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SPORT AMD PASTIME.

The Turf. [By Cbackshot.] „ RACING~iTxTURES. 1902-3. • , ♦ December 26 and ,27 — Lower Valley J.C Annual. , . December 26 and 27— Dunedin J.C. Summer. ; Uecember 26 and 27— -Manawatu R.C Summer. December 26 and 27— Taranaki J.C. Christmas. December 26, 29, and January 1 and 2 .— Auckland R.C. Summer. December 29— Ashhurst-Pohangina R.C. Annual. January ' X and 2 — Rangitikei R.C. Summer. January 1 and 2— Hawkes--Bay tI.C. Summer. January 1 and 2— Waijarapa R.C. Summer. Owners should bear in mind that nominations for the Taranaki Jackey Club's Summer Meeting close on 7th January. The Wairarapa Racing Club is likely to have a special meeting at New Year time, and as the Tauherenikau fixture is a vevff popular one, with the Wellington public especially, a big muster from town will doubtless leave here on New Year morning. .Mr. Henrys declared his weights this . week ■ for the first day's events, and " considering the ' large fields and the variety of , classes of horses he was called on to bring together, the handicapper has _done his work well. The racing; at Christmas time will alter the handicaps somewhat, for winners at the various meetings thjLt also have engagements at Tauherenikau will be called on to- carry penalties— those handicapped under Bst 101b an extra 101b and an additional 61b for every flat race ; those handicapped at _Bst 101b and over, half the above penalties. The Wairarapa Cup is the principal event at the meeting, being a mile and a-half race, endowed * with 250 soys. Convoy, of course, heads the handicap against a, poor lot, being allotted 9st 31b — 121b' more than was awarded, him in the Manawatu Cup, where the presence of Halberdier in the list kept the weight off the others. 'Hinetaura (Bst 101b) has a stone more than she is called on to carry at'Palmerston, Convoy thus getting 2ib the best of it through being raised from Bst 51b to 9st 1 31b. Hinetaura 'has for some reason gained a huge number of friends since ehe was beaten at Woodville, but still I would sooner have' Convoy at the weights. No chances have been thrown at Ghoorka in being asked to carry Bst 91b. Mr. Henrys must have a good opinion of the Lochiel colt to place him so near the top weights. His best performance so far was at the Hutt recently, ' when he won the Hutt Park Spring Handicap, seven furlongs, with 7st 71b, Windwhhtfe being second with 7st- 51b, and St. Denis next with Bst 131b. When over a mile and a quarter on the -first day with 6st 71b in the saddle he was beaten out of a place. The handicapper may be right in hi/3 opinion that Ghoorka is a good one, but at the same fime the colt has been badly treated on performances. He also may win if reserved for the event, for the vbest may have earned penalties ; but at the present time I would sooner stand Convoy to beat him. Little Volley at 7st 71b, if fit and well, would have a really good chance, but she may not be forward enough, and, besides, she has been going a long time now. The Porirua. stable supplies the three top weights in the Flyuig Handicap — Ostiak 9st 131b, and Exmooriand Ghoorka at Bst 91b. 'I like Exmoor best of the trio, and lie should run a clipping six furlongs on the even Tauherenikau course. Exmoor and Ghoorka have been handicapped just * >under Bst 101b, so in the event of them winning a rage at Palmerston they incur a 101b penalty. Shrapnel Shell is well «nough in at Bst, and he will not have any further penalty to carry, whereas some of the others doubtless will. Others that possess chances are Torowai (7at 131b) and Platypus (7sfc 81b). I care

most for Rebel (lOst 91b), Whario (9st 71b), and Gipsy Jack (9ot) in the Grandstand Welter. In the Plying Hack Handicap Mr. Henrys has not dropped Gold iSeal a pound for his two Woodville defeats, and if he is anything like he was at Otaki, when he "walked in" in a fivefurlong flutter and then afterwards «rnn second to Kamo in the Napier Park Stakes, Bst 131b should not stop him at Tauherenikau. I suppose the best of the Porirua stable's representatives— Clovelly (Bst 61b), Rawiri (Bst 51b), and Elibank (8st)~will have' lo be considered, and^ rumour says it may. be Rawiri, Waiuku's big brother. But looks are against him being a sprinter. Clovelly, does noc appear in the acceptance? for either Manawatu or Ashhur&t.' Two on the 7st. 131b mark —Opaeae and Ringmanc— can gallop a merry six furlongs, and the former is a {very smart beginner. Tutungarehu (7st 81b) and Hamua (Bst sib) appear the pick of the Eimutaka Handicap lot, and Kaema (9st 51b), Ziska (lOst 31b), and Elibank (9st 81b) may be the be§t of the Hack Welder candidates. Tikarawa, weighted at the minimum, is I a, stablemate of Cure, and showed fine Fomj?e previous to going amiss after iofu ki Meetin£?- Turanganui (lOst 121b) and Boko (lOst 71b) seem the best in the Hack Hurdles. Acceptances are clue to-mghb. ' Mr. Henrys was rewarded with a splendid- acceptance for the Manawatu Meeting, and ■by his capable, adjustments has practically saved the meeting from being a £ame aSair. Indications certamly pointed that way when the nominations came out, but things, .do not ap^ pear so "blue!' now. The likelihood of Halberdier, Dexterity, Convoy, Motor, and Hinetaura measuring strides .in the Cup is in itself worth a visit to Palmerston. The' connections behind the ■qfcmtet are each likely to fancy their respective candidates on tlie day, and I understxind Halberdier's party make no secret of their confidence in the ability bi the Cuirassier gelding to repeat Tortulla's last year's performance and place on record both cups—New Zealand and Manawatu. Too much notice, therefore,

