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AMERICA v. AUSTRALASIA. SPLENDID PLAY OF A. F. WILDING.

In the final for the Davis Cup Australasia was represented by Messrs. A. F. Wilding (New Zealand) and L. O. S. Poidevin (New South Wales) The American champion's (Beals Wright) hand was still too tender for play, and America relied upon Messrs. H. Ward and L. D. Little. The matches were played at Newport, and tho results were as follows : — Ward beat Poidevin 6—2,6 — 2, 6—4, 7—5 ; Little beat Poidevin 6—2, I—6, 7—5, 6—2; Wilding beat Little 6—2,6 — 2, B—6, 6—l, also beat Ward 6—3,6 — 3, 3_6, o—6, 6—4, B—6. In the doubles the Americans — Ward and Little — beat Wilding and Poidevin 7—5, 6—2, 6—4. America won by 3 rubbers to 2, 11 sets to 7, and 92 games to 80. Ward was too good for Poidevin, and took the first set 6—2;6 — 2 ; then the Australian raised the hopes of his party as ho led 4—2 in the second set, and even got within one point of 5—2,5 — 2, but Ward came at him and won set 6—4.6 — 4. Then again in the third set, by a plucky effort, Poidevin ran to s—l, and looked all over a winner, but the American plugged in and won set 7—57 — 5 and match. Considering Poidevin had little chance to get first-class practice, his -performance was full of merit. Wilding beat Little easily, although the latter made it six all in the second set. Wilding slacked off when ho was leading 5—2.5 — 2. Little tried to run in on Wilding's drives, but failed badly at the net. Then came the doubles. Australasia, led 5—35 — 3 in the first set, but Ward and Little won at ? — 5, and followed up by taking the next set 6—2.6 — 2. With four all in the third set Wilding lost his service and America took set 6—46 — 4 and match. Then came the Ward v. Wilding match. In the first set Wilding's American service was very good, and by his splendid base-line driving he took the set 6—3. Ward, almost sat on thf net, waiting for the New Zealander' s returns, but Wilding's driving was hard, low, and so well placed that the American \vas passed badly. In the second set Ward seemed to gauge Wilding's strokes much better, and, running in, Vvolleyed splendidly or lobbed over his opponent with remarkable accuracy whenever Wilding got in first. Ward took second set 6—3;6 — 3 ; then in the third set hjs play was perfect, and he pinned Wilding to the base-line. His wrist work and command of the court were admirable. Wilding's service went off, but even tho best troubled his opponent not at all — with a gontlo flick Ward disposed of thorn by a short drop or a deceptive shot right on the side line, following everything to the net and killing regularly. When -the sot went to Ward 6—o,6 — 0, onlookers reckoned the match was practically over, but Wilding's wonderful physique told its tale in tho end. In tho fourth set it was j even going from ono all up to four all, and then Wilding mado it 5—4 with his service. Ward tired perceptibly and lost his service and set after a deuce game at 6—4. Two sets all. The fifth and final set opened with Ward going great guns ; he placed all round Wild- j ing with apparent confidence and complete accuracy, until lie led 4—l.4 — 1. Wilding, getting into his drive somewhat better, topk the sixth game by good passing shots, and also won the seventh game. A great battle then ensued for the eignth game, aad after a number of j deuces Ward got it — 5—3.5 — 3. Wilding seemed to improve now, and he had Ward on the run — in fact, for three games Wilding did as ho liked, taking tho scoro to 6—56 — 5 in his favour. The New Zealander's magnificent cross-court drives, which oven Ward's agility could not intercept, enabled him to get the upper hand, and he maintained a wonderful nerve when behind. Ward rallied, and 6 nil was called, but the fateful thirteenth game went to Wilding, and then Ward lost the next game when standing 30 — 40 by making a double fault. Without doubt this win is tho New Zealandev's greatest triumph. Ward last year took the first two sets, 9—7,9 — 7, 6—4,6 — 4, off H. L. Doherty in the challenge round for tho Davis Cup, in what was considered ono of the finest contests over seen at Wimbledon, therefore the young Now Zealander can be justly proud of his win. Both countries had now won 'two matches, and all depended upon Poidevin against Little. Tho latter won the first set easily 6—2.6 — 2. but Poidevin caused a flutter, by jumping out in the second set with splendid driving and volleying, which gave him set, 6—l.6 — 1. He led 4—24 — 2 in the next set, but after 5 all was called, Little won 7—5.7 — 5. After two all had been called j in tho fourth set, Little went at it neck or nothing — bis opponent seemed to fade away M'hen tho pinch came, and -the set wont to America, 6—2.6 — 2. This! meant I match, 3 .-sets to 1, and thus the Americans won by 3 events to 2. The complete score of the match between Poidevin and Little does not convoy an idea of tho very plucky manner in which tho Australian, short of first-class practice, 6tuck throughout to his doughty opponent. Poidevin is really a better cricketer than a tennis player, and represents Lancashire County. 'Miss D. K. Douglas beat 'Miss May Sutton (America), 7—5,7 — 5, 6—2, at Liverpool for the Northern Championship. Miss Sutton was tho holder. It was a great maU»h, and details will bo given next week. Miss Douglass and Riseley beat Miss Thomson and Smith, 7—5,7 — 5, 5—7, 6—3,6 — 3, in tho challenge round for the All England Mixed Doubles Championship — played at Liverpool. I A. F. Wilding beat E. Watson, 6—l, 6—o, 6—l,6 — 1, in the final of tho open singles at tho •Sheffield and Hallamshire Club's tournament. F. Wilding, the father of the young crack, was beaten in tho third round by Abbatt, 6—2,6 — 2, 2—6,2 — 6, 6—l. E. Watson beat Abbatfc, 6—2, 6—2, then younrr Wilding won as obovo. Wilding and Wilding (father and son) won final of doubles from Webster and Moss, 6—3, 6—4, 4—6, 6—3. Wilding pore is described as having an excellent reverse twist service, lobs well, and

plays with preat steadiness. 'Mrs. Kemp beat 'Miss Wilding, A — 6, B—s (retired), in open singles. Mrs. Kemp was beaten in semi-final by Mra. Clegs, 3—6, 6—l,6 — 1, 6—4.6 — 4. Miss Wilding (scr) lost in second round handicap singles to Miss Morton (owes 3—6), 6—l, 6-4. E. barker dislocated his knee at Perth last, week when playing in a club double. He charged in for a smash, and, having made his stroke, was by the momentum of his run carried on to the net. It was in the muscular strain and struggle to avoid this that he dislocated his knee. He fell helpless across the net, breaking through the suspending wire, and was picked up in excruciating pain, and although progressing favourably, according to latest news, it is doubtful if hs will be able to play, at all events with any degree of confidence, in the forthcoming interstate match against New South Wales at Perth in Octobei. Parker is West Australia's champion player, and being young gave excellent promise for the future. 'Ho is no relation to H. A. Parker, the New Zealand champion, who resides in Sydney. Miss D. Udy, of Auckland has replied that she is prepared to accept a place in the New Zealand team, if selected for the contest at Christmas.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

AMERICA v. AUSTRALASIA. SPLENDID PLAY OF A. F. WILDING., Evening Post, Volume LXXII, Issue 24, 28 July 1906

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AMERICA v. AUSTRALASIA. SPLENDID PLAY OF A. F. WILDING. Evening Post, Volume LXXII, Issue 24, 28 July 1906

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