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Lawn TenniS.

[I3t Huka.] BROOKES AND WILDING ABROAD. Tho Cannes meeting of this year was ono of tho best held on the Riviera. This annual tournament has always been, a favourite, and is of long standing. Again the entries weru splendid — players in quantity and quality putting in an appearance. A. F. Wilding was tho holder of tho championfehil) and tho Beau Site Cup, and every one expected him lo reneat last year's performance Beal. C. Wright, tho noted American player, as woll as his brother, J. C, although entered in tho Singles, did not compete. Wilding started badly in the second round againet Powell, and nearlylost tho first set, but by steady work ran out a winner, 9—7, 6—o. Kitchio just boat that good exponent of the game, A. Wallis Myers, 6—4, 7—5. The last-named player is a writer of considerable merit, and many will remember that fine book of hie, "Lawn Tennis at Home and Abroad." Ho is now engaged on a blandard illustrated work on the eport, and intends giving considerable space to the progress and developmert of lawn tennis in tho colonies. In the third round Wilding and Ritehio met. It was a glaring hot day, and what with the sun beating down on the hard glazed courts, which seemed to throw tho heat up again considerably intensified, and perhaps partly on account of tho wonderful generalship of Ritchie, the New Zealauder did not last the match out. A few days before Wilding had beaten his opponnt crafty at Nice, and with tho first set going easily in his favour, it looked as though the Beau Sito Cup was won. First sot ended 6—2 to Wilding, but tho Englishman was not done with, and going strong from the opening of tbo second j set, he, despite his opponent's tremendous efforts to rositt, secured sot 6—4.6 — 4. In the final sot Ritchie had complete mastery, and his clever side-line parsing shots came off nearly every time. Wilding did his bost to rush the net, but was roplied to by woll-placed lobs, which Wilding tried to smash, but the glare was co strong that he invariably mis-timed them, and he retired beaten in tho third set, 6—2.6 — 2. It was a fine performance, and clearly showed that the New Zealander had always to be in his best form if ho wished to beat M. J. G. Ritchie. Ritchie beat D. I. Rhodes, tho American, in the final, 6—4-,6 — 4-, 6—2,6 — 2, and tho latter then retired. Rhodes is the player that han been freely commented upon of late as to his serving. It is> contended he makes "walking start" faults, and already tho case has been before the council in England. In fact, G. R. Ncwburn, tho hon. sec. of the L.T.A., ha* asked for suggestions that will provide for such eases, by an amendment of, or addition 10, the present service la-w, as the prohibition against a player taking a "walking start" does not seem to go quite far enough. In the Doubles Wilding and Ritehio had a great fight with tho Wright Brother*, winning 6—4,6 — 4, 4—6,4 — 6, 6—l,6 — 1, 6—2.6 — 2. Beal Wright, the American ex-champion, played a very fino and plucky game, although con.Eiderably out of condition. In tho semifinal the losers had beaten A. Walliß Jlyers and Powell, 7—5, I—6, 7—5. Wilding and Bnrtoult, on the scratch mark iv tho Doubles Handicap, were beaten in tho first round, 6—l,6 — 1, 6—3.6 — 3. Mrs. Maedonald and Wilding (owe 3—6)3 — 6) won tho Combined from Mrs. Rhodes and Rhodes, of Bocton (15 — 4), after a sensational set, 16 — 14, the latter pair then retiring. In tho Championship Combined H. L. Doherty had Countess Sohulenburg for a partner, and although Miss Eastlake Smith and Wilding took the first set, 6—4,6 — 4, in tho final round, they were outclassed in tho second and third sots to the tuno of 6—l,6 — 1, 6—2.6 — 2. Wilding and his partner had beatcD thi3 pair at Nice, but on this occasion Doherty was in grent form, volleying and smashing anything or everything from any part of tho court. WILDING AT LYONS. Wilding had an easy run in the Championbhip Singles at this meeting, and repeatod his last j-oar's success. Ho beat Rhodes (the American), 6 — i, t—o,t — 