should not be taken of his Hutt and .Feilding running. Dexterity is a genuine;stayer, and the distance will probably suit her better than any "other com , petitor with perhaps the exception of the top-weight. Convoy is without a doubt' a good one, and as he will have the services of T. Wilson, and will therefore be ridden a patient race, I incline a deal to his chance. Motor is a genuine cus- . tomer, and one that can be lelied on !to run an honest race. His running, \ however} Mould lead one to^believe that ' his favourite course is a mile'and a quarter. Still, I think that in an evenrun race, he should be handy at the finish. Hinetaura comes as a very strong tip, and those Wellingtonians who backed! her for tho Woodville Handicap swear vengeance on her, and declare they will get even over the Manawatu Cup. Her Hastings King Edward Handicap victory was full of merit, and if she can stay her chance may be as good at Manawatu as people make out. She bolted into third place at Woodville, and now has ■ 91b less to carry Rahmrai and Rose- ' plot make u|> the field, but I don't look ■ bopefully on their chances in an ordinarily run race. Alf Shersby looks to hold a strong hand for the Manawatu Meeting with West guard, Queen's Guard, and Oingo, and jf i -were a backer 1 would like to place my money alongside the stable's. Of course, one would have lo be prepared to take a small price, for when Shearsby's liorses are fancied a lot of money is forth » coming for them; and the machine tells the tale. ' The public are very loyal to Prosser's stable, and the latter will provide its followers wilh nlenty of speculation during the holidays. At Palmcrston the stable has "accepted with Ostiak, Exmoor, Elibank, and Hamua on the first day,- and will doubtless be well represented on the second day of the meeting Then at Ashhurst it hasl Rawiri Hrmua Elibank, Position, and Sir Galakod engaged, and a strong team will probably 'go to Tauherenikau, wliile Porirua fs likely to go to Auckland. It would be interesting to know the total sum invent-

Ed by the public on the machine and with the layers on the stable's representatives during the holidays. The winners of the two-year-old races at the Christchurch Racing Club's meeting — Leouore and Uoscoinmon respectively — wero well sorted out, and there was such a lot of money coming for them with the local pencillers that the latter closed down and would only accommodate clients for a small amount. The layers as a rule fight shy of the small meetings around Christchurch, as the things "sorted out" are generally very savoury, and when there was such a rush to get on to Leonore and Roscommon most of them profited by past experience, and consequently saved their money. Lady Lillian promises to worthily uphold the form of her dam Lady Zetland. At the Christchurch meeting she deadheated with Clytie, in the principal race on the first day, but at the same time ought to have won, the boy on her back being to blame. In a five-furlong race on Tuesday she jumped off in front with 9st 131b, and won very comfortably. Her form points to her being capable of something better than she has been doing of late, and it is quite on the cards that she will be seen taking a prominent hand in the decision of the Wellington Cup, for which she is likely to be kept in reserve. I hear very favourable accounts of the track doings of the champion Advance, at Porirua, and this will be welcome news to all lovers of a good horse. The black horse still retains his brilliancy, but, of course, it remains to be seen whether his wind afiection will seriously affect his staying powers. As a rule it does, but' Advance's pace may carry him through. He has been bowling along in great style of late ; and his sprinting work has been of a high order. This may influence his lessees to again nominate him for ' the Newmarket Handicap. An injunction has been lodged by Mr. H. Franks, the owner of The Swimmer, against the stakes attaching to tiie Second Hurdle Race at the Takapunli Meeting being paid to the nominator of Perseverance. The question of ownership of the Strenuous gelding is the ground on which the injunction has been laid. Koss Heaton, who trained Perseverance for the North Shore engagements, has also made a claim on the staJsS for services. • Auckland stables do not claim a single representative in the Wellington Cup nominations. From "Javelin's"' Pepper and Salt column in the Melbourne Leader : "We hear a lot about racing in Victoria haying deteriorated," said a representative* of the modern school to a veteran turfite. "Now, candidly speaking, in what do you see the great deterioration— in the horses or the riders?" "In the owners," replied the veteran sententiously. Porirua was sore previoiis to being galloped at Porirua on Wcdne : day, and was even more so at the conclusion of his exercise. Still it is no.t thought that the soreness is of a serious nature, and if Prosser considers it as not so he was to leave for Auckland this morning, where he will" compete in the Auckland Cup and Derby. H. Francis has again left Prosser's employ. Kereru has been performing well over the jumps at Porirua, but ho fnet with a slight xiccident the other morning, and therefore may not be taken to Tauherenikau. With the exception of a couple of thousands tnken respectively about Porirua and Wniriki and Siege' Gun and Wairiki in connection", with the Auckland Cup and Railway Handicap, and a thousai*! about Poriraa and Hiijdn for the Cup and ' Steeplechase, the watering transacted in Auckland on the big events impending at Ellcrslie has been mostly confired to small amounts. The following was tho state of the odds oh the Cnp last Saturday :—6: — 6 to 4 agst Sieee 'Gun, 4 to *1 Porirua, 5 to 1 Bluejacket, 10 to 1 Tne Shannon, lp to 1 Mars, 14 to 1 Idas, 16 to 1 Matamataharakeke, 20 to 1 Legion ot Honour. An. R. T. Turnbull and H. D. Nelson will be present at the Auckland Meeting. - Mr. Stead's cheque for the Auckland Meeting promises to- be a healthy one. Siepe Gun looks a " moral " for the Cup, of 1000 soys, and should win -other races at the meoiing. OrloUfe claim in the Derby of 750 roys appears a very healthy one, while I can"ot see anything to beat the unpemlised King Los in the Great Northern Foal Stakes, of 500 fovs. The Auckland Plate, of 400 fovs, will be won for certain by Cruciform, if she is nil right on the day, and King Leg mic-ht win tho Royal Stake*, of 500 soys. The Victorian penciller who monopolised the strai 2 ht out betting at the recent ■,} m f tin g- not bs'ng allowed to bet at Auckland meetings,, owing to betting bempc reserved for /nembers of Auckhnd Tatiorsall's, it is likely that he present at the Manawatu and' Tauherenikau meetings. The disappointing Dodona is now tho property of "M. Anderson," a local sportsman. She is still trained by H iletcher. Aided by recent legislation, the police seem lo have suppressed totalisaton shops m Adelaide. The Australasian's correspondent writes :— "As a result of an Act passed last session the tofcilisator shops in the city have been closed. As soon as the. Act was passed 'most of them shut their doors, but one remained open inviting a raid, so that a test case mitrht oe heard. It is understood that they have been legally advised that they could defeat the intentions of the Legislature on technical grounds. The police, however, did not raid the place, but they pdopted a more effective method of achieving the object of the legislators. Uetectjv«B were recently stationed outside Uie door of the shop, and, as any one betting there was liable to a fine of £20 uo one ventured to go inside under the oves of the police, and thus court arrest Consequently the shutters wero put un and the ahop closed." L Tho champion steeplechaser Manifesto waa sedh out again at the Liverpool Meeting in the Grand Lipton Steeplechase of 500 soys, carrying 12st 121b. The race was a chapter of accidents, and an outsider', in Kirkland, by the Australian-bred Kirkham, won easily from Manifesto. The Mflbourno Lnder sn3 r s that it is stated on good authority that the crack New Zealand colt, Achilles, will visit Australia for the Autumn campaign at Flemington and 1 Randwick An Australian who visited the Welbeck stud lately brought away a card giving particulars of horses, mares, foals, etc. Mowerina, the dam of Donovan, Raeburn, Semolina, etc., is now 26 years old, and was not put to the horse this year. The old mare was weighed recently, and found to weigh 9cwt. It is estimated that her descendants have won 16cwt in gold. • Donovan alone won £55,153. The Duke of Portland has five sires at' Welbeck, two at Newmarket, and one at Tamworth. Besides St. Simon and Carbine, there are the Derby winners Donovan and Ayrshire, while Raeburn once had the honour of beating Isinglass. St. Simon is said to be showing his age. He is 21, while Carbine is 17. It is evident, from the card, that Carbine was going out of favour at Welbeck when his stock started to do well last year. Of the 17 yearlings, only one is by flarbinc, and only one of the 22 foals is by him. However, this year he had six of the 31 mares. The Duke does not reserve his mares for his own stallions. Orme, Cylene, Gallinule, Isinglass, and Ladas- were all patronised thio jci'i. Wheel oi Fortune- and Mowerina arc the same age, and next to them come Taci and Satchel, who are each 20. There are three daughters of Mowerina in thestud.

