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1905. DIARY OF EVENTS. WELLINGTON.

Jan. 2. — Yacht Te Aroha capsized of Wellington Heads ; three lives lost. Jan. 6.— Meeting in Town Hall to ar- I range for assistance to sufferers from Australian bushfires. Jan. 23. — City Council decided on exten- , sions of tramway service to Brooklyn, j liland Bay, and Kilbirnio. Jan. 26. — D.I.C. premises destroyed by fire. Feb. 28.— Execution of James W. Ellis at Terrace Gaol for murder of Leonard i Colhnson at Te Awaiti on 26th Feb., | 1904. ! March 2.— Opening of Rifle Championship Meeting at Trentham. March 2.— Opening of Methodist Conference in Wellington. March 8. — jUilroy, of Nelson, won Rifle Championship ; T. Jack, Challenge Cup. March 26. — Destruction of Berhampore Public School by fire. April 6. — Mr. F. M. B. Fisher returned for Wellington City. i April 12. — Loan proposals of £225,000 for destructor, lighting, and water schemes adopted; library extension and Kelburne Park schemes rejected. April 22. — Proposal to introduce electric 'bus.es into Karori rejected by 210 to 104. April 24. — King George of Tonga visited Wellington. April 27.— Mr. T. W. Hislop elected Mayor of Wellington. April 27.— Bisley rifle team left. April 28. — General Booth arrived at Wellington April 29. — Statue of Queen Victoria unveiled jn Wellington. April 29.— ; General Booth welcomed by the Ministry at a reception at Parliament House. May 1. — Mr. Seddon completed his twelfth year of Premiership. May 2. — Large deputation waited on Premier to protest against Shops and Offices Bill. May 3. — Meeting 6f Miramar ratepayers approved proposal to borrow £36,000 for borough improvements. May 9.— Meeting of Post and Telegraph Association Conference. May 26. — Public welcome in Town Hall to Rev. L. M. Isitt. May 29. — Large public meeting protested against Shops and Offices Act. June s.— Dental Conference opened in Wellington. June 7.— Opening of new Custom House. June 12.— Father Hays addressed a crowded meeting at the Town Hall. > June 20.— Mr. Seddon celebrated his 60th birthday. June 27.— Last session of Fifteenth Parliament opened. July 3.— Annual meeting Municipal Association. [ July 5. — Colonial Prohibition Convention. July 10. — Fourth annual Colonial Conference of Farmers' Union. July 17. — Agricultural Conference. July 27. — Third annual Conference of Acclimatisation Society. July 28. — Mr. Fisher, of New Liberals, made serious charges in the House against the Government. July 29. — Departure of New Zealand Football Team for England. s Aug. 3. — Bible-in-schools demonstration in -Town Hall. Aug. 10. — Annual Conference of Harbour Board Association. Aug. 14. — "New Liberals" held large meeting in the Town Hall. Aug. 22. — Dispute concerning church property at meeting of Trustees of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Aug. 30. — Auditor-General reported to Parliament that, search having been made, no trace of alleged voucher could be found. Aug. 30.— Mr. J. P. Luke elected to vacancy on City Council. Sept. 5. — Apology from Mr. Fisher in reference to voucher charges read in Parliament.' Sept. 13. — Education Boards Conference. Sept. 20. — Supplementary loan of £22,000 for suburban tramways carried. Sept. 24 — Chinaman murdered in Hain-ing-street by Lionel Terry, Sept. 30: — Fire at Hutt; three shops and two dwellings destroyed. Oct. 3.— Mr. J. E. Page, City Treasurer, retired. Oct. 18. — Audit Commission opened. Oct. 201 — Determined stonewall in House on Criminal Code Amendment Bill. Oct. 25. — Hutt drainage loan proposal approved. Oct. 25. — Workers' Dwellings Bill passed Legislative Council. Oct. 31. — Parliament prorogued. Nov. 3. — Hospital Sunday collection (including State subsidy) over £800. Nov. 21. — Lionel Terry sentenced to death for murder of Chinaman. Dec. 3.— Two youths, George Ellis and Ernast Lake, drowned at Island Bay. Dec. 6.— General elections ; Messrs. F. M. B. Fisher, J. G. W. Aitken, C. M. Izard, W. H. P. Barber, T. M. Wilford, and W. H. Field returned for Wellington electorates. Dec. 18.— Terry's death sentence commuted to imprisonment for life. Dec. 25.— Miss Lockie killed in carriage accident. Dec. 27.— George R. Fossette drowned at Kaitoke. NEW ZEALAND. Jan. 17. — Wreck of s.s. Nambucca on Tom's Rock near Sinclair Heads. Feb. 11. — Opening of tour of Australian Eleven at Auckland. Feb. 13. — Opening of Roman Catholic Cathedral, Christchurch. Feb. 13.->-Australian Cricket Team defeated Auckland by 160 and an innings. Feb. 14.— Band Contest (North Island) at Auckland. • Feb. 20.— Cricket Match Australia v Wellington — a draw. Feb. 20,— Land Commisswß started on its North Island tojir. Feb. 27.— Australian cricketers defeated Chribtchurch by eight wickets and one run. March 18. — Australian cricketers defeated Isew Zealand by ' one wicket and 358 runs. April 13.— Opening of the GisborneKaraka Railway. April 19.— Compensation Courb gave judgment in Fluxbourns Estate oase: £335,000 claimed ; £181 675 (including costs) awarded. April 19. — Mr. Masscy addre6sed a large and enthusiastic meeting in Dunedin. Apiil 27.— Municipal elections. May 7. — New Roman Catholic ( Church opened at Invercargill. May 9. — Otaki Post Office opened. May 12.— Farmers' Union Conference at Auckland. May 17.— Piinemoa arrived at Lyttelton with castaways ofl barque Anjou, wrecked at Auckland Islands sth February. Crew of 22 all saved. June 5. — "New Liberal Party" formed at Christchurch. June 5. — Papanui section Christchurch tramways opened. June 14. —Mr. W. P. Reeves, AgentGeneral for New Zealand, appointed vllighv lligh Commissioner. June 23. — Gales and floods throughout the colony. June 24.— Extraordinary floods at Greymouth ; great damage done. June 25. — Railway accident near Kaiapoi; two lives lost. Julqr 9.— Riot in Chrißtchurca— crowd

