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Health Better than Wealth.

THSI^ AS A SKELETON. 6 Results ©f a Siyggish Liver

The Case of Wiv. J. WALLACE. (by a special reporter.) Wealth does not always bring happiness, from all parts of the world mauy instances lave been brought to light bearing on the kbove theory. " Better the honest rasher •I toil than the gil ied homily of luxury," is t motto, it has been said, very much open ■o cxiticism, but to judge by the number of 'ich men who are unhappy from various sauses there appears to bo considerable iruth in the quotation. Take, for example, ihe majority of men who follow the plough rom sunrise till sundown. They are cheerHil and contented in the enjoyment of their Dhysical strength, without which all the wealth and luxury in existence would be lseless to them. Mr. John Wallace, of Express Avenue, Wellington, told our resorter he had done a great amount of hard irork in his yourg days, and that he was lever in better spirits than when capable of performing laborious work. " I did not know what a care or a trouble was 60 long as I had my health," pursued Mr. Wallace, "but when my constitution jroke down I was awfully miserable." " How were you originally affected ? " " For a. long time I felt seedy and unwell, is if the vitality was slowly leaking from ny system I got up from bed feeling just v tiied as I was when I turned in the previous night, and half the day was over Defore 1 felt properly awake. Indeed, I was aever otherwise than i ull and drowsy, with i disinclination to stir myself more than was iltogether necessary. Many a little thing I law wanted doing about the house or garden, 3ut I had not the requisite energy to fix it jp and lave further damage. Severe headichea were my daily torment. The healthy tppetite I used to have now left me. I oould lot eat as much in a week as I used to take n one meal, the consequence being that I Decame as thin as a skeleton. My face ooked drawn and pinched, with my cheeks iimk right in, and my eyes were deep in .heir sockets. The light food that was jrep&red for me proved too much for my weak and feeble system to digest. The food lecaye t d in my stomach instead of digesting, ■vith the result that sour gases -rumbled ibout my inwde, causing intense paroxysms )f agony, which left me in a state of helpess prostration. The lower part of my itomach was excessively tender, even the Dressure of my clothes causing a very pain'ul sensation. Under my shoulders and in me loins my complaint showed very trouble:ome symptoms, resembling the pricking of leedles and pins. One of my greatest ailneute was the irregular condition of my Dowels. Eor days I suffered from costiveless, with scanty and cloudy urine ; afterwards I was greatly weakened by severe ittacks of diarrhtea. Try what means I vould, I could never get over this difficulty, ■vhich was a new and unpleasant experience •or me. The generation of wind 'also caused ny body to distend, and my heart palpitated to violently that I often thought my time lad come." ' ' That is one of the symptoms of a diseased iver." " Yes, so I believe ; but I thought at the ,ime I had heart disease. I really believed [ would go right off when those attacks vere on, and one of my doctors told me my leart was very weak. I often had an idea .hat a cancer, or something of the sort, was ■ rowing in my inside, in consequence of feeing something solid aud painful iv my tide. Nearly every morning I was sick. [ believe it was the vile taste in my mouth >n arising from bed which made me so; but, it all events, I remember quite clearly how t used to retch and vomit for a long time ifter getting up. My breath was very bad, x>o, nd my tongue was covered with a lirfcy, foul coating." " How did you sleep at night ? " " Don't ask me. So many nights passed without sleep that I thought I was a victim ,o insomnia for life, and you kuow a man lannot live long and keep his senses without ileep To lay awake night after night, vith the body aohing and full of torture, is

