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Lawn Tennis [By Huka.]

The sub-committee of the Wellington Lawn Tennis Aosociation Las accepted the offer of the Day's Bay ground. This should be good news to all tennis enthusiasts, us it means the first forward movomon for the lawn tennis players of Wellington City. Some clubs, or rather the committees of some clubs, were ngainst tho idea. It would seem that they, or most of them, were against inter-club tennis as a whole for their respective clubs. At any rate the matter is now settled, and if the average players assist tho object they will give nn impetus to the game and impress upon tho non-pro-gressive party the truth of the old adage "Nothing venture nothing gain." The few hard-working enthusiasts who have brought thb matter to a bead deservo every aseistunce from players. One of tho hardest workers has been Mr. Hurley , and he deserves con^i'ntulationa upon the success so far achieved. Wellington, like, other centres, cannot always expect to liavo the present champions to uphold its honour; therefore the wisdom of giving the less skilful a chance to improve must* bo apparent. At a meeting of tho AmuteuT Athletic Club last week, Mr. James Doyle is reported to have told those present that "ho had no time for ping-pong or tennis. " Mr. Doyle may have played ping-pong, but nevei tennis, or ho would not have spoken of having "no time" for the game. Lawn tennis encourages thought, social intercourse, individual oriainalit.v, be