of two thousand attempted to rescue a prisoner. Sept. 13. — Labour party held anti-trust meeting in Christchurch. Oct. 21. — Trafalgar Centenary celebrated throughout the colony. Oct. 20.— Wreck of County of Ayr. Oct. 2. — Foundation-stone of new Nelbon College building laid by Lord Plunket. Not. 4.— Hutt loan of £52,000 for drainage, water supply scheme, etc., carried. Nov. 13. — Audit Commission reported to Governor. Nov. 27.— Resignation of Mr. Gilruth, Chief Government Veterinarian. Nov. 29. — Foundation-stone of new Berhampore School laid. Nov. 29. — Premier issued a manifesto in view of general election. Nov. 30.— Large landslip on ,Hutt-Pe-tone railway line. Doc. 6. — General election. Mr. Seddon's Administration practically swept the poll. Local option vote showed continued advance, but not to extent anticipated by temperance party. Two new districts carried prohibition by the requisite majority of three-fifths. December 24. — Kapanui run down in Auckland Harbour. Five lives lost. AUSTRALIA. Jan. 3. — Mining dispute in New South Wales. Some sis thousand miners on strike. Jan. 5. — Damage by bush fires in Australia estimated at £100,000. Jan. 6. — Aibitration Court imposed penalty on Federated Miners' Union and ordered work to be resumed. Jan. 26.— Wheelers resumed work. Jan. 31. — All collieries except Lambton B mine at work. Feb. 3. — Postmaster-General announces details of new poundage mail arrangements. Feb. 6. — Conference of Premiers at Hobart. Feb. 6.— Orient liner Orontes refused i Australian mails. Feb. 7.— -Political Labour Conference adopted fighting platform. Feb. 10. — Mr. Justice O'Connor, of the High Court, appointed President of Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Court. Feb. 10.— Commonwealth reopened negotiations with Orient Company for carriage of mails. Feb. 16. — Orient liner Orizaba went ashore at Garden Island. Feb 22.— Orient Company notified that future steamers outwards will not call at Adelaide. March 2. — Instructions issued that Maoris visiting Australia are not to be treated as undesirable aliens. March 22.— Serious outbreak of dengue fever in Brisbane, many prominent citizens prostrated. April 2.— Heavy gales and rain in New South Wales. April 3.— Hon. T.M. Slattery, M.L.C., sentenced to three and a-half years' imprisonment with hard labour for breach of trust. April 4. — Australian mail dispute settled, the Commonwealth agreeing to pay the Orient Company a subsidy of £120,000. ' April 4.— General Booth arrived in Australia. April 23.— High Court of Australia decided that litigants might appeal diiect to High Court without intervention of Full Court. April 30.— Mr. Reid, Federal Premier, issued an anti-socialist manifesto. May 1. — Cable communication with Caroline Islands opened. May 4. — Parliament of South Australia dissolved. Miy 15. — Meeting of manufacturing chemists and other* protested against New Zealand Government's regulation concerning patent medicines. May 16. — Government issued new regulations, based on Dr. Roth's report, regarding the treatment of aborigines. June 7. — Vancouver mail contract arranged by Commonwealth Government. June 16.'— Football match between New' Zealand Association and Metropolitan Eleven, the latter winning by 3 goals to 2. June 28.— Opening of Federal Parliament. June 28.— Sentence, against Mr. Slattery quashed by High Court. Juno 30. — Reid Government defeated on Address-in-Reply, by 42 to 25, on amendment moved by Mr. Deakin. July 4. — The Governor-General having refused a dissolution, Reid Government resigned. July 4. — Four thousand unemployed in Sydney. July 6. — Deakin Cabinet sworn in. July 6. — West/ Australian Parliament opened. July 12. — New Zealand Rugby team defeated Metropolitan Union by 22 points to 3. July 20. — Queensland Parliament opened. July 22. — Sculling championship won by Stanbury. July 25 — South Australian Ministry defeated by 24 to 17 on motion by Mr. Price. Mr. Price sent for. July 25. — Lord Chelmsford appointed Governor of Queensland. Aug. 10. — Important resolution regarding New Hebrides carried in Federal House of Representatives. Aug. 10.— W. D. Willis, land agent, arrested at Sydney on charge of falae pretences. Bail fixed at £1000. Aug. 21. — Rason Ministry, West Australia, defeated on Midland Railway purchase proposals. Sept. 6. — Terrible storms in New South Wales. Sept. 15.— General Booth offered to send five thousand families to settle in Australia. Sept. 22. — Commonwealth Premier intimated to Geenral Booth, his approval of his offer. Sept. 25. — Extraordinary snowstorm in Melbourne. • ,& Sept. 25. — Naughton, a New Zealander, sentenced to five years' imprisonment for lottery fraud with a "trick" box. Oct. 1. — Queen Cross Mine, Charters Towers, blown up by dynamite. Oct. 4. — General Booth's scheme warmly discussed in Federal House of Representatives. Oct. 6.— Dissolution granted, Western Australia. Oct. 18. — Federal Government approved scheme of military training colleges. Oct. 20.— Senate, by 16 to 11, adopted Irish Home Rule resolution. Oct. 29. — Compromise having been arrived at, Now South Waleo Assembly passed Local Option Bill. Oct. 29. — Fire, followed by terrible explosion, at Stanford Merthyr mine, West Mnitlnnd, New South Wales. Several lives lost. Oct. 31 — W. D." Willis remanded from Dm bun to Sydney. Oct. 31. — Western Australian elections gave Ministers 34 seats against 13. Nov. 3 — 'Tusmnniun Assembly abandoned Taxation Bill owing to amendments by Legislative Council. Nov. 10.— Wreck of La Bella on Warrnnmbool coast, and rescue of five men, by fisherman, William Ferrier. Nor 16. — Determined stonewall in Federal House of Representatives on Trade Marks Bill, in opposition to the "union label" deletion accepted by the Premier. Three members resigned in protest. Nov. 16. — Federal Senate rejected Sir Josinh Symons's Bill abolishing nn itinerary High Court in appellate jurisdiction.

