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SPORT AND PASTIME. The Turf.

RACING FIXTURES. December 9 and 10 — Woodvillo District J.C. Meeting. December 12 and 16 — Christchurch Summer Meeting. Decomber i! 6 and 28 — Dunedin Summer Meeting. December 26 and 28 — Taranaki Christmas Mooting. December 26 and 28 — Xlanawatu Summer Meoting. December 26 and 28— Thames Summer Meeting. December 26 and 28— Lower Valley Annual Meeting. ■» December 26, 29, January 1 and 2S — Auckland Summer Meeting. [Br Loohiel.] Entries for tho Cup and Handicap events at the Wellington Summer Meeting aro duo on Monday. Mr. D. Ross, of Wellington, has purchased Motor, by Hotcbkiss— Mantilla. Tho New Zealand horso Waimato was Bold in Melbourne recently, and is to bo raced in Western Australia. Tho N«w Zealand steeplechaser Moiina iras handicapped at 12.5 in a, two-milo event at Sundown Park Inst month. It is expected that Sir George Clifford w^ll have six horses running at tho Auckland Meeting— namely, Treadmill, Quarryman, Golden Vein, Bravo Heart, Windwhistle, and Stronghold. All of tho horses aro reported to havo dono good steady work at Riccarton, tho last-named being almost frco of a cold which had boon troubling him. Connie Chlol, who is said to bo looking well, will probably tako part in tho Monawfttu Summer Mooting. Dr. Bill had tho misfortune to fall in the Hardies at tho first day of tho Marlborough Meotiug, when he looked to havo tho raco well in hand. Tho eon of Gipsy King — Day Dawn mado no mistake tho following day, wjien ho won comfortably. It is uaid that Achilles will nob beBeen out again until the Wellington Cup Meeting in January. No loss than 125 individual horses competed at tho Fcikling Meoting this week. An increaso of £3860 over hist year's totAlisator figures i» recorded. Tho English-bred colt Groatorox, by Carbine, who showed great promise as a j two-ycar-okl, but failed to train on, has Arrived at Capetown. Other recent arrivals in. South Africa, aro Altair and King Log, both bred in. Now Zealand, where they carried Mr. G. G. Stead's colours. W. Lane, who had held tho leading position in the list of winning jockeys in England for tho scaaon, lost it to O. Madden on 19th. October, when Maddens total winning mounta reached 126, while Lane had ridden 125 winners. Next day Lano secured tho lead again,' but on tho day tho mail left tho totals wero Madden 229, Lane 128. Ab tho Victorian Racing Club's Meeting, several bookmaker* hod £1 notes passed on them for £10 notes. The forgery is said to h»v© been very clever, and could not bo detected unless the note was closoly (scanned. The word "ono" was rubbed out and "ton" put in its place. Hinctaura'a win in tho St. Andrew's Handicap at Feilding thu week come as a surpriso to many, people Tnulewind was mosb in demand with tho betting public, and, judging from the reports of the race, tho Sou'-weafcor gelding, 1 gotting away well, evidently essayed to win from start to finish. After some distance had been covered Hinetaura- ran through the field, and turning into the straight, was Zides with Tradowind, who was under whip. After the semblanco of a struggle, the Robinson more camo away and won easily by two lengths. Waiwera annexed tho Hurdles with ridiculous ease, beating tho favorite (Evening) by several lengths. Mr. R. O. Hungerford, Secretary of the New Sooth Wales Trotting Club, has (says a Sydney paper of 28tn November) received a reply from Mr. D. J. Price, of Christcharch, New Zealand, owner