0, in tho semi-final, and tho French playor-, Gcrmot, 6—l, 6—l, 6—4, in the final. Permot boat It. Powell, tho Cambridge player, in the semi-final, 6—2, 9—7. The Doubles fell to Wilding and Powell niter a very hard and exciting match against Germot and Rhodes. Tho Englishcolonial combination was too good, and won from tho French-American pair, 3—6,3 — 6, 6—3, 2—6, 6—l, 6—l. Andres (roc. 30) beat Wilding (owes 20 — 3) ""in tho semifinal of tho Handicap Singles, 6 — \, C — 6, 6—3.6 — 3. Mies Ivy Jacquier and Wilding (owo 3—6) wero beaten in tho final of the Combined Handicap by a Lyons pair, who received 15 — 1, tho score being 6—l,6 — 1, 6—l.6 — 1. Tho Jockey Club do Lyons gave visiting players a. banquet after tho meeting, and great interest was tdkon when it was made known that Wilding intended to give a speech in French. Tho speech was draftod out for him, and ho spent some hours iv attempting to commit it to memory, but something went wrong, and to the disappoint m'ojit of all his speech was an ordinary English ono. In viey ol tao All England championships Wilding is projbablv now in London (jolting grass p. - .ctico. All the courts on the Continent are hard courts, and very fiery at that, and he will want all the grass practice he can get for tho 24th. NORMAN BROOKES AT MANCHESTER. Tho twenty-seventh annual meeting for tho Northern championships took place at the Northern Lawn Tennis Club's grounds, Old Trafford. Thsa. meeting is usually attended by most of tho crack players of England, and generally gnoa some idea as to tho form of the likely competitors in tho All England championships. Norman Brookes, the crack Victorian player, has succeeded in winning the Championship Singles, and although poi liculars are not yet to hand, it is known that he beat thti'j btcrjmg player, X. E. CasdagU. (In 1905 A. AY. Dunlop, of Victoria, beat Casdagli, 6—3, b— 2, 5—7, 6—3. Hiscloy put Dunlop out in tho final, 6—o,6 — 0, 6—l, 6—4.) Brookes and Kendall wero beaten by Casdagli aud Charlton in Doubles. Ren. dall is an unknown quantity, but CasdagU is a goccl double player. He and Dunlop woro just beaten in tho final in 1905 by that grand pair, Smith and Riseloy, 3 — b, 6—2, 4—5, 6—4, 6—2. Sharp and Doubt, of Sydney, were beaten m tho final for tho East Surrey Championship Doubles by Lowo and Bentlcy. If this is A. L. Bentioy, he is usually on the scratch mark, and Ritchie would bo owinu 30, bo hia standard can bo gauged from that .somewhat, Ritchie beat him in tho All-England Championship last year, 6—o, 6—l, 6—2.6 — 2. Ah to Lowe, his form can be given an idea of by classing him with PowoU and Wilding, as follows:— Powell beat F. (J. Lowo at Cannes, 6—3,6 — 3, 6—3,6 — 3, and Wilding beat Powell, 9—7, 6—o. Of course Lowo and Bentioy may bo , very good double players, but they aro by no means top-no-'chers. A. H. Lowo,) of course, may havo been Benlley's partner, nnd ho is somewhat bettor than his brother. F. Salzmann bent Gaunt in the challra^o round for tha championship of Sinrajioro This is tho ovent that Nuuno'ty lost to him in tho semi-final. W. H. Collins, tho presidout of tl-o L T,A., has resigned, and tho announcement was received by tennis players- of England with deep regret. Mr. Collins has acted as captain for tho British team no fewer than s>c\ en times, nnd his resignation coining at this time would almost appear as a bad omen for Britain's chances in tho Davis Cup contest. Mr. E. H. Sothern and Miss Julia Marlowo were visiting Denmark this month. At tho little theatie 111 Marienlyst, only a fow hundred yards distant from tho pile of si ones known as "Hamlet's grave," a performance o f "Hamlot" was to take plucc." Closs at hand, too, is "Ophelia's well," mj called bccauso, accordingly to the accepttd legend, it had its source in Onhelin's *-">!•<;. Whether Shakespeare really visited Elsinore or not i» v pruoium wmvii will never probably be solvod. Mr. Sothern and Miss> Marlowe « ill be tho fnV- 111 modem times to piesent the poet's tragedy in its, original language on the vory spot where it is supposed to ha\c been, crucled.

