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Lawn Tennis

(By "Huka."} The Wellington Civil Service Championship Singles and Handicap Singles (the latter event 60 points advantage) are to be played for at the Brojigham Hill courts on Arbor Day, 22nd July. The Championship Singles— best of 23 games— has attracted a good entry, and the- most fancied to supply the winner are Hunter, Redward, Watkins, and Lewis. The entries closed yesterday with Mr. F. A. Lewis (Koads Department). The Management Committee —Messrs. Lewis, Watkins, *nd o'l.eary — have all arrangements well in hand, and, given fine weather, an enjoyable day's sport, both for players and spectators, can be expected. A few more such events during the winter months would be beneficial to players. What about the bankers, lawyers, and insurance officers arranging a meeting. Much, uncertainty is at present felt in connection with tho Davis Cup contests, set down for November, in Melbourne. Mr R. B. Hough, x prominent member of the All England Lawn Tennis Club, writeß privatcsly that there is not much chance of a British team competing in tho Davis Cup contest this year, as the strongest British players will not be available. R. F. Doherty is not playing much match tennis, as his health will not stand it, and his brother, H.L., seems to have forsaken the tennis lawns for the golf links. S. H. Smith has retired from active play, and H. Roper-Barrett cannot afford the time to make the trip. A. W. Gore may possibly be available, also Hillyard or .Ritchie, but a team without any of the fournamed players would hardly have much chance of lifting the cup. Still, hopes are buoyed up by the cable that came to hand this week to the effect that the Doherty brothers will bo available if selected to represent Britain. With the "little Doo" and the "big Doo" as tho chosen, and possibly Goto as a reserve, the British team would be the favourites. Hugh Lawrence Doherty, "H.L., or Laurie," as he is known to his particular friends, was born in London on Bth October, 1876, and he' took to lawn tennis when just a lad. At the age of 15 he won the Kenshaw Cup for tho boys', championship, and five years later gained his "blue" at Cambridge. He was successful at numerous country meetings later on, and in 1897 represented England against Ireland. The following year, when only 22, he got to the final of the All England Singleß, but had to give way to his brother R.F. In 1902 he won the championship, and retained it for the four following years. In 1907 and this year he did not compete, 1 and it is indeed welcome news that there is a chance of him coming out to battle for the historic Davis Cup. R. F. Doherty, tho elder of the two famous brothers, is probably the finest single player in the world — or was. It is advisable to add "or was," as in many minds 'Norman Brookes, if not his superior, is, at any rate, quite his equal. Yet it is a hard question to decide, and the point will always be a knotty one until tho two champions meet. There is no doubt that R.F was always superior to his brother in form and style. Owing to illness, he had to retire from the singles contests, but by this mail it is seen that he* has been again taking part in tournament play, and the natural conclusion is that he has regained his usual health. Anyhow we all sincerely hope so. R.F. held the all-Eng-land singles from 1897 to 1900 (inclusive), and he gained his "blue" at Cambridge in 1895. It has been stated by cable that the Dohertys are likely to come direct to Australia, and if that is a fact, then the Americans will have to come out also, as they must meet the British team lin the preliminary tie. The rules provide that each competing nation shall, twenty-one days before the date fixed for the commencement of a tie, nominate its players. The contest is put down for Novomber, and at the very latest the challenging teams would require to be in Melbourne at the beginning of that month, or possibly sooner ; therefore it is reasonable to expect that the English team and its intentions regarding date of sailing will bo made public by next month at the latest. "Volley" in tho Canterbury Times of the 15th inst. has gone baldheaded for the New Zealand Association's Management Committee in connection with its action concerning the make of ball to be used at tho New Zealand championship meeting, and if his side of the question is founded on fact tho governing body's committee must bo trembling in its shoos. On the attention of the New Zealand Association's hon. secretary being drawn to the particular pars, he smiled, and said nothing, and on being pressed for his views excused himself as he said ho declined to be drawn by "Volley" to defend the action of his committee. When asked if "Volley's" statements were facts, he said : "No, tho case has been so put that tho New Zealand Management Committee appears to be at fault. For instance, the Wellington Association received notice, like other associations, that the ball had been adopted, and 'Volley's' statement that Wellington was favoured by the committee is incorrect, and his attack with regard to the Wellington players being the only players in New Zealand important enough to bo considered, is unworthy of any true sport, and must have originated in his own mind." Asked as to Canterbury's complaint as to the make of ball originally in use, the New Zealand Secrej tary said that the Canterbury Secretary was written to on the 4th April, and was not worried for a reply, as stated by "Volley." A reply was received on the 22nd April, one portion of which ran as follows:— "If the ball" (meaning tho Sykes's) "is good, and is what it is made out to be, it has just come at the. right time." That was an official letter, and was, of course, read to tho committee. "Volley" should try and be sure of his statements. He has done more harm than good for the cause that he has been writing for. Palpablyi he knows nothing about tho matter, otherwise he would be aware of what had been done concerning the complaints received in 1906. A. F. Wilding won the challenge cup at the North of France championships hold at Lille, beating C. P. Dodge, the American, in the final, s— o, 6—3, 6—2; and with tho latter he also took the doubles, beating the holders— Watson and Dv Vivier, 9—7, 6—3, 6—2, in the final. Tho combined also went to the colonial, with Mdlle. Masson, from eleven other pairs: In the final, they boat Watson and Miss Lane, 6—3,6 — 3, 6—2.6 — 2. 11. F. Doherty competed at the Leicester meeting, and after winning easily up to the semi-final, retired to G. W. Hillyard, who beat Crawley in the final. Crawley beat Eaves, who is well known as a Sydney pi ay or, in the semi-final, 3—6, 6—o, 6—3. Hillyard and Doherty won the doubles, beating Eaves and Ball-Greene in the final, 6—3, 7—5, 7—5. Doherty and Mrs. Winch also won the combined. R. F. Doherty is reported as playing with all his old skill and effectiveness at Leicester, and it is hoped that the medical veto which prohibits him from taking pa.it in hard matches will be removed ere long. One of his matches in the combined handicap when playing with Lady Cow ley ran to fifty games, and at the end he did not seem much the worse for it, although he ,had been covering about four-fifths of the court. He won the match, B—lo,8 — 10, 9—7, 9—7. H. L. Dohorty competed in the amateur golf championship of England just lately, and although it was his first appearance in the. competition ho got to the fitlh round, where he was beaten by j T. Graham, tho Liverpool player. Gra- ' ha... was the favourite for tho championblnp, and, playing at tho fop of his form, beat Doherty threo holes from home.

A curious vegetable milk is used in Japan. It is made from the Soja bean. Tho liquid is exactly like cow's milk in appearance, and in taste can hardly be distinguished from it. To mak« it the beans aro first soaked and then boiled in water. Somo sugar and phosphate of potassium *ro added, and it is boiled down til] it has tho consistency of condensed milk. Tho preparation of tho seed bud is a matter that successful farmers never neglect. The practical farmer knows that timo is well spent in thoroughly pulverising soil.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19080718.2.126

Bibliographic details

Lawn Tennis, Evening Post, Volume LXXVI, Issue 16, 18 July 1908

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1,462

Lawn Tennis Evening Post, Volume LXXVI, Issue 16, 18 July 1908

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