of the champion pacer Ribbonwood, stating that be is proposed to make a match against either Almont or I"ritz, or a three-corner-ed match between Ribbonwood, Alnmut, and Frit*, for a sweopstoke, the contest to bo decided in Sydney under the. auspices of the New Sooth Wales Trotting Ctab. la the event of a match boing arranged, Mr. Price suggests that it ehoakl take place about next April. Mr. Etangetfcrd has written the owners of A4mc*t and Frite to thus effect. Should no watch eventuate, Mr. Price is willing, on certain terms, to give two exhibitions over a miio aad two miles respectively .with Ribbonwood in Sydney. He experiment of speying fillies with the object of proving whether their racing capabilities would be improved thereby, has been tried in America by Messrs. Clay and Woodfowi, the Runnymede stndmaflters, and tho result has been successful. It is claimed that tho unsexed fillies race more consistently than their entire sisters, and eorao are of opinion that the operation brings them on an equality with colts. Several other breeders have been so impressed by tho innovation that they are Having their fillies, operated upon, but, however good it may be from a racing point of view, the ultimate requite must be detrimental to the interest of horse-breeding. Pretty Polly, who won the Middle Pork Plate, of 2475 sots., for two-year* j olds, at Newmarket last month, had when the mtiH left London sever been beaten, having won seveu races of tho value of 12,169 soys. Sh« is a chestnut filly, tho property of Major E. Lodor, by Gallinule from itdntfration, and in the race under notice she started at 2 to 1 on in a fiold of seven, and won all tho way by three lengths, St. Amont and Hands Down filling the minor places. Hands Down ran in the namo of the American sportsman, Mr. W. O. Whitney, and shortly after this race it will be remembered the announcement, was made by cablegram that Mr. Whitney was severing his connection with the turf as an owner. Pretty Polly *ras unfortunately not entered for tho Derby, but sho is engaged in tho other classic races. Up to the present, betting has not been very lively on the Auckland Cup. Treadmill is so far tho best fancied. An offer was mode in tho northern city this week to accept 100 to 18 about Sir Q. Clifford's coit, but 100 to 20 was tho best quotation • 6 to 1 agst Treadmill, 8 to 1 Wairiki and Idas, 10 to 1 General Symons, 10 to 1 Golden Rose, 12 to 1 Strathavon, 12 to 1 Nonetto, 14 to 1 Borneo and Melodcon, 16 to 1 Halberdier and Kolburn, 20 to 1 Beddington, Quarryman, and The Needle, 25 to 1 Lady Lillian, Pallas, Menura, Royal Plumes, Float and Putty, 33 to 1 Hinetaura, Ropa, Battleaxe, Mars, and Onewa, 50 to 1 Gladsome, Idea, Ghoorka, Mnskerdale, Waiwwa, and Dolores, 60 to 1 Ringman, Count of Kolmar, and Lolah, 100 to 1 Okoari, Lavalette, Hipstone, Provost Marshall, Royal Fusilier, Miss Lottie, Bnluwayo, Matamau, and Matamfttaharakeke, 2QO to 1 Rose Shield, Torchon, Jewellery, Position, Military, Bastion, Stepdancer, and Paul Seaton. The St. Andrew's Handicap, run at Takapuna. on Saturday last, proved a fairly "soft thing" for Maro, the chestnut son of Lehel — Duma. Dolores headed the netting list, then came Maro and Soultfish. The two latter wero quickest to show prominently in the race, with Jiwk Brown, lying well up, next. Tbo Justnamed took charge as they raced to the turn, but once fairly in the straight he gave placo to Soultfish, who went bow lin v down past the stand a leurth in