The Case of (V3r. J. LORD. (BY A WELLINGTON REPORTER.) Interviewed by a special press reprelentative, Mr. James Lord, of No. 45 Mansiiold-street, Newtown, V\ elluigton, laid • — "It gives mo the utmost pleasure to reseive a journalist wishing to bring before the public the complete facts of an illness [ hail some-eight years ago, as an account of my recovery cannot f.iil to lead people ou to the right track when they tind their health lias gone astray." "I appreciate your kindly welcome," responded the writer. "Are you long resident in these parts ? " jj"l have lived 4iere a good while, and nso kuow Queensl nd, Victoiia, ami N«w South Wales well. On the other side J spent most of my young days on iv station, and many a long droving trip I have taken, whon tho heat was «o great that it would xlmost stifle one. A pretty monotonous life when the novelty has onco v/orn oil", mil you do not get the best of food cilher." " I suppose it is impossible to get any vegetables in those long journeys?" "My word, they would be a, luxury ! " j No ; we seldom saw vegetables, and I think I that fact had a lot to do with tho way my I digestion went wiong. 1 know that a few ' years of that kind of life made me an inveterate Buflerer from indigestion, and it was not until eight yeats ago thai I found out what was really good for that complaint — an ahsoluto cure, in fact." " What was that, Mi. Lord?" " Why, Clements Tonic. There is nothing in the woil.t like it ; and since I made its acquaintance long ago I havo very seldom been without a bottle in tho house, as 1 find it a grand thing for kecpiug the whole of the family in ex.c-llenu condition. I ought to consider myself an authoiity on medicine in one way, for when I was ailing so much [ had physic from a doctor in Brisbane, and also from a medical gentleman in Dubbo, New South Wales." "What did tho doctors say you wore suffering fiom?" "They nil put it down to the sluggish state of my liver, and, of course, they treated me in accordance with that view of my c»ae I might as well have been treated far a totally different complaint for all the good they did mo, and when at last I got tired of patronising the doctors any longer [ started to treat myso f with seine of the patent medicines that Lsaw advertised from time to time. It would be hard to say what [ did not resort to, yet no las'ing relief was jbt;iii<able, and so the only logical conclusion that I could come to was that the complaint had got too linn a hold upon me to bo removed. In this beliof, I am deighled to say, I was in error, as I soon 'ound out when I had been taking Clements Tonic a week or two, and as I kuow, from ny own experience, tlut that medicine • lands head and shcml lers above all others, I liink I have a right to let every suffer-r in jhe community become aware of the fact." "How did you become acquainted with ;hat medicine in tho first place ? " " I was advised by a medical man to try .t. I told him what I had ••one through, what I had taken for my afilictions, and sverything else about it ; and without a ■nomont's reflection ho told mo to get some ZHetneuts Tonic, and that would be sure to .lo me £;ood. I was surprised to get that Icind of advice from such a source ; but it was realty the bust he could have given me, is you would have said yourself had you seen mo a. fow weeks lat«r. And I need lardly tell you that I was deeply grateful ;o bo out of the misery I had been in so oiia. Kver since my liver hid commenced :o bother me I was assailed by violent seariaehes, that seemed to give a swollen eelins; to the eyes aud affect my sight, and lever a meal passed but th^it I was subjected : m a heavy sensation in the cheat. »s if the