Colonel Harry M'Calmont, whose death ■was cabled out recently, waa a member of the House of Commons, the owner of Isinglass, and one of the richest men in England. Mr. M'Calmont, as he was then, started racing under the guidance of Captain Machell about fifteen years ago, one of the first horses bought for him being Timothy, who won the Ascot Cup in 1888. It is related that at this meeting Mr. M'Calmont clearly indicated that he had no intention of betting. E. H. Fry asked him before the Gup if he wanted to, back Timothy, as he could lay him 4to 1. "Yes," said Mr. M'Calmont; "I will take £8 to £2." The bookmakers never bothered about his custom after that. Isinglass was the deceased sportsman's great horse. He won the Guineas, Derby, and St. Leger in 1893, and wound up an exceptionally brilliant career by taking the Ascot Gold Cup as a five-year-old. He ran for four seasons, and his only defeat was incurred., in the Lancashire Plate, in which Rae-' bjrn just beat him when receiving 101b, and La Fleche was third. Captain Machell always declared that Isinglass should • not have ran in this race. He had dove a severe St. Leger preparation, and was not in trim for sprinting. He won £57,455 in • stakes, the largest amount ever credited to one horse, and his dam, Deadlock, was once sold for £19 ! xU the stud Isinglass did not start too well, but he was third on the list of winning sires this season. Although this was not a lucky year for Colonel M'Calmont — he was second in the Derby, Oaks, and St. Leger— St. Maclou, Rising Glass, Glass Jug, and others won good races for him. From 1888 to the end of 1901 Colonel M'Oalmont's horses won £116,251 in stakes. A few mouths ago it was cabled that Colonel M'Calmont was likely to* be offered the post of GovernorGeneral of Australia. He fought in the South African war, and was forty years of age. Hod -and Gun, [Contributions to this column, addressed "Gamebag," will be welcomed. They should be concise, and must be signed with the writer's full name and address, not for publication, but as a Suarantee of authenticity.2 IBy Gamebag.l There arc no remarkable catches about Wellington to record this wedc, but the bags secured have been well up to the average. An Ashburton angler, Mr. H. G. Berryman, succeeded .ast week in landing what is said to be the biggest fish ever caught in the Ashburton River. It turned the scale- at 131b 2oz. The fish was 32in in length and 21|in iv girth". It was caught with phantom sol&kin whitebait, at th-a mouth of the river, several others falling to the same angler. Mr. Richman aho secured a very large fish m the sama locality,- weighing 14.b, a/.d measuring '31in by 17£ in. Mr. H. En en, of Temuka, when fishing m the Opihi River the other evening, had a rather novel experience. He secursd a bile that promised to be a fair sized trout, and diligently plied his rod with a view of effecting a landing. This was done, but the supposed .trout turned out to bo a large, water rat, which had doubtless 1 become hookecHas it xtus swimming the river. It is hi^h time trout-netting and sale of trout a ere legalised as regards Lake Elksnicro (sajs Christchurch Truth). The present position of affairs is supremehridiculous. Here is Christchurch, with about the worst fish supply in the colony, gradually «:bo-\ed out. her great natural reservoir. \Viiy? Becaus.o, forsooth, certain groups of individuals choose to obtain Government facilities to import trout and loo?cd ociUin of those trout in the Lalco! j£»yen supposing that' the sport of 'these individuals buffered from tlie fishermen vho aupply Christchurch, is that any reason why weeds and trout should monopolise the lake 13ut, as a ' matter of fact, sport ■ docs not suffer, but is improved by netting. Possibly fish from waters otiier thailLako E.leo mere m-.y be ottered for % sale, but thercis as much of this -ort of thing now as there nill be sly -grogging in Ashbuvton after next June.•'infers at, Ihe Opihi, Tcnraka, and Wattnki livers reporo having had some good srport, lately, though the big fish have not yet made their* apcrnnce. A Timani ' angler s'ecr.rcd </7 fish in the OpiM in v couple of liouvs, the fkh weighing, in the aggregate, 301b. One day lasl i ec-k ('ays a Blenheim paper) 'Mr. A.- G. Jvnapp, County Overseer, was crossing the Wai-iti stream at Spring Grovei tt.hen some distance away he noticed a seagull vigorously attacking seme' object stranded in tb.3 shallows. s The bird ' allowed Mr. Knapp to get Very close before flying off a short distanco. Mr. Knapp was very muclf surprised to find that the prey was a fins trout, subsequently found to weigh 3lb. .It is surmised that the gull drove the fish from Ihe pool above into the shallows, and,. then proceeded to make its meal. Tlfe onslaught had ueen directed at the head, some portions of which had been torn away. ■ The^ well known pigeon shot Mr., Donald M'lntosh, writing to- a Melbourne friend about the Monte Carlo .season, Eiiys : — "The . pigeon : shooting' was a •jrealor success than in any previous season, and as- usual the English division carried oil a v number of good prizes. With very little luck, Mr. Fawkuer Wood would' have won the Grand Prix, being a finer shot all round than the winner, Signor