tho greatest affliction af all, and I have hai my share of it. I used to • long for fchi morning to come to relieve my mind frorr the horrible ruminations which, beset 1 mj brain during the long and tedious hours o: night ; but when the daylight did appear ir my room I was n» better," for my inability to get up and busy myßelf made my helpleei condition all the more apparent. Anothei thing I must not forget to mention is thi3 As I lay ti ssing and turning in my extreme agony, I used to sweat profusely, and sensations of excessive heat were alternated 03 cold chill." " Do you think you contracted a severe cold?" "I am not quite certain ; but I had indications that my kidneys were in 4 verj bad state. The pains in my back were beyond all human endurance, and they cam* on so suddenly at times tliat they made m< groan aloud. I had a continual thirst, and although 1 drank large quantities of barlej ■water and bo forth, I could not appease th< craving I had for more. My nerves wen quito knocked out of time by my disea.ee. ] could not hold my hand still for ten secondi if you had given me a thousand pounds foi doing so. The slightest sound made m< nervous and irritable. In fact, I was nevei in a good humour. Whatever was done ti please me failed. I was despondent and melancholy to a degree that I did not think attainable. A recovery in my caso seemec ' impossible, and I really thought my diseasi would prove fatal." " How long did you have a doctor attend ing you ? " ** I was under first one doctor, thet another, for close on twelve years, and 1 thought it was a fair thing to leave o£ hoping against hope after so much uselesi medical treatment. I gave up the docton in despair, and started trying tocuiemysel' with medicines I saw advertised. Eacl patent physic was given a good trial, but 1 may just as well have thrown my money ir the river for all the benefit I derived. In sure I tried every patent medicine in till country, but they were no earthly good t< me. Yet I am now seventy yearg of age and I am as well and hearty as ever I wai in my life." " What an extraordinary change mus' have come o\ er you. How did it happen ? ' " Through the agency of a friend whotolc me Clemsnts Tonic would make a new max of me. I bought some Clements Tonic anc persevered foi a while without any apparen' alteration, but in less than a week I felt s little better This encouraged me to keeg going with Clements Tonic, and soon tin agonising pains in my stomach and bad died away. From that I improved daily my appetite returning, and my head wai free from aches. Vomiting and all in digestion symptoms were cured by dementi Tonic ; my kidney troubles aleo disappear ing. I slept soundly, and felt vigorous anc light-hearted on awaking. I was madt heavy and strong by Clements Tonic, whict saved my life. 1 have never been ill sinc< Clements Tonic cured me many years ago." " Your statements will appear in print with your permission ? "*' " You may publish my testimony in &nj way you please." STATUTORY DECLARATION. I, John Wallace, of Express Avenue, Wellington in the Colony of New Zealand, do solemnly am sincerely declare that I have carefully read ttv annexed document, consivting of three folios am consecutively numbered fiomoneto three, and tba it contains and is a true and faithful ocooun of my illness and cute by Oenynts Tonic, and als> contains my lull pel mission to puoliah in any way ny statements— which Igive voluntarily, without receiv ing any payment ; anil I make this solemn declaratioi conscientiously believing the same to be true, and b; virtue of ihe provisions of an Act of the Geners Assemble of New Zealand, intituled " The Justices 0 Peace Act, 1882. Declared at Wellington this 17th day ol Novembd ono thousand nine hundred, before me, ROBERT McKENZIE, J.l\