food could not go any fmther. Wind *\m formed in the stomach, and gave mo tin most excruciating pains ot all, and I cauiio suggest any pams more tantalising thai those vihicli lingeied under my shoulder blades. And it was remai liable how inj loins used to ache, as if I had been walkin| miles and miles and had never taken a rest but I cun assure you that I never did gt any long distances, as those aches disiressei me quite enough, sometimes even when 1 only walked a lew yards. One of my pi iiv cipal enemies at that time was restlessness.* •'That would go against you a lot," in terrupted the icporler. " It helped to break mo up altogether,' replied Mi. Lord. "In fact, sometimes 1 got so weak and ill that I had to tai. c i spell awr.y from work. Fiom time to tinu it used to happen that for about a mouth n,t a stretch 1 would have an nnvndurabli period for the want of sleep, aud at thosi times it was absolutely impossible for me U exert myself with business matters iv anj shape or form. Those sleepless nights uud the amount of brain worry I had, combined wilh the everlasting tortures that I m»i enduiing through indigestion, made a sorrj wieck of my nervous system. The leas' excitement made me tiemblc all n\or, ani my spirits sank into the deepest deptlio o! nioLuicliolm. I could find no brightness it life whatever, and wh'en a man gets to bud v despondent, pitch as thxt his con iti<'U it to be p lied. My apuetilo was as poor ai it could possibly be ; yet the strange par" ofthatwas.th.it the lilt c I ate gitvu m« such a mountain of anguish to endure \\ hy, my stotnat h got so weak that of tei the food came up ugam soon after I liac swallowed it, aud so I lingered on uiiti Clements Tonic came to the front ;\nc showed its superiority over all other modi cines." . " You must hive been pleasantly sur prised with the results." "I assure you I was highly.' delightec with the eil'eets of Clements Tonic upon m* for it was not long tefoic the fcthnijs o! hopelessness had vanished, in view of Iha improvemtnta that had tsiltcn place. Hi nerve-iuvigoiating qualities wero quii-klj displayed, and I wns quite astounded uitl its effects upon my digestion, which wai thoroughly reorganised by Clements lonia The appetite I gained was very encouraging and only myself knows how gnatly I u|> predated rising from the table nnd havinj no chest paina nor flatulence to annoy mo I was also glad of being a-i.'e lo real well al nights, for then I could rise iv the moruingi feeling fresh for work, and no iuwniMij happy as though nothing had been w rouj with me. After ridding me of all 1115 pains, including those di-tiacting head . aches, an i fortifying my^syatem with n re mat k*blo supply of nerve force in pl.ic< ol tho quiverii'u's that existed there, Clement* Tonic <j mpleitd the cure by building nr my strength in such iv way that, as I mio befoie, I now legaid it us the be«-t mcdivinc in the luud, and you uri welcome to publish my view Bin any way you think fit." 1 STATCTOU? DECLARATION. I Jamk.i Loup. of Ko. 40 Mai.sficld-Btroe', Newtotm. Wellington mthcColoij o New Zc\Un<l, do solemnlj ami -inccieh decline ih <• I lmvccaiciullvreail ilu annexe I document, <Mi>sis:infj of three foiios, and consecimely numbered fioni one tothiee, and lint il contains and \i a (rue and faithful account «■! mj illucii and cure hy Clements Tonic, »nd als on tain-^ my full pcnnnaiui t imblMi in any "K< uij Bt.itenienis -which I gnc \oluntarilv. u'lthom ro cri\ii:i;nm piumcni. ; and I mnke this sol 1111 <!«• cla:ation tori»clmti«ualj btlicMii™ ihc e*me to l>< true, and by virtue of the j>ro\iiioiib of an Aci ol i)m Gcnfrai Auembly ot New Zealand, intituled "ThJ Juiucci of Peace Act, 1882."

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Bibliographic details

Lawn TenniS., Evening Post, Volume LXXIII, Issue 141, 15 June 1907

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2,819

Lawn TenniS. Evening Post, Volume LXXIII, Issue 141, 15 June 1907

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