome Handicap, of 200 soys, for 14.1's and under, four and* a, half furlongs, was won by Smoodger. Mutineer (10.3) was saddled up again for tho Abraham Lincoln Handicap for 14.35, five furlongs. He was best backed, and again let his supporters down. F. Fielder, who rode Mutineer earlier in the afternoon, was taken off and Thompson substituted. Fielder got home on Danseuse. Fielder scored again on Danseuse the following day at Victoria Park. A. , Thompson, one of the bestknown of the pony jockeys, waa< put out for six months for his handling of Starlight. The death occurred recently at Ourrandooley of Procella, dam of San Fran She was by Grand Flaneur from Auk, by the The Marquis, from Seagull, by Fisherman, from Omen (imp.), by Melhourne, and was bred in 1882 by Mr. T. Chirnside. In 1887 she was bought on behalf of Mr. 1 J. R." Smith for 270gns, and while at Tucka Tucka threw Ohio, Woodlark, and San Fran to Gozo. In Queensland Ohio was quite a champion, while Woodlark, . though a fair horse, was ae mew h a *' unlftcky. San Fran was undoubtedly the best of her proge*ny. He 'scored his first win in a Sydney Cup, subsequently won a Metropolitan, and with, 9.7 ran a good second to Revenue (7.10) in the Melbourne Clip of 1901. In New Zealand San Fran is ,now making a name for himself as a sire. Subsequent to San Fran, Procella's progeny were of little account, and a couple of years ago she v/as sold to Mr. H. Osborne for 60gns. She was mated with Orzil labt season, and her death was the result of slipping a foal to that horse. Solution's halfsister, Prophecy (by Phoebus Apollo), was reported to be amiss a few months back. She is evidently all right again, and is the best horse in West Australia at the present time. At KaJgoorlie on 10th August she won the Spring Stakes, of 300 soys, one milo and a quarter, weight fdr age, in 2min llfsee. On the 19th August she carried 9.6, and won the Kalgoorlie Cup of 1000 soys. The present 'is the second visit of the Soulfc potfy .Frederick to New South Wales. On the previous occasion, about eighteen months ago, he 'won a Flying Handicap at Hawkesbury. Sinco returning he won an open handicap at the Auckland spring meeting, and a pony race at Otahuhu, carrying the welter weight, 6i 11.7. At the same meeting he ran second with 11.11. Frederick and Hughie were taken across about «iix weeks ago. There was a good attendance the day they were put up at Mr. Inglis's yards in Pitt-street, but the reserve v.yis not reached, and 'both ponies were passed in. During the past few weeks, Frederick, who is undoubtedly fast over six furlongs, has won two races among the big horses. Wallasey (by Birkenhcad) ran third in a Welter Handicap at Canterbury r'ai'k on 15tb August. 4 THE ECLIPSE STAKES. SUCCESS OF MR. J. B. JOEL'S 30RSE. EXTRAORDINARY SCENE ON THE COURSE. (From Our Own Correspondent.) LONDON, 24th July. Many strange scenes have been witnessed on racecourses, but none in a first-class race comparable to that on Friday when Mr. J. B. Joel's horse, ''lour Maicat^ won the Fdifise Rt.akea

at Sandown Park from a group of nipre reputable horses, of whom Mr. Leopold do Rothschild's Santo Statq finished second and Mr. Neumann's Siberia third. Mr. Joel, it will bo recalled, is prosecuting Mr. R. S. Sievier, a wellI known sporting journalist, the charge I being alleged blackmail. The public favourites, Lesbia, White Eagle, and Mountain Apple, were failures, and thus the greatest race of the season as to the huge prize money — £10,000 — as well as the quality of tho horses engaged, resulted in a general surprise. "Eclipse Stakes" ranks among the great social functions of the se^on. King Edward saw the contest from "the Royal pavilion, and large numbers of the chief patrons *bf the- turf were prej sent m the members' enclosure. There was an enormous crowd of the general public, but torrential showers fell and I compelled the use of waterproofs ; in fact, few ladies ventured out'of shelter, and thus the eliow was robbed of much of its picturesque colour. Speculators chiefly favoured^ Lesbia and White Eagle, most prominent of the ! rest in market being Mountain Apple, Siberia, and Santo Strato. The oddly tempered Vamose looked, as usual, in" i beautiful trim, but was no more regarded than Ahab or Your Majesty. The absence of Signorinetta was much regretted, but it may be added that the tangled skein of three-year-old form is aheady beyond all unloosing. All the competitors got away on fairly level terms, the feature of the first staga in the race being that Lesbia settled down with a lead, and Mountain Apple figured last. A moment later White Eagle dropped back. Passing the paygate Lesbia .went on from Covenenter and Vamose 1 , Dalgety slightly in front of Santo Strato, followed by Your Majesty, ' Siberia, and White Eagle. On rounding the bend Mountain Apple dropped back with Ahab in the rear, and Santo Strato shot past and took a couple of lengths' lead, but, going rather wide, Lesbia' again appeared prominently on the rails. Here Covenanter was beaten, and cries were heard in the straight for Vamose, who came on third from Dalgety and Whita Eagle. Yo.ur Majesty did not succeed in getting the opening sought for, and a' quarter of a mile from, home was pulled out on the stand side v The cplt quickly put in some giant work, and, with Lesbia and White Eagle beaten at the distance, Mr. Joel's colt collared Santo Strato and woi< by two lengths. Siberia was beaten a neck for second place (on which nearly 1000 soys. depended), and White _agle lost third money by a very narrow margin. The cowardly Vamose passed the post fifth. No sooner did the winner's victory seem assured than the general public indulged in a terrific volume of hooting, hissing and yelling, which it is said could be heard a mile away. Some few faint cheers were heard at the first possible interval, and this aroused a second storm of execration. The crowd hissed and hooted and groaned. The hostile demonstration was kept up all the time the jockey, Walter Gripgs, was weighing-m, and the calling of the "All right" was tho signal for the renewed chords of groans. It was a memorable Eclipse Stakes day — one not likely soon to be forgotten by backers, tho majority of whom had about the most costly experience known this season, already 1 tadly distinguished for unpleasant surprise* in a lengthy series of great races. Nothing like the reception of Your Majesty has' ever occurred to blotch the records of English racing. A "Jubilee" j winner, it is recalled, has been hooted, and in remoter times , some "engineering" with two horses belonging to adead owner nearly caused a riot at Epsom. Generally, however, in the cause of unpopular results the public manifest admirable restraint, and frigid si- • lence is very expressive on such occafions. But on Friday tho crowd inaisted on making a scene, and a peculiar savageness branded their noises, as if the demonstrators were actuated by of personal animosity. Both the horse and his jockey, as the unwilling cause of this unsportsmanlike ebullition, had the sympathy of everyone outside the ranks of the demonstrators. Mr. Joel was not present to witness the reception of his horse. In the following race, a horse called Waterloo, belonging to Mr. Sievier, ran, and on making his appearance on the course he. .v/as vociferously cheered. Waterloo was. beaten, so no opportunity occurred for a renewal of the demonstration. His owner was also absent.

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THE TURF., Evening Post, Volume LXXVI, Issue 55, 2 September 1908

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THE TURF. Evening Post, Volume LXXVI, Issue 55, 2 September 1908

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