Nov. 17. — Destructive bushfires in various parts of Australia. Nov. 19. — Cyclonic storm caused great havoc in Maitland district, New South Wales. Nov. 20.— Close of stonewall on union label clause. Nov. 24. — New closure Standing Order carried in Federal House of Representatives. Dec. 6. — Union label clause carried in Federal House of Representatives by 26 to 22. Dec. 8. — Cyclonic storm in Queensland ; four inches rain in one hour at Brisbane ; great damage done. Dec. 16. — Contract Immigrant Bill parsed Federal House. Dec. 16.— Electoral Bill and Sugar Excise Bill passed Federal House. Dec. 22. — Federal Parliament prorogued. UNITED KINGDOM. Jan. 12 — Dredge Texas foundered in Bay of Biscay ; 21 lives lost. • Jan. 13. — Sir Ihoinas Lipton's Glasgow store burnt ; damage, £30,000. Jan. 17. — Blizzard raged over United Kingdom and Continent of Euiope. Jan. 19. — Collision Leeds-London and Glasgow-London expresses; 7 killed, 40 injured. Jan. 19. — Marquis of Bath appointed Parliamentary Under-Secretary for India. Feb. 13.— Prince of Wales' appointed Warden of Cinque Ports. Feb. 14. — Biitish Parliament opened by the King. Feb. 17.— Government arrapged the purchase provincial interests of National Telephone Company. March 1. — Official announcement of resignation by Loid Miluer of Commissionership of South Africa, March 2. — Lord Selborne appointed High Commissioner of South Africa. March 13. — Mrs. Chadwick convicted on various charges, including the forgery of a promissory note for £1,000,000. March 25. — House of Lords decided appeal in Ogden tobacco case in favour of retail dealers. March 26.— Mr. Joseph Walton's motion condemning Mr. Balfour's policy of fiscal retaliation carried in House of Commons. April 11.— Mr. Austen Chamberlain's, budget showed a surplus of £1,414,000. April 21. — Manifesto issued by certain Anglican clergyman claiming recognition of results of higher biblical criticism and greater tolerance of advanced ideas. April 23. — Draft of new Constitution for the Tiansvaal published in London. ■April 28.— Mr. G. Balfour, President of Local Government Board, addressed an order to the Guardians of the Poor relating to underfed children in the schools. May 2. — Committee appointed to enquire into working of Small Holdings Act of 1892. May 4. — Australian cricketers played their first match in England. May 7. — House of Commons, by 142 to 109, negatived Bill providing for local veto in respect to liquor traffic in Scotland. May 13. — Women's Franchise Bill talked out in House of Commons. May 23. — "Scene" in House of Commons. Mr. Lyttelton, Colonial Secretary, not allowed to speak. May 25. — Unveiling of memorial in St. Paul's Cathedral in honour of colonial troopers killed in Boer War. May 26.— Zionists declined the offer of Bniiiiii territory in East Africa for colonisation purposes. May 27. — Bill closing public-houses in England all day Sunday rejected in House of Commons by 114 to 108. May 31. — England won test match, England v. Australia, by 213 runs. May 31. — Derby won by Lord Rc*sebery's Cicero. June -s.— Five hundred unemployed of Leicester began a maich to London. June 6.— King Aitonso of Spain arrived in London. June 7. — Court of Appeal decided that the De Beers Consolidated Mines, Limited, were liable for assessment of income-tax in the United Kingdom. June 8. — Submarine AB, while exercising at Plymouth, exploded and sank. j June 8. — Bill for settlement of Scottish I Cnurch dispute introduced into House of Commons. , June 9. — Mr. J. W. Lowther chosen to j succeed Mr. Gully as Speaker of House of Commons. " June 15. — Blue Book issued disclosing grave scandals in connection with army contracts i» South Africa. June 16. — Eleven men injured by explosion on battleship Magnificent. June 16. — Marriage of Prince Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden to Princess Margaret i of Connaught. June 17. — Second cricket test match, England and Australia, abandoned. June 19. — British Ambassador at Petersburg asked for reparation for sinking of steamer St. Kilda by Russian cruiser i Kniefa. Juno 20. — J. B. Burke, Cambridge Laboratory, experimenting in radiobiology, produced forms resembling organisms, provisionally called "radiobes." j June 21. — Unemployed Workmen's Bill read a second time in House of Commons. Hostile amendment rejected by 228 to 11. June 23. — Sir Neville Gerald Lyttelton resigned his position as Chief of General Staff. June 23. — Extended powers given to Lord Kitchener in India. Jun« 23.*— Cable Conference opened in London. June 27. — British steamer Ancona sank Danish training ship Georg&tage off Kastrup. Twenty cadets drowned. June 30. — Lord Avebury's Sunday Closing Bill negatived in the House of Lords by 25 to 14. July 12. — Princess of Wales gave birth to a son. July 12.— First Baptist World Conference opened at Exeter 9.a11, London. July 14. — Salford Docks opened , July 18. — Mr. Bzilfour withdrew pro-,, posala for redistribution of seats. * July 18. — Deputation from 800 wives to Mr. Balfour and Sir H. Campbell-Ban-nerman urged passing of Unemployed Bill, July 21. — Government defeat in House of Cominone. Aug. 1. — Intended^ resignation of Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India, announced. Aug. 4. — Aliens Bill passed House of Commons. Aug. 8. — Grand reception of French fleet at Portsmouth. Aug. 10. — Agreement with National Telephone Company confirmed by House of Commons. Aug. 11. — Naval Works Bill and Unemployed Bill passed House of Lords. Aug. 11. — Parliament prorogued. Aug. 12. — Announced that Anglo-Japa-nese Alliance had been renewed nnd j amplified. Aug. 21. — Resignation of Lord Curzon. Succeeded by Lord Minto. Sept. 27. — Mysterious murder of Miss Money in tunnel on London-Brighton Railway. Sept. 27. — Freedom of City of London conferred on General Booth. Oct. 20.— Right Hon. A. J. Balfour presented with fieedoin of the- City of Edinburgh. Nov. 4. — Gladstone Memorial •unveiled. Nov. 14.— Queen Alexandra started fund for aid of unnemployed ; large contributions received. Nov. 17.— Slight accident to King Edward on hunting-field. Nov. 29. — Roynl Commission appointed to enquire into the working of the Poor Law. Dec. 5. — Resignation of Mr. Balfour's [ Cabinet.