Grasselli, who won first' prize, as in his cousin did a few years' ago. The second prize, however, amounted to several hundred pounds. The Italians are "fine shots, and nob that only, but they send, more men in the field at Monte Carlo than any other nation. WSiile the average Britisher, goes to have a jolly good time during his stay of a month Or two, the Italians as a Dody keep quiet, seldom drink, never bet, and therefoie are seen to best advantage. They have many fine clubs in Italy, and never fail to give Englishmen or Australians a hearty welcome, and if by chance you beat their best, and you need some luck to do it, why, your welcome is assured. Their King is a patron of their best clubs, where everything is carried on perfectly. Just this week I met a few Italian gentlemen from Florence. They, asked with all kindness, Where is your Australian brother, Mr. Eales? Oh, how he did. shoot in Florence! We would like to see him again.' So if this accomplished Sydneyite, Arthur Eales, should read these lines, it ' will be pleasant, to him to hear of their kind expressions of good feeling, follow- I ing his great success amongst them. The Italians shoot best at 30 yards, and will hold their own better at that range than if they shoot against such men as A. E. Smith' and A. W. Eales at greater distances. Young Australians will naturally wish to know if there is anything »iew in guns, cartridges, or powder here. Perhaps the principal thkig is the onetrigger gun being used by some of the best pigeon shots, and claimed to have some advantage, but doubtless it adds a little more intricacy to the mechanism. Already some swear by it as being perfection, but, like all new patents, there aie -4. great many imperfect sfngle-trig ger patents on the market, and some on good makers' guns.i As for explosives fdi shot guns, there are new kinds in galore every season, and each i 3 represented to be better than any other. But if you go to any respectable gun maker he' will tell you that nons surpass ihe original £>mokeleEB powdera when all qualities are taken into account, and the

same story, strange enough, applies to French gun makers and their explosives also." Angling has made considerable strides, not only in popular favour, but also in the direction of improved rods and tackle, during the past half-century (says au English paper). The fly rod, for instance, of the fifties, was long, heavy in the butt, and whippy at the top, the very reverse of what we now know to be the best form of weapon. The line used for casting was as light as possible, and of silk and hair, without dressing of any kind. Since then we have learned the line should be fairly heavy to ensure accuracy in casting, and, therefore, it is now made of silk and dressed with boiled oil and (unfortunately) other things. Thei salmon-fly of that faraway period was a simple thing compared with the modern gorgeous creations, which are more sugestive of new and original tropical birds than anything that is to be found in the air above these islands or that swim in the waters surrounding them. Cycling, ■ CBr Dagonet.] The Hokitika Centre of the League of Wheelmen at its last, meeting resolved to permit registered riders to compete at unregistered meetings, and unregistered riders to take part in registered meetings. 1 The Hokitika Club is at present the only cycling body on the Coast holding allegiance to the League. A news item that will interest cyclists as much as Taylor's visit is the fact that Robl (Germany) and Dickentmann (Holland), two of the finest pace-followers in the world, are due at Melbourne about Christmas Day. R. Lehr, the business manager of these two riders, arrived in Melbourne during ilast week, and no donbt we will learn" more of the proposed movements of the visiting cracks, who will be accompanied by their six pacing experts and their ih'otor pacing machines (tandems — two) and motor bicycles (two). As Robl has during the past European season several times established new figures for, the world's hour record \t\ competition (his best performance being over 45 miles in the hour), the Australian sports-going public have a treat in store. \ J. Megson, the New South Wales champion, 'hes many supporters in Sydney,' who aver that when Megson is in good trim he is not second to even Don Walker when it comes to sprinting. The Australian Club (Sydney) is evidently of the same opinion, for it is reported that it hus "decided to back Megson for £100 ■ against the redoubtable "Major" Taylor next January. SucL a match would no doubt be a. good draw, but more so if #t were made a trio matchi with Walker included. Walker would easily find backers for such an event, and in the writer's opinion Don Walker' in fornr would finish in front of the New South Wales crack, and also ahead of even the flying" "Major," ui)le?s Taylor rides right up to his very best European form. For its population Westralin, gives the richest cycle prizes' in the world. Fancy £-100 for. one day's racing! Yet this is what the Westrol Cycle Meeting is giving at Coolgardic on Boxing Dny. The. principal event is the Westral Wheel Ilncc of £300, divided up as follows: — First, £200; second, £70; third, £30 Other events on tho programme are — a five-miles