sides giving healthy outdoor exercise, and is sufficiently interesting to be played by the most robust and agile. It has been the universal verdict of those who are capable of judging that five sets between players of good standing is a harder test than two forty-fives at Rugby football. Two players will usually take two hours in a five-set mateh — going at it continually — driving and placing in a space 27 \7B (single court). Indeed the pace of a single game is capable of bein^ forced to almost any exient ; one may say, with perfect truth, that the single, more than any t other game, affords the player free scope to put into it as much exertion of skill and strength as he pleases. Now it is exactly this kind of game whjch develops individual powers and compels self-reliance in those who desire success in it. The solid advantages in the lawn tennis single consist in these facts : — Firstly, that it is varied and exciting enough to arouse enthsuiasm in the majority of those who have ever seriously tried to play it. Secondly, that in order to be really successful in it, a player must develop a great many different qualities (including control of the temper under difficulties.) Thirdly, that in order to win matches against good players it is necessary to inure the frame to exertions which sometimes last a couple of hours. The beginner finds that appearances are deceptive, a 6 after watching good players, tho game seems "dead easy." but after wielding tho racket a' few times the illusion is dispelled. When the mind begins to grasp a few of tho finer points, and observation is brought into requisition, the game assumes a less difficult aspect, and correspondingly 'the player's hopes of future experiness soars 'a little higher. Some one has been criticising the "Mars Buckley" Cup and the New ZeaA land Association, and from particulars gleaned it appears that the facts'have not been put forward. In the first place the cup was presented to the Victorian Association, nob to the Australian Association. Then, again, the New Zealand Committee did not look at the New Zealand meeting as its reason for asking that the teams match nnd Australasian championships should be played together. Its policy wac that the events should always bo played at the same time and place, so that players would not require to make two trip 3 for the most important events of Australasia in one year. Again, no one on the New Zealand Committee has officially suggested secession on account of the "Mars Buckley" Cujp arrangement. The New Zealand Association only joined the Australasian Association under pressure, although the former body was the originator of the idea. It seems the rules and confctitutioti were altogether different from thoso suggested by- the committee of New Zoalanders, at a conference in Sydney. These rules were so unfair as to representation that the Nfcw Zealand Committee decided not to affiliate. It was only under pressure from Australia regarding the Davis Cup team that lf<<i\r Zealand, putting aside its own cause, decided to affiliate for the time being, but it gave notice that it would "withdraw in the near future unless alterations in the rules were made. Instead of thoso alterations being made, the Australasian Associntion has run on lines to suit the States in Australia, and although a sub-committee brought down a. report favourable to New Zealand in reference to the "Mnrs Buckley" Cup competition, the nssuciuUon took no notice of tho recommendation — in fact some members of the sub-committee agreed one way at the sub-committee meeting, but "jumped the rail" at the council meeting. The New Zealand Association has never received) within the last three or four years, any' trophy with conditions attached. It has accepted trophies with certain suggestions as to which event it should be allotted to, and so forth,' but it was not necessary to conform to such conditions if t£ey wer.e found undesirable. Donors, when "presenting trophies, can always be sure that their desires will be followed where practicable. Regarding the "Mars Buckley" Cup, the conditions were not acceptable in the eyes of the New Zealand Committee. A short time back the Australasian Committee refused to accept a cup from another donor, owing to the conditions attached. Of course it is nbfUi'A to siMjgcst secession on account of the "Mars Buckley" trouble, but before criticising the position, it would be wise if some pnoplo made themselves acquainted with the facts. In looking up some old records of 1892, "Huka" came across tho following, which is of interest : — "11. L. Doherty boat E. Watson, at Scarborough, in the Boys' Singles All-England Championship, and thereby wo* entitled to hold the ten guinea challenge cup for one year." H. I. Doherty in 1892 won tho Boys' Championship, and 1902 won tho Men's Championship of All-England. E. Watson, the runner-up to Doherty in 1892, has since won tho Yorkshire Championship, and as late as 1902 was playing second single for the County of York. Miss E. Crcssy, at the 1892 tournament," at Scarborough, Avon the Girls' All-England Championship, ■ and in 1897 effected a great surprise by brilliantly defeating Mrs. Hillyard in the Northern Championships at Manchester, the score being 13 — 11, 3—6,3 — 6, 7—5.7 — 5. Yet there are come who )3o not believe in young people being given games with 'grown-up players. Miss Hitchinps, an old New Zealand Champion, was beaten in the final for tho Challenge Cup at Criccieth by Mrs. Dudgpo»* 6—4, 6—4.6 — 4. Misses Hitchings and I'ompson won the Ilandicap Doubles, and tho former lady was just beaten, with Guest as a partner 1 , in tho Combined doubles 6— 4, 4—6, 7—5. At the Strathfield Tournament Parker and Rir.e were boatcn in tho Doubles Championship by Wright and A. B. Jonos, who won 5—7,5 — 7, 7—5,7 — 5, 6—l. Parker and Rice won the first pet nfter «, very hard contest, when the set almost looked lost. Jones and Wright led 4—o4 — 0 in the second set, and then s—l.5 — 1. and it looked all up, but Parker nnd Rico enme with a rush, but were beaten 7—5.7 — 5. The last set was a vralk-ovcr for the winners. Parker 13 not tho export at doubles that he is at singles. He completely outgeneralled Rico in tho Challenge Match for 1120 singles, and had him beaten in tho first &(Jt. Rice cannot see a hard match through now like ho used to do; in fact tho Australian pluvcra seem to invariably fail when tho pinch comes in a hard close matcu. After tho Tlamburg Tournament was officially over, some interesting matches ivere played. Mrs. Hillyard was pitted against Wilding, eenr., in a level single. •^"O lady won easily 6—l, 6—l. Miss Douglass played the German player I.ersner, tho latter giving tho lady 15. Miss Douglass won easily, 6—l, 6—l. A. P. Wilding -won the Hamburg Cup, beating Hillyard 6—1,6—2 in tho semi-final, and O. tfroitzhcim 6—l, 6—l,6 — 1, 6—4 in the final. Hillyard beat Leaner (who played and was beaten by Miss Douglass) 6—4, 7—57 — 5 in the fourth round. Miss Doug- . lass, beat Mrs. Hillyard in tho final of tho Ladies' Singles 6—4, B—6. Wilding and Simond beat Froetzhehn and Lersnor 6—3, 6—l, 6—2 in the final for the Championship of Europe. Wilding nnd Miss Douglass beat Biill-Grcenc and Mia. Hillyard 6—o, 6—3 in the final of the Mixed Open.

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Bibliographic details

Lawn Tennis [By Huka.], Evening Post, Volume LXXII, Issue 95, 20 October 1906

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Lawn Tennis [By Huka.] Evening Post, Volume LXXII, Issue 95, 20 October 1906

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