Dec. 11. — Liberal Cabinet formed by Sir I Henry Campbell-Bannerman, who took of- I fice as Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury. Secretary of State for Colonial Department, Lord Elgin. Dec. 16. — New Zealand footballers, after an unbroken series of victories, defeated by Wales. Dec. 17. — Retirement of Mr. Labouchere from political life announced. THE OUTSIDE WORLD. Jan. 12. — Strike of 70,000 colliers at Dortmund. Jan. 13. — Anglo - Austro - Hungarian Treaty signed. Jan. 26. — Blizzard in New York. Many lives lost. Jan. 31. — Three - thousand - carat diamond found in Premier Mine, Johannesburg. Feb. 9. — Dispute between Sweden and Norway ; Norway seeking permission to appoint her own foreign Consuls. Feb. 9. — Anglo-American parcel post instituted. Feb. 9. — America returned to China £4,400,000 paid as indemnity for "Boxer" | outrages. I Feb. 10.— Church Disestablishment Bill introduced by French Government. i Feb. 13. — France warned Sultan of I Morocco of possible consequence of persistent evasion of French terms. Feb. 14. — Issues submitted to Commission on the Dogger Bank outrage. Feb. 21. — Gaa explosion Alabama Steel and Wire Company's mines — 107 killed and many entombed. Feb. 24. — Report of Dogger Bank Commission signed and published. Feb. 26 — Outrages in Bulgaria. Villages pillaged and burnt. Feb. 26. — Simplon Tunnel completed. Feb. 26— Great fire Hot Springs, Arkansas. Two thousand people homeless ; many lives lost. Feb. 28. — A seventh satellite of Jupiter discovered by M. iPerrine, Lick Observatory. March 10.— Plague in India; 34,000 deaths reported in one week. March 24. — Riots in Persia. Serious rising of Mohammedans against Russians at Meshheld. April 2.— Visit of the Kaiser to Tangier. April 3.— Strike of 2000 Chinese, Randfontein mine. April 5. — Violent earthquakes in Upper India ; many villages ruined, and loss of life in Western Himalayas estimated at 13,500. April 16.— Remains, supposed to be those of Admiral Paul Jones, discovered in a Paris cemetery. April 21.— Het Yolk and Tranßvaal Responsible Government Association agreed upon a common basis of political action. April 23. — Resignation of M. Delcasse, French Minister of Foreign Affairs. May 2. — Norway insisted on recognition of right to appoint Consuls before negotiating on other disputed points. May 2.— German Government promised to revise mstrictive taxes imposed on trade with Marshall Islands. May 4. — Stromboli in violent eruption. May 8. — Treaty of friendship and commerce between Britain and Cuba signed at Havana. May 10. — Thirty people killed and 120 injured in cyclone at Marquette, Kansas. •May 12. — Tornado in Oklahoma. Town of Snyder partly destroyed and many lives lost. May 14. — Riga-Kherson Company undertook construction of Black Sea-Baltic Canal for £40,000,000. 'May 16. — Lord Selborne, High Commissioner of South Africa, arrived at Capetown. May 27. — Civil war in Afghanistan. Revolt of brother of the Emir. May 28. — King Oscar of Sweden quashed the Norwegian Consular c Bill. Ministry resigned. May 30. — Hurricane devastated Caroline Islands. Ships wrecked ; many lives lost. June 1. — Attempt on life of King Alfonso of Spain while visiting France. June 1. — Sultan of Morocco rejected French proposals and asked for conference of the .Powers. June 2. — Destructive earthquake at Scutari. Many lives lost. June 4. — Pinietown reservoir, Natal, wrecked by a cyclone ; 550 lives lost and water famine at Durban. June 5. — Religious liberty in Spain. Reformed Episcopal Church in Madrid allowed to worship with open doors. June 7. — Marriage of Crown Prince of Germany and Princess Cecile of Meck-lenburg-Schwerin. • June 7. — Dissolution of union between Sweden a&d Norway. June 9. — M. Rouvier appointed French Minister of Foreign Affairs. June 14. — M. Delyannis, Premier of Greece, assassinated. June 15. — Germany fortifying Kiaochau. June 23. — Canada requested inclusion in the terms of Anglo-Jappnese Treaty. June 25. — Tibetan indemnity question bettled between Britain and China. June 30. — Colliery explosion at Makizoff, South Russia, j 400 killed. July 4.— Cloudburst in Mexico drowned a thousand people. July 4. — Frenoh Chamber of Deputies by 341 to 233 passed Bill separating Church and State. July 7. — Elihu Root appointed American Secretary of State. July 17. — -Pius X. issued anti-Socialist encyclical. July 19. — Heat wave from Rocky Mountains to Atlantic caused many deaths, especially in cities. July 20. — Duke of Albany ascended throno of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. July 21. — In retaliation for exclusion laws, the Chinese at Shanghai instituted a general boycott of American goods. " ' July 25.