tcratch race, a maiden race, and two handicaps of £25 each. This meeting is one of the events of the year in Coolgardie, some eight thousand people paying for admission last year. The promoters -of the meeting certiinly deserve every credit for their enterprise in issuing such an attractive programme. ' It is reported that ore of the biggest cycle hourcs in the Commonwealth is shortly landing a powerful "Soncin" motor pacing machine for the use of their riders during season. Should the machine bo as powerful as reported (tenhorse power) then maybe Morgan or Beauchamp will have an opportunity of showing "what they are capable of doing behind up-to-date pace. An Australian writer on Martin's proposed visit — "W. Martin is off to New Zealand after tho Austral meeting for two or three months' racing. -This is to be regretted, for Martin is the only cyclist in Australia, at present with fast enough pace to compete against the champions Robl and Dickentmann with any chance of success. Again, one won'd think that Martin would prefer to stay here and take his char.cc in open competition against 'Major', Taylor and the a.bove two cracks instead of clearing off to *~ew Zealand, , where no doubt he can mnko a certainly of appearance-money. Is it that Martin 13 'goin;?' off,' or tint the- promoters won't pay him appearancemoney?" The Appeal Board of the League of ! Victorian Wheelmen * has dismissed • Walker's appeal against hii recent disqualification for alleged "stiff" riding., licucn Tennis* : iBY HUKA. ) vThe six championship meetings held • anrually in Sydney, Melbourne, Adei laide, Perth, Brisbane, and Western Aius- , trralia, to decide the singles and doubles ■ champions of the respective States, have • all been held, and the names of tho chami pions of ISO 2 can now be published as , under: — New South Wales: Champion, : W. V. Eaves (Victoria) ; doubles champfons, H. Rice and L. E. Gaden (.seu : South Wales) ; lady champion, Miss Pay- :' ten (New Ejouth Wales). Victoria : Chami' pion, N. E. Brookes (Victoria) ; doubles • champions, N. E. Brookes and J. R. s Fraser (Victoria) ; lady champion, Miss , Gyton (Victoria). South Australia : ChamI pion, C. 'V. Heath (Victoria) ; doubles . champions,' C. V. Heath (Victoria) and i J. R. Baker (South Australia) ; lady • champion, ' Miss Payne (South Australia). l Western Australia: Champion, L. G. , Saxon (Victoria) ; doubles champions, L. , G. Saxon and T. Kitchen (Victoria) ; [ lady champion, Miss Black (Victoria). . Queensland: Champion,, H. B. Row- ' lands (Queensland) ; doubles champions, [ H. B. Rowlands and E. W, H. Fowles > (Queensland) ; lady champion, Miss M. [ Maut (Queensland). Tasmania ; Cham- » pion, J. L. Gough (Hobart) ; lady cham'- [ pion, Miss A. Jamicson (Victoria). The lawn tennis championship of Eu- , roue came off in the covered courts at . Queen's Club, West Kensington. This is • the first time the championship has been | ' held in London. H. L. Doherty met H. - S. Mahoney in the final, and the match : created tho keenest interest. Doherty • won the rubber, 4— -6, 6—4,6 — 4, 6—3,6 — 3, 6—l.6 — 1. - Mahoney was called in the second set, ; and it put him off hLs ' game. In aM I earlier round, the position of his left foot i on the l)ack line (old rule) when serving , had given rise to some criticism, and «v- • a result he was carefully watched in the ■ final, with tho above result, Why on ; earth wait for the finnl and most important match and then watch a man " carefully." Had Mahoney been called iv > the former round he could still have won j it, and then in the final ho .would have i guarded against that fault. This is just an example of how a, man can be put oul of a big event by some weak-minded s umpire or linesman, H. L. Doherty met Mahoncy at Wimbledon, and when tht i rubber showed 4—6,4 — 6, 4—6,4 — 6, B—6, 2—o. s Maliony retired unwell. It was on thus 1 performance that e*?cty one thought tl>p - Irishman would extend H,L., Lul, ala« ! t the game was not fought out as expected !• On the same courts, the final of the 2 Open Doubles nearly prevJded a surpifce. 1 Aa it was, Hillyard and Cazalet jti^t j miased beating the Doheyty pair, the pre-

sent American champions and ex-English champions by 3 sets to love ; but it was not to be. With the scores 6—3, 7—5,7 — 5, * B—lo,8 — 10, the match was pdjourned. After the former pair tecured the first two sets, and had come within an ace of the third set, the Dohertys showed what coolness could do, and >won the set 10 — 8. When play was resumed next day, the fourth set went to the champions, 6—3,6 — 3, and fifth and final set saw them with a lead, 4—o,4 — 0, but Hillyard and Cazalet came with a great rush ; in fact, they had recovered the brilliancy which had characterised their performance of the day before, and made it 4 all. Going on, they made it 5—4,5 — 4, and with flillyard serving got to 40 — 30 — just an ace to win — but, no, the Dohertys, experienced in crises, saved the day and made it 5 all. The spectators almost held their breath, so keen was the tension. Five more times in the course of the next four games were the brothers within a stroke of disaster ; on each occasion a subtle hand and a cool head came to the rescue. Finally, Hillyard again lost