Poneke close. The Oriental-Poneke game in the first round was as close as it well could be. A noticeable feature about th<s last three or four senior championship games !has been the immense improvement eihown on the form in the first round. Even the little coterie which eternally holds up the forward play of -ten years ago as the real game of football must feel a certain satisfaction at the last couple of matches. There is, however, plenty of room for more science. W. Hardcastle, the . erstwhile Melrose clubman, Wellington rep., and New Zealand rep., has made his reappearance in Australian football. The following' extract from a report on the Glebe-Univer-sity game gives a fair idea of the tactics adopted by the ex-Wellingtonian : — "Glebe toed through the ruck, and Hardcastle, who was offside four or five yards, dribbled it very cleverly through the three-quarters, on the extreme left wing. Keeping the ball at toe, he beat Verge inside fhe 25, and it was then toed across the line. . . It was a beautiful bit of <play, but a great pity it was palpably blurred by the off-side. . . The referee penalised Hardcastle several times, but did not catch him quite as often as he transgressed. THE AUSTRALIAN TOUR. The New Zealand representative team •which is to leave for Australia to-night will be well treated at the hands of the N.S.W. officials. The following list of entertainments has been mapped out : — Wednesday, 15th July : Arrive in Syd- 1 -ney, informal reception by Council and ! officials. Thursday, 16th July : Reception by the Lord Mayor, Town Hall, at noon ; evening 1 , footballers' smoke-concert, Aaron's Exchange Hotel, 8 p.m. Friday, 17th July : Afternoon, drive to South head. Saturday, 18th July : New Zea- i land v. New South Wales ; evening, theatre. Sunday, 19th July : Harbour excursion. Monday, 20th July : Leave for ' Bathurst 10.15 a.m. train; arrive Bathursfc 4.30 p.m; reception by Mayor; banquet and smoke-concert. Tuesday, 21st July : Morning, Hare Drive, Bush dinner ; afternoon, Marsupial hunt. Wednesday, 22nd July : New Zealand v. Western Branch, at Bathurst. Thursday, 23rd *July: Leave Bathurst 10.30 a.m.; lunch Mount Victoria;, arrive Katoomba 2.15 p.m., and drive to Leura Falls. Friday, 24th July : Arrive in Sydney. Saturday, 25th July : New Zealand v. New South Wales. Sunday, 26th July : Visit Prospect Reservoir; drag leaves 1.10 p.m. •sharp. Monday, 27th July': Visit to National Park; drag leaves at 10 a.m. Tuesday, 28th July : At leisure. Wednesday, 28th July : New Zealand v. Metropolitan team; all aboard for Brisbaiie, 5.10 p.m. Wednesday, 12th Aug- 1 ust: New Zealand v. Northern Districts, at Maitland ; evening, entertainment. Thursday, 13th August : Arrive Sydney ; evening, Newtown F.C. smoke-concert.. Friday, 14th August : At leisure. Saturday, 15th August : New Zealand v. Australia ; evening, banquet tendered by Australasian Rugby Football Council. Sun- - day, 16th August : Afternoon drive. Monday, 17th August : Excursion to Hawkesbury River, train leaves at 9.15 a.m. Tuesday, 18fch August: Evening, theatre. Wednesday, 19th August : New Zealand v. Combined Country ij evening, homeward bound. Farewell. The tour of the team will be a hard one for the men engaged, and I will not be in the least surprised if a relay has to be sent over before it concludes. A letter received by a Wellington resident from an official of the Queensland Rugby Union states that the union has started what is termed its "country week." This is a big undertaking. The Northern v team consi&ts of players from the branch unions of Cairns, Charters Towers, Ravenswood, and Townsville, ■which places average nearly 1000 miles from Brisbane. The correspondent says the Central team, Mount Morgan and Rockhampton, travel over 500 miles to get here, and the Southern team, Bundaberg, Maryborough, Gympie, and Western team, Ipswich, ToowoombaJ and Warwick hav> to come distances varying from Ipswich, 26 miles, to Bundaberg, 250 miles. This gives an idea of the stretch the name covers, It is 9. bite un-.

dertaking for the union, but there is every hope of being able to clear expenses. The profit or reward will doubtless show itself in after years. The letter also states that Spragg is at present hors de combat with a badly strained knee. There is just a possible chance that he may be able to play against tiie New Zealanders. Mr. Baifstow has been appointed to manage the Wairarapa team during its Southern tour. The poorness of play in the WellingtonManawatu junior match makes it impossible to. say anything in the way of individual criticism. No one stood out on the Wellington side. For Manawatu, Campbell, George, and Stubbs were most prominent. They are all players with possibilities. Manawatu did well to make a draw with the city team. Of the latter the least said the better. If Saturday's play is the true measure of our juniors (writer would prefer to believe that it is not), where are the footballers of the future to come from? Auckland, if it cannot get good enough material from the junior ranks in the city, goes to the affiliated country unions for it. How long will it be . before apermanent alliance is made between Wellington, on the one hand, and on the other, Wairarapa, Manawatu, Horowhenua, and perhaps other country unions, for the greatei good of Rugby and the honour of the province?

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Bibliographic details

Health Better than Wealth., Evening Post, Volume LXVI, Issue 10, 11 July 1903

Word Count
2,305

Health Better than Wealth. Evening Post, Volume LXVI, Issue 10, 11 July 1903

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