— Tsar and Kaiser met in private conference on battleship in Gulf of Finland. July 25. — Lightning ignited eleven storage tanks of rjotroloum at Humble, Texa-i, and caused "terrific conflagration. Aug. 6. — Yellow fever opidemic at Now Orleans. * Aug. 11. — German convoy ambushed by Hereros. Aug. 11. — French mission attacked by Lama priests; many killed and wounded. 4ug. 14.— Famine and anarchy in Seville, Spain. Aug. 14.— Referendum in Norway in September. Pepple practically unanimous in favour. Aug. 16. — Famine throughout Andalusia. Fifteen thousand armed labourers roving the country. Aug. 17.— Attempt on life of DowagerEmpress of China. Aug. 24.— Sculler Durnan (Canadian) defeated T. Sullivan (England) in sculling contest. Aug. 25.— Japanese transport collided with British steamer and bank; 127 troops drowned. Sept. 4.— Great floods and loss of life at Shanghai. [ Sept. 4. — Porte refused to submit to international control of Macedonian finance V| Sept. 8. — Terrible earthquakes, 22,000 homeless, about 2500 lives lost, in Italy. Sept. 8. — Anti-peace riots in Tokio. Sept. 10. — Togo's flagship Mikasa blew up. Six hundrod lives lost. Sept. 13. — Anti-peace demonstration at Osaka. Sept. 17.— Prince Karl of Denmark elected to Norwegian throne. Sept. 18. — Sweden and Norway agreed to make a permanent arbitration treaty. Sept., 25.— Terrible cruelties alleged

I against M. Gentil, Agent-General in I French Congo. Sept. 27.— Typhoon at Manila. Great destruction and some loss of life. Sept. 25. — Political crisis in Hungary. Sept. 21. — Serious outbreak of cholera in Prussia. Sept. 28. — Franco-German agreement on subject of -Moroccan Conference signed in Paris. Sept. 28. — Foundered dynamite-laden steamer Chatham, obstructing Suez Canal, blown up. Oct. 2. — Strike in Berlin affecting 35,000 workers. Oct. 11. — British steamer Labo lost in collision with floating mine off Shantung. Oct. 16.— Grand Duke Cyril dismissed from Russian army. Oct. 19.— Enterprise National Bank of Alleghany, Pennsylvania, suspended payment with three million dollars liabilities. The cashier committed suicide Oct. 23. — Completion of railway between Atbara. and Port Soudan, near Suakim. Oct. 29. — Spanish armoured cruiser Cardinal Cisneros sunk in fog. Oct. 31. — Britibh expedition against Nandi tribe, East Africa, killed 250 natives, and captured large quantity of cattle. Nov. 4. — Prince Nicholas voluntarily established a Parliament in Montenegro. Nov. 14.— Lock-out in textile and dyeing trades in Saxony and Thuringa; 65,000 people out of work. Nov. 19.— -German torpedo-boat 5126 sank in collision with cruiser Undine. Thirty lives lost. Nov. 20.— The new King (Karl) of Norway assumed the ancient royal name of Hakon (the Seventh). Nov. 20.— Wreck of steamer Hilda in Gulf of St. Malo, only five escaped. Mrs Butler, wife of Hon. .H. C. Butler,' among the drowned. Nov. 21. — German imperial deficit for the year £4,000,000 sterling, and large increase in taxation necessitated by military and naval expenditure. Nov. 28. — Sultan continuing obdurate, combined international fleet seized Mitylene. Dec, 6. — The Porte gave way, accepting the scheme of financial control of Macedonia. Dec. 6. — Four missionaries murdered at Liau-chou. Dec. 14. — Chinese Btudents leaving Japan. Dec. 14.— German forces defeated 2000 "natives in East Africa. Dec. 20. — Disturbances at Shanghai. Missionaries recalled from interior. Dec. 21.— Important treaty between Japan and China. THE RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR. Dec. 31, 1904. — Japanese captured Lung Shushan, H Fort, and a new fort at Pan Langshan, thereby securing control of the whole western -half of the eastern fort' ridge at Port Arthur. Jan. 1, 1905.— General Stoessel made overtures for surrender of Port Arthur. Jan. 2 — Formal terms of surrender of Port Arthur concluded. Jan. 3. — Japanese took formal possession. Jan. 8. — Transfer of prisoners at Port Arthur completed; 878 officers and 23,491 men surrendered. Jan. 10. — Disastrous mine explosion at Port Arthur. Jan. 28. — Extensive engagement between forces in Manchuria. Jan. 29. — Russian repulse; Kuropatkin's troops driven out of Sandepas, and forced back across the Hun, with heavy loss. Feb. 5. — Russian General Gripenberg resigned command to General Wiloff. Japanese captured Heihoutai. Feb. 8. — General Gr-ipenberg charged General Kuropatkin with utter incapacity. Feb. 14. — Further Japanese advances in