his service, which put " Little Doe " and ' Jbsig Doe " " one up," and in the next game " R. F." ("Big Doe), who by the bye is fully six feet in height, sent down some beautiful *' curlers that had the desired effect. The great game was over. H. L. and R. F. Doherty, five successive years doubles champions of both England and Ireland, had also become doubles champions of Europe. H. L. Doherty on American play pad players, has given his impressions of his recent visit to America. More time is devoted in the States to lawn tennis than in England, and the people as well as the - press are incomparably more concerned for its interests. The American people attend by the thousands to see the players compete — the latter are always in good training, and throughout the winter are hard at play in some form or other. American experts depend on brilliancy and speed ; English adepts prefer a more careful, scientific style. The Yankees take more chances, and go for tho shot with the idea of winning outright. They go right up to the net, intenb on killing, but ones form has to bo perfect before this can be prudently done; the miscalculation of an inclrmay cost the st-ike. They do not drive much harder th $ the English, but the latter follow thu/r drives with the arms and bodies, and this makes the stroke appear a trifle elower. The English do not smash like our Yankee cousins do ; careful volleying is just as effective, and it costs less energy. Whitman and Lamed, as well as Ward and 1 Davis, the American champions, have made up their minds to play at the championship meeting ' at Wimbledon. They fire after the "ashes" that the Dohertys captured. A fairly good te?.m, hotii in numbers and quality, of local players will bo attending the 'championship meeting" at Nelson. Yet I am disappointed that several of the youn.eer clubs are not beins represented. If players have any ambition to advance in their play they should attend these meeting?, and I am sure that a trip to Nelson would have done them good. ' The final of Victoria College doubles will be fought out between the winners of the Richmond and Thompson (scr.) v. Gawith and Bee (15) heat and Bogle and Nagle (10). Beere has dirplaced Richmond for pride of place (S— 7). Wilson, by beating Pnru&e (9 — 8), has now been placed third man. Bee defeated Batham (9 — 3), and Seddon put Thompson down (9 — 8). The Shield matches were continued last Saturday, and Victoria College gave Wellington a beating by 6 rubbers %o 3, or 12 sets to 6. The games were, more even, 86—78. The ladies were fairly well matched-^-Miss Traversi in particular, showing improvement. Wilson, of the Wellingtons, alone .'bowed that he has not neglected his practice, and he is an object-lesson to the others of that team. Brown has not shown the advancement that ho promised lr&t ye-ir, what " dart " has now pierced that player's peace of mind? MacArthur — not the Mac o£ old. Give some of the younger players a show now. The other match j ■was won by Thorndon, wlrich had a team j in that was fit to hold its own against i anything in New Zealand. Brougham Hill went down (but not so badly as many had expected) by 7 rubbers to 2, or 14 sots to 4. Ninety-six games to 46 does not look so well, but it does not really give ( the true account of the play. I have been supplied by one of the bsst judges of tennis with a few remarks upon the younger club's players in the above Shield contest. The following is a brief outline : — The ladies' play has reached comparatively a far higher standard than the men's. Mies Ward was very* pool and steady. Placed with excellent judgment. Tho game she adopted was the correct one to puzzle Miss Gore, and beat that lady all the t : me. With a liitle experience and some mixed double play with first-cla^s men, ■■-he would be one of the best players in the colony. At present, her "drives are hardly low enough and consequently lack pace. She should go {o Nelson and play in the games vhere she -would gain mo*e experience than in a dozen club matches. Miss Robinson has a distinctly good service, but her shots are also of the h'gli nature which allows the 1 opponent too much time to reach the ball, and is only a good line of play to adopt when one is a volleyer and who follows the stroke to the net, when the slowlytravelling ball gives one time to get in position for the volley. Misses Gore or Marchant would probably win every time on grass against tho two abovenamed ladies, but there is no reason why, if after attending one or two championship meetings and taking part in the mixed doubles, they should not be able to hold their own against all comers. Ladies generally can read and digest the above lines, as well as the following: — " Nothing develops a girl's coolness of judgment, fertility of resource, and accuracy of placing like a hot mixed with a good volleyer on the other side of the net." Of the men, Gower is the best. He is a real sticker. His power of picking up and returning everything is very great, and to score a game more ' (ban Laishley wiis an excellent perfoimnnce, of which he may well be proud. Places well and lobs with judgment. Club matches and championships will soon put some pace on his shots. He is alwaj's on the defensive, which would tell heavily on him in a long mutch. "Hit harder and make your opponent move more." Base-line play is sound, uses his head well, but bis yol-lej-ing might be given some attention. Amies has a fine forehand drive, but seems afraid to use it. Being quite young, has a future before him if he gets good practice. His drive is a scoring shot which should be followed up oftener. His backhand is safe, but lacks swing and consequently pace. His chief weakness on Saturday was the number of short length shots he made, which placed him continually in a lcaing position. Just the man 'to gain experience and style i .1 »■'»■!■■■* ■mam m » wrniw wii™ nw

