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MIMES AND MUSIC.

It is reported that Miss Mario Campbell, who was principal boy with the "Sinbad the Sailor" pantomime, died in America recently.

Miss Norah Kerin has made a great success as Juliet in the London Lyceum in a revival of "Romeo arid Juliet."

Miss Maggie Knight (Mrs. H. Henderson) has joined the Beatty-M'lntosh Company, and will appear as Madame Prudence in "Camille."

"The Scarlet Pimpernel," to be played here by Julius Knight and the J. C. Williamson Company supporting him, has been translated into the German, and is being produced at Berlin.

A minimum wage of £2 per week is being demanded in London for actors and actresses, who aro defined^ as those who speak more than three lines of a play.

From a grand stand favourite to the idol of grand opera audiences. Paul Bourillon, who was the champion sprint cyclist of tho world in 1896, is now a leading light in grand opera on the continent.

•Messrs. J. and N. Tait purpose arranging an Australian tour for Signora •Revello, the brilliant Spanish soprano, whom they aro bringing out at the Melbourne Town Hall on 6th June.

There are 1200 theatrical organisations travelling in the United States, and between 25,000 and 30,000 people are employed in the theatrical business, according to a statement made by President Burnham, of tho Theatrical Managers' ( Association.

Some aspiring amateurs need to take to heart very seriously the dictum of Mark Hambourg that no important piece should ever be added to a pianist's repertoire for platform performances until at least a year has been spent on its preparation.

Mr. Sothern is the only actor-manager in America who is blessed with three leading women, their names being Florence Eeed, Virginia Hammond, and <31a<iyB Hanson. iMi-ss Beod pla-ys th» leading part in "X I Were King," Miss Hammond in "The Fool Hath Said There is No God," and Miss Hanson acts the principal female role in. "Lord Dundreary."

'Miss Emily Dyason has been engaged as solo pianist for the Kubelik concert tour, which is about to begin in 1 Australia. Miss Erna Muellor, her fellowstudent in the East Melbourne Conservatorvum, has been for some time a member of the Kubelik Company, and, now that Miss Dyason has joined, Bendigo will have two distinguished representatives on the platform.

Mr. Hy. Saint George, who will conduct the Trinity College music examinations in New Zealand and Tasmania, is a violinist composer, and writer on musical subjects, and a son of Mr. George ■Saint George, the composer of violin music. He ia the author of several musical works, and edited the Strad for four years. Mr. Saint George ia an. acknowledged authority on the history of ancient instruments, and, in conjunction with his -'father, introduced three hitherto unknown works of Bach to the British public, being the first to give a recital solely of Bach's music <in England.

Of (Mr. Edward Nable's performance as General dcs Ifs, in "The Little Micb.ua," a Brisbane paper says : — "Even Mr. George Lauri's undoubted ability, and his immense popularity cannot rob •Mr: Edwa»d Noble of the reward ho reserves for his acting in the part of General dcs Ifs. When at the end of twenty minutes' comedy on the stage, an audience heartily applauds the comedian who has kept them in continuous laughter, thcro can be no doubt of the actor's ability. Such was Mr. Nable's success in this, his first performance of the part. The fiery, garrulous General of the long and bumpy career, and the ornate observations on ' men and things, presented by Mr. Nable, was a highly creditable piece of work, and eclipsed in. humour many moro widely advertised parts in recent plays."

"Micawber" to the Bulletin : Philip Wirth speaks of picture shows driving i circuses out of business on the Continent. In America the condition of vaudeville is critical, hundreds of houses going over to the ranks of the flickerfraph. As representative here of a "ankee vaudeville paper, I received the following letter last week — it explains itself : — "Kindly give particular attention to the moving pictures in your town ; also send along any newspaper clippings 'of all v available matter relating to this particular branch of the profession. This is important, as the biograph threatens to be tho staple amusement producer, and as such wo must cater accordingly." Further extracts state that in several towns vaudeville is now an unknown, quantity."

Kubelik, after holding up the U.S.A. at the point of the bow for 112 concerts, arrives in Sydney via Vancouver on 18th May. , The rampage round Australasia will be short (says Sydney Bulletin), as he must be in London for a tour beginning 6th October. Kubelik is an intensely engaged man. His home, Bychory Castle, near Kolin, is a fairytale palace, and the poor man never gets home for 'more than two months in the year. Mrs. Kubelik conies with her husband. She used to be the Countess Cznaky-Cnell, but she got so tired of spelling her name that she got married for a rest. Someone who has met the Countess describes her as a magnificent, auburn-haired beauty — quite a Hungarian Rhapsody, in fact.

So Lauri has no good-bye for _ our city (writes "Melb." to the Bulletin). Well, he wouldn't sacrifice the big sum which a Melbourne benefit would yield him if he could help it. Gouriet is an excellent comedian, but will not fill Lauri's hiatus. That is to say, if the new pieces, have Lauri parts. But fashion changes so. TheJ may have Gouriet parts. Gouriet is similar to Elton, or Courtneidge, a character actor. Lauri is the comic lecturer, like Greville or Toole. He comes on in an irrecognisable make-up, but directly he opens his moutb the wig flies up into the flies, the clothes vanish through invisible traps, the paint washes itself off, except that inevitable streak of rouge under his lip This helps a faint suspicion that there is always a bit of the pantomimic in Lauri, as with George Leopold and Edouin. Yes, a smack of "Here we are again," and "How are you to-morrow?" I suppose Lauri's screw monkeyed round half a monkey a week. Yet even after he had so wonderfully replaced Elton in "The Old Guard" and the like," there came along a class of operas like "'The Gay Parisienne" and "The French Maid," where he couldn't shine. He was away from Williamson for some time. He even did variety turns at Melbourne Opera House with Addie Conyers. Then came a swoop of pieces with Lauri parts in excelsis. As Hazlitt writes of Jack Bannister, he puts a character over himself like a surtout, warm and comfortable. He is an actor of temperament, evcii ap Duso

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP19080513.2.41

Bibliographic details

Evening Post, Evening Post, Volume LXXV, Issue 113, 13 May 1908

Word Count
1,118

MIMES AND MUSIC. Evening Post, Volume LXXV, Issue 113, 13 May 1908

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