Manchuria. Yladivostock declared in state of siege. Admiral Togo sailed from Kure. Feb. 16. — General Bilderling succeeded General Kaulbars in command of Third Army in Manchuria. Feb. 23. — Japanese captured Tzinzelite Pass. March 3. — Heavy fighting in Manchuria. Japanese occupied strategic positions on the Sha-ho. March 4. — Pitched battle between 550,000 Japanese and 300,000 Russians. Mukden isolated. jMarch 5. — Japanese drove Russian army across the Hun-ho, capturing huge supplies of ammunition. March 6. — Japanese seized Sin-mu-ting. March 9. — Russians evacuated whole line of Sha-ho. In full retreat from Mukden ; losses during ten days estimated at 34,000. March 10. — Japanese occupied Mukden ; took 100 guns and 15,000 prisoners. March 16.— Japanese occupied Tieling. March 17. — General Kuropatkin recalled; succeeded by General Linevitch. April 4.— General Linevitch advised European non-combatants to leave Kharbin. April 7.— Baltic fleet under Rozhdestvensky passed Singapore. April 22. — Owing to pressure from French authorities, the Russian fleet left Kainranh Bay. , v April 23. — 'Russians advanced south of Chang-tu and Kai-yuan, but, being defeated, retreated north. April 27. — Fleet returned to Kamranh Bay, German colliers supplying coal. ) April 28. — Fleet again left Kamranh Bay. May ' 4. — Nebogatoff's squadron passed through Straits of Malacca, heading north. May 27-28. — Decisive naval battle in Sea of Japan. Russian fleet almost annihilated. 14,000 Russians went down with ships, 3000 prisoners, including Admirals Rozhdestvensky. and Nebogatoff ; Admiral Voelkersham killed. Japanese lost three torpedo boats and about 800 men. Russian ships captured or dehtroyed valued by Admiralty at £18,000,000 sterling. June 16. — Further Japanese advances in Manchuria ; enveloping movement in progress. July B.— Japanese took possession of Island of Saghalien. Russian commander blew up defences, and burnt Government buildings before retiring. July 10. — Russians burned Korsakovsk, the capital of Saghalien, and retreated north. July 13.— M. de Witte elected to represent Russia at Peace Conference. Aug. 7. — Japanese and Russian plenipotentiaries met on board the Mayflower. Aug. 29. — Peace arranged between Japan and Russia. Sept. I.— Official announcement of armistice. Sept. s.— Peace treaty signed. Oct. 14.— Peace Treaty signed by Tsar and Mikado. THE REVOLT IN RUSSIA. Jan. 10.— Demand for reinstatement of unionists dismissed from Puliloff ironworks, St. Petersburg. Jan. I,'— Strike of 12,000 hands at Putiloff works. Jan. 18. — University of Moscow closed on account of revolt of students. Jan. 19. — Warsaw railway hands join strike. Jan. 20. — Strikers sent loyal address to Tsar, setting forth their desperate condition. Jan. 20. — Tsar saluted with a, shrapnel shell by First Horse Artillery Corps. Jan. 22 ("Red Sunday ").— Eight thousand workers conveying petition to Tsar and large crowds of spectators fired upon and dispersed by cavalry in St. Petersburg. Hundreds killed and wounded.

Jan. 23,— Tsar and family rotired to Livadia. "'■' Jan. 24.f^-Life .of Grand Duke Sergius attempted. „''-•' v ■ Jan. '25. — General Trepoff appointed ■ Governor-Greneral of St. Petersburg. Jan. ,25.— Great workmen's, riots at I HelsingJ.ors, Finland. Jan..98.-£-Publication of newspapers in Warsaw stopped. Jan. 28.— Strike of 60,000 workers at Riga. Fatal riots. Jan. 30.— British Consulate at Warsaw attacked. Anti-British placards at Libau. Sir Charles Hardmge demanded explanation and protection. Feb. 1. — Prince Mirski, 'Minister of Interior, resigned. Feb. 6.— Further strikes— 4oo,ooo workmen involved. Feb. 6.— Kieff University closed. Feb. 8. — Mobilisation of Polish troops interrupted. Feb. 9.— 'General strike at Irkutsk, Siberia. ' "* Feb. 14. — Extraordinary demonstration at annual ball of Engineering Institute, Moscow. Feb. 17. — Assassination of Grand Duke Sergius at Moscow. Feb. 28.— Anti-Semitic riots at Theodosia; many murdered. Feb. 28. — Polish peasantry joining strikers, and demanding right to retain their language. March 2.— Sixty thousand on strike at Moscow; 83 factories idle. Strike of a quarter of a million miners at Donet-s. Dynamite magazine seized. March 6. — Arrest of strike leaders at Warsaw. March 10. — Commissioner of Police at Warsaw shot dead. March 13 — Bands of peasants, Orel Province, pillaging estates, and sacking refineries and distilleries. March 16. — British Government claimed £100,000 for sinking of Knight Commander. March 24.— Peaceful assembly of 140 peasant men and women at Kutno fired on by police — many killed and wounded. March 27.