front of Jack Brown, with Dolores, The Doctor, Militaty, Bonheur, and Mataniatuharakeko following in that order. Dolores moved up going out of tho bottom turn, ami sho was racing on terms with Soultfish as they mado their way acrons tho back to tho top stretch. A few strides further on Dolores wna acting tho part of tho pacemaker, and she stayed thero until they landod into tho straight, whero Mnro came along with a hlroug and well-sustained run, winning easily by a couple of longths, Soultfish about the samo distance behind Dolores, in third place. Military was fourth, Bonheur fifth, Matamataharakeke sixth, Tho Doctor seventh, and Jack Brown last. Rose Shield, tho three-year-old eister to Royal Artillery, met with some bad injuries whilo on tho voyage up to Auckland lust week, by tho s.s. Westralia. According to a report in a local paper, it appears that tho filly, along with Kamo, Wairiki, Mars, and Stratha-von, wero making tho trip North on deck, and the steamer running into bad weather sGo broke her headgear and tho bar which kept her in beiiiK displaced, Rose Shield crossed tho hatchway and was steering a courso down tho alleyway • when sho fell. Ono of tho ship's company wan awakened by Roso Shield falling, and seeing the plight in which the filly was in raised an alarm. After some trouble and not a little anxiety, Roso Shield was oxtricated from her serious position, and it was then found she was very badly cut and knocked about. Rose Shield can safely be counted out of all immediate engagements, and horn what I enn learn (adds the Northern writer) she may novor race again. It is a really hard piece of luck for Mr. Hugo Friedlander to loso tho #>erviccs of Roso Shield as a racer, for there were strong grounds for entertaining thu opinion that the best had not been seen of her by a very long way. However, oven should Roso Shield nevor race again, sho should be most valuablo for breeding purposes, as ebo is very beautifully bred. Matuku's performance in the York Stakes at tho second day of the Foilding Meeting came as a surprise. Tho filly started in the Flying Stakes (six furlongs) tho previous day with 7.2 on her back, but was unplaced. On the following day sho had to carry 6.13 over tho same distance, and romped homo an easy wiunor. A protest on the ground of inconsistent running was entered, but was dismissed. Tho daughter of Gold Reef — Kotuku rowarded her backors with £14 17s. Two other big dividends woro paid tho samo day— namely, tho Cheltenham Hurdles, won by Levant (£l6 19s), and Welter Hack, won by Waipawa (£2l). In tho former race the public plumped for Midia, with Waiwera next on tho list. Aroha and Lady 801 l made tho running at the start, but rounding tho bend into tho straight tho second timo, Levant drew away fiom the Joeld, and ran homo with half a length to spare from Defiance, who camo very fast at the finish. A protest entered against tho winner on tho ground of crossing was dismissed. The finish in the Welter Hack was ono of the most oxcitiug during tho day. It was fought out between Waipawa, Roseshoot, and Seraphine, resulting in tho first named winning by a head; Rososhoot, tho fjivouritOj being second. Tho winnings of tho progony of English stallions' up to 12th October show 'littlo alteration to tho previous reckoning. St. Frusquin (22), by St. Simon, beads the list with .16 winners of 31 races worth £25,102. As tho season was nearly at on end when the mail left, thoro is not much prospect of his being ousted from hi 3 proud position. Persimmon (7), by St. Simon, itf second on tho list with la winners of 19 rocos worth £21,219, or less than £100 ahead of Gallinulc, whoso all-victorious daughter, Pretty Polly, has since added the Middle Park Plato to her account, and probably Gallinule will finish second on this Benson's list. Gallinulo (19), who is by Isonomy (19), had 17 winners of 31 races to lm credit. Tho position of other stallions whooe progeny won over £4000 are as under: — Sainfoin (2), by Springfield, £19,415, chiefly won by Rock Sand ; St. Florian (20), by St. Simon, £17,723, nearly all of which Ard Patrick contributed; Ayrshire (8), by Hampton, £9712; Juggler (9), by Touchit, £9310 ; Ladas (1), by Hampton, £9258; Melton (8), by Master Kildare, £8002 ; Rightaway (11), by Wisdom, £7943 ; Love Wisely (11), by Wisdom, £7396 ; Wolf's Crag (15), by Barcaldino, £6875; Matchmaker (22), by Donovan, £6813 ; Kilwarliu (9), by Arbitrator, £6798; Amphion (36), by Rosebery, £5693; Bay Ronald, by Hampton, £6254; St. Simon (11), by Galopin, £5093; Carbine (2), by Musket, £4969 ; St. Angelo (16), by Galopin, £4919; Martagon (16), by Bend Or, £4962; St. Serf (8), by St. Simon, £4653; Royal Hampton (11), by Ilamptoii £4573. The difference of opinion among the Stewards of the Auckland Club regarding tho Rosella case, and which lod to the resignation of Dr. Reid, is causing a good deal of talk in sporting circles. Dr. Reid had sent a reply to the statement of tho "threo Judiciary Stewards." Ho says : — "I rogret that I was not emphatic onough in my remarks to these gentlemen on Monday, 9th November, but I followed tho courso usually adopted at Ellorslio. After tho evidence I gavo at Thursday's enquiry, which I considered very emphatic, theso gentlemen helped to bring in a verdict that thero is no ovidenco, etc., etc' This seams to mo to point to the fact that no emphasis on my part could satisfy theso gentlemen, also that tho evidence of a specially selected steward, selected for a particular purpose, is not worth anything. I consider that Judicial Stewards, from their knowledge of racing, aro appointed to protect tho public, and that tho committee considers their opinion of value. If this bo so, no peculiar emphasis on the part of one of their number should be required to stimulate the others to action. I may add that one of these thro© gentlemen, beforo and after Saturday last, hn» stated that I was -very anxious for an enquiry on 9th November, and approached him with that object, which ho was willing to support. I had no desire to attend a meeting on Wednesday, ljth November, after the committee had expressed the opinion that nothing could bo dono. In conclusion, I should Tike to point out to these gentlemen, who aro such sticklers for 'a proper course,' that they called no mooting themselves ; also, that the enquiry held by the stewards on Thursday was not in accordance with tho Rules of Racing (vide rule lla), a special Judicial tiottimittco having been appointed to deal with 7 all such matters. The majority of tho .stewards present at Thursday's enquiry woro not at the races on both 9th November and 11th November, and therefore lost tho valuablo evidence of their own eyes." Considerable interest has been created at Dunedin in the trial of Peter Grant, Abraham Moss, and Benjamin Curtis on a chardo of keeping a gaming-house. The accused were acquitted. In addressing the jury Mr. Justico Williams commented in strong terms as regards the employment of informers. The .jury must, ho said, bo satisfied not only that tho hot was made, in the office, because a person was entitled to make a bet without breaking the law, but they must bo able to infer from the evidence and the circumstances not merely that an isolated bet was mado, but that tho office was uced for the purposes stated. The prosecution in tho present case depended on ! the evidence of tho witnesses Barclay i and Macmillan. As had been said by [ tho eounsol for tho defence, and practically admitted, their evidence wanted very careful investigation. It would be very proper to require corroboration of such evidence. Every responsible person.

however, must admit that it is even necessary and proper for the police to employ spies and informers in order lo discover hieaehes of tho law. They (tho jury) might havo their own opinion of tho character of tho spies and informers, and, having that opinion, think it proper to watch their evidence with tho greatest cnro. But it must bo Admitted on nil hands that it was sometime** an unfortunato necessity that thoir services bhould be required. It whs admitted that the Mitnchses in the present case wero employed by tho police to catch theso bookmakers, and supplied them with money for the purpose. It seemed to his Ilonour, looking at the conduct of theso witnesses, that they rendered themselves liable to a prosecution for an offence, bocause it was in ml o an offonco by tho Acj of 1894 for any person not only to givo totalisator odds, but to tako them. Howover, the jury was to look at thoir cvi- | denco, and then at tho documents M'hich j wero soized in the office of tho accused, and see if tho documents corroborated their testimony.

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Bibliographic details

SPORT AND PASTIME. The Turf., Evening Post, Volume LXVI, Issue 136, 5 December 1903

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SPORT AND PASTIME. The Turf. Evening Post, Volume LXVI, Issue 136, 5 December 1903

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