— Town of Yalta fired by rioters, and prisoners liberated. March 28. — Nobles of Moscow demanded a National Assembly; flight of many Polish nobles. March 31. — Tsar suspended enforcement of conscription in Finland for three years. April 2.-* Tsar established irremovableness of Finland Judges. April s.— Extensive arrests of "In tellectuals " by General Trepoff. April 6. — Resignation of Pobiedonostzeff, Procurator of the Holy Synod. April 10. — Tereschenko's sugar refineries burnt— damage £4,000,000. April 21. — National Progressive Party submitted moderate programme of reform. April 24.— Price of bread in Moscow increased threefold owing to strike of 15,000 bakers. Strike lasted till 27th. April 30. — Ukase issued cancelling peasants' debts amounting to 75,000,000 roubles, owing to bad harvest. May s^~Representatives of Zemstvos assembled at Moscow to formulate a new charter. May 9. — Terrible massacre of Jews, lasting three days, at Zhitomir. May 18. — Kalaieff hanged for murder of Grand Dukev Sergius. May 18. — Plague at Kharbin ; 300 deaths daily. May 24. — Plot reported at Kieff to kidnap the Tsarevitch and hold him as hostage for reforms. ! May 25. — Prince Nakachildze (suspected of complicity in Baku massacres), killed by a bomb. May 31. — lireut strikes in Baltic Provinces and riots at Lodz. June 6. — Ukase issued virtually placing life and liberty in Russia at the mercy of General Trepoff. June 10. — Riots at Minsk. A hundred people shot. June 16. — Grand Duke Alexis resigned Commandership-in-Chief of Russian Navy. June 19. — "Last appeal" from Russian people to Tsar for reforms and peace. June 20. — Zemstvo deputation by the Tsar. His rep^V mutilated by censor in published version. _ June 22. — ■Anti-GoVemment demonstration at Lodz by fifty thousand people. Cossacks and dragoons the crowd, killing between two*' and three hundred. " ",--, - f^CT," , June 26. — Slaughter of Jews • by' Cossacks at Lodz. Panic in\jthe city; twelve thousand inhabitants,->fledl June 27. — Twenty thousand Jews, left Lodz. June 29. — Mutiny on Russian battleship Kniaz Potemkin at Odessa. Crew killed officers and took charge. Appalling riots in the city. Many buildings burnt, and ships set on fire in harbour. June 30. — Damage at Odessa estimated at £2,500,000, and 1800 lives lost. Tsar declared a state of war in the district. July 10. — Surrender of Kniaz Potemkin. July 11. — Count Schouvaloff, Prefect of Moscow, assassinated. July 17. — Mutiny of troops at Ekaterinburg. July 30. — M. Durnovo appointed Gov-ernor-General of Moscow. Aug. 2. — General Reims at Odessa torn to pieces by his men. Aug. 16. — Couriand peasants sacked municipal buildings and seized State money. Aug. 18 — Ukase issued establishing National Duma. Aug. 22. — Distress and famine reported through failure of crops in twentythree provinces. Aug. 25. — Martial law throughout Warsaw. Sept. 8. — Tartar rising in Baku. Sept. 9. — First official publication of terms of peace. Sept 21.-50,008 Persian workmen expelled from Baku. Oct. 5. — Moscow University closed by authorities. Oct B.— Collision at Moscow between Cossacks and strike demonstrators. Many killed and wounded. Oct. 9. — Further Cossack outrages in Moscow, many women and children killed. Oct. 11. — Russian revolutionaries endeavouring to organise a general strike. Oct. 21. — General strike began at Moscow. Traffic on railways suspended. Oct. 26. — Railway strike extending; communication with Germany suspended. Fifteen hundred people killed in conflict with troops at Eketarinoslav. Oct. 23. — Warsaw isolated.^ Nov. 2. — General strike began in Finland. Nov. 2. — Explosion of two hundred bombs at Nikolavieff, a naval station. Nov. 3. — Press censorship abolished at St. Petersburg. Nov. 4. — Outrage on Jews renewed at Kishineff. Hundreds killed and wounded, and" houses and places of business destroyed. Nov. 6. — Prince Oblensky succeeded Pobeidonosteff as Procurator of Hols; Synod. fi jtfjNov. 7. — Fearful massacre of Jews at yliflis; thousands s.lain; whole communities exterminated. Nov. 8. — Extensive famine in southwest provinces. Nov. B.— At Kieff 2500 Jews killed and wounded, a thousand women outraged and strangled. Nov. 10. — Revolt at Kronstadt; sanguinary conflict between troops and people ; half the town in flames. Nov. 12. — Mutiny at Vladivostock ; 400 killed ; town in ashes. Nov. 13 — Terrible rioting at Lobozau in Bessarabia. Town completely destroyed. Nov. 13. — Martial law in Poland. Nov. 16. — Newspapers in St. Petersburg stopped publication. Strike general.

Nov. •£?), — Run on St. Petersburg Say. ings BanJtfj^Qtb.er banks saved the situation. *&s£sg"s Nov. 22.<~N<m>3 Vremya office seized by strikers. ' Dec. 7.— General Sakharoff assassinated by a youth disguised as a woman. Dec. 14.— -Livonian Republic established in Baltic provinces. Dec. 14. — Count Ignatieff arrested ob charge of treason. Doc. 15. — Outbreak at Riga. Municipal buildings and many houses destroyed, Dec. 21. — General strike on railways, and general rising in Baltic provinces. Dec. 22. — Kharkoff municipality voted £1000 to strikers. Moscow dominated by revolutionaries. Battle at Elizabethpol between Armenians and Tartars, 2000 killed. Dec. 27.— Pitched battle in Moscow. Fifteen hundred killed and wounded. Fierce street fighting in Warsaw and St. Petersburg. BEYOND THE COLONY. Jan. 5. — Madame Belle Cole, American singer. Jan. 9.— Louise Michel, French revolutionary. Jan. 11.— Professor W. T. Matthews, artist. Jan. 15.— Robert Swain Gifford, land* scape artist and etcher. Jan. 15. — Karl Alexander, reigning Prince of Lippe-Detmold. Jan. 16. — Lord Cairns. Jan. 17. — Bennett, ex-champion bil« liardist. Jan. 19. — G. H. Boughton, painter. Jan. 22. — Robert Brough, painter. Jan. 22. — Lord Kinross, President Scottish Court of Session. Feb. 15.— General L*w Wallace, popular American author. Feb. 17.— Grand Duke Sergius, uncli of the Tsar. Feb. 22.— Captain T. B. Addington, formerly Commander H.M.S. Phoebe, Australian Squadron. Feb. 27.— Sir Thomas Wemyss Reid, author and journalist. Feb. 28.— Guy Boothby, popular novelist. March 14.— Marquis of Anglesey. March 20. — Baron yon Hamersteia Loxten, Prussian Minister of Interior. March 24.— Jules Verne, French author. * March 24.— Taracchi, Italian sculptor. Maich 25. — Maurice Barrymore, actor. March 28. — Lord Norton. April 4. — Alphonse Favier, French missioner Pekin. April 9.— Miss Sarah C. Wordswortfr ("Susan Coolidge"), American author. April 20.— Rev. S. D. F. Sabnond, Principal United Free Church College, Scotland. April 23. — Joseph Jefferson, veteraa American actor. May 8. — Charles Arnold, actor. ' May 23. — Mrs. Mary Livermore, American social reformer. May 26. — Baron Alphonse de Roths* child, Paris. May 29. — Leon Caron, composer. May 29.— J. F. O'Brien, M.P. May 29. — Lord Grimthorpe. June 13. — Archduke Joseph of Austria. June 13.— Theodore P. Delyannis, Premier of Greece. >■ June 13. — Baron Nathaniel do Rothschild, Vienna. June 15. — Tippo Tib, notorious Congo slave-dealer. • June 17. — Maxim Gomez, Cuban liberator. June 25. — A. C. Gregory, ex-surveyor and explorer, Queensland. July I.— Colonel John Hay, United States Secretary of State. July 5. — Piofessor J. J. Elisee Reclus, French geographer. July 19. — Earl Cowper, formerly Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Aug. 2. — Rev. Rainsford Bavin, formerly of New Zealand. Aug. 15. — "Pete" Hughes, theatrical manager. Aug. 21. — W. A. Bougerreau, celebrafc. Ed French painter. Aug. 22.— Alfred Waterhou6e, R.A. Aug. 22. — J. P. Dowling, Sydney, journalist. Sept. 19. — Dr. George Macdonald, preacher, novelist, and poet. Sept. 20.— Dr. T. J. Barnardo, philanthropist. ' Sept. 25. — Godefroy Cavaignac, former French AUnlster_of War. SeM?iiP' —^ ran^ £ Beard, American il« SepX 29. — Miss Flora Stevenson, Scot-v tish educationist. Sept. 29.— T. Edgar •Pemberton, drar aaatist and novelist. Oct. 2.— Hon. William Henry Sutton^ Oct. 6. — Edhem Pacha, former Com-mander-in-Chief of Turkish Army. Oct. 13. — Sir Henry Irving, actor. Oct. 15. — Bishop Ellicott, learned com-! mentator. Oct. 28. — Professor Copeland, Astro* nomer-Royal of Scotland. Oct. 28. — Rudolf Lehman, artist. Oct. 31. — Sir Bryan O'Loghlen, Vie« torian ex-Premier. Nov. 7. — Sir G. Williams, founder of Young Men's Christian Association. Nov. 17. — Philippe, Count of Fwnders. Dec. 3. — Sir Clinton Dawkins, chairman of Committee on War Office Reorganisation. Dec. B.— Lady Rawson, wife of Governor of New South Wales. Dec. 10. — Sir Richard Claverhous* Jebb. NEW ZEALAND. Jan. 5. — John Plimmer, early Welling* ton, settler. Jan. 26. — Capt. Scott, % Nelson pio-t neer. Jan. 29. — John Ross, Dunedin. Jan. 30. — John M'Neil, Mayor of Bal« clutha. Mar. 10. — W. Akersten, prominent Nelson citizen. Mar. 12.— H. W. Robinson, District Court Judge, Wairarapa. Mar. 15.— George Fisher, M.H.R. Mar. 22. — Sir A. J. Cadman, Speaker of Legislative Council. Apl. 12. — Richard Dewe, Crimean veteran. Apl. 25. — James B. Tarr, old Karori resident. May I.— E. G. <H. Luxford, Wellington. May 5. — J. Whiteman, Wellington. May 15. — Henry Barber, Wellington. May 22. — James Carroll, old Palmerston resident. June 15. — J. J. Jones, old Petone colonist. July 11.— Purikana Tanga, Ngatitoa chief. July 16. — W. Stanton, early Nelson settler. Aug. 4. — Alex. S. Dreyer, old resident of Carterton. Aug. 4.— Hon. Hone Kerei Taiaroa, M.L.C. Aug. 10.— G. J. Wiltshire, long associated with Wellington City Corporation. Aug. 14.— C. Winter, Inspector Bank of Australasia. Sept. 4. — Dean Hovell, Napier. Sept. 17. — J. W. Hoare, merchant, Wellington. Sept. 18.— Capt. Robb, of Beacon Hill, Signal Station, Wellington. Sept. 25.— Rev. Alex. Dasent, Wellington; Oct. 20.— Hon. J. T. Peacock, M.L.C. Oct. 27.— Capt. F. W. Hutton, F.R.S. (at the Cape of Good Hope). Oct. 29. — Alfred Saunders, ex-Superin-tendent of Nelson, and ex-M.H.R. Nov. 2. — Thomas Johnson, old Wellington resident. Nov. 25.— J. Tasker, Chief Clerk of j Police Commissioner's office. Dec. 6. — Job Vile, ex-member for Manawatu. Dec. 12— Hon. Capt. Kennv, M.L.C. Dec. 21.— Hart Udy, old Pefcone settier.

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1905. DIARY OF EVENTS. WELLINGTON., Evening Post, Volume LXX, Issue 155, 30 December 1905

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6,296

1905. DIARY OF EVENTS. WELLINGTON. Evening Post, Volume LXX, Issue 155, 30 December 1905

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