at a championship meeting. Swanston carried too many guns for for Fiaser. flic latter plays a plucky as well as energetic game, and has a good asrvicc. | Plays remarkably well for the time lie j has been at it. Might have been a } " star f> ha 4 he started when in his "teens." Howe, the fourth man, lrcln pace in his work, service too short and soft. Too readily anticipates, defeat. Good hard match play will improve him. All men weaker in the doubles than tho singles, bub club matches wiil remedy j this. Fraser and Howe played one up j and one back, which rendered their chance hopeless. Swanston is an excel- j lent model for them all to copy in this branch of the game. When Thorndon meets Victoria College in the final, I hope to have a few lines likewise re that young club, which may assist them, and at any rate will point out their faults — a part all time lovers of sport aim to discover and remedy. Petone Ist, on their own ground, played and defeated Newtown in a, club match by $ sets to 5 or 92 games to 76. Scores as follows : — Jackson v. Bedward, 9—29 — 2 ; Kirk v. West, 7—9 ; Dr. Perry v. Wilson, 9—5 ; J. Rose v. O: Redward, 9—B ; Mr 3. Rose v. Misrs Clark, 7—l; Miss Jackson v. . Miss Glasgow, 7—6;7 — 6 ; Kirk and Jackson v. Bros., 9—79 — 7 ; Dr. Perry and Reid v. West and Wilson, 9—4;9 — 4 ; Rose Bros. v. Brailsford and Kiely, 9—B;9 — 8 ; Mrs. Rose and Miss Jackson v. Misses Clark and Glasgow, 7—5; Mrs. Yvilkinpon and Miss Carley v. Misses Fraser and Glasgow, 7—6;7 — 6 ; Mrs. Wilkin son and W. H. Rose v. Miss Glasgou and Kiely, 7—l;7 — 1 ; Miss Carley and Reid v. Miss Fraser a,nd TBrailsford, 7—3.7 — 3. Horoldwi Valley v. Brougham Hill 3rd was played on the latter's court? The Vallay players showed improve! form, and are coming on nicely. The town club won by 8 sets to 5 or 94 same to 64. Freeman got a shock from Millen, and C. Smith also extended W. Howd past his limit — both good wins. Victoria College 2nd was defeated on the Parliamentary courts by the Brougham .cull 2nd, although the margin was--a narrow one — 7 sets to 6, or S2 gamc^ to 79. Kirker met the best player, Bogle, although the latter was playing second man in the team. It looked like a bad beating for Kirker when the score read B—l,8 — 1, but he " got going " and added four games to his score before Boglr got that anxious "one." In the match De la Mare v. Duncan, bad scoring put the latter off his game ; yet that is ro excuse and a. player should not lose that control of himself when a game is at stake. Umpires are only mortals after all, but bad umpires are — well, some people call 'em '' bad spirits." They should sit anywhere but on an umpire's chair. If players think honestlj that a man cannot umpire, be honest, and tell him so before the match, then — well — most men would say," Sight, get some one else. ' Miss Pag« played a rattling game, and never let Mrs. Howe in at allj the latter lady has not yet overcome thai nervousness when playing in a match— * never mind, be plucky and stick to it your reward will come in time, but play in as many contests as possible. Reid will make his mark yet if he keeps his present form going. Fine double player. ' The men's "ladder" of the Broughhm 'Hill Club got pulled about last week W. Fra^er put J. A. B. s Howe out for second ' rune, 9—6. Hunter has done the record, beat Kirker, 9—5,9 — 5, then Gower defaulted for fifth place, also Bell for fourth, and Howe after a hard fight gave Hunter No. 3 places-game 13 — 11. Amies defied Fraser, a-s the score shows, 9—7.9 — 7. In consequence of Miss Ward (10) beating Miss Robinson (scr.), 40 — 25, and Miss A. Word winning from Mrs. Pierard. (9), 40 — 32, there is a, possibility that the sisters will fight tho final out, should Miss A. Ward beat Miss Hurley in the semi final. Swimming. " i — [Br SiDE-STKOKE.] The fourth annual carnival of the Swifts Club, which was held at the Te Aro Baths on Saturday last, was a most successful meeting, and from a. swimming point of view eclipsed the one. held at the same place last year, when the baths were first opened. The attendance last week was not as large as could have been desired, or the quality of the sport ' deserved. ' The first race of the day — 50yds ' maiden — was won by C. M'Donald, who sprung a surprise on everybody by win- . ning both his heats and the final with the greatest ease. T. T. Halbert, who : also won a heat rather easily, spoilt whatever ' chance he had in the final by 1 swimming a crooked course and running ■ into the side of the baths before he had ; covered half the distance. The winner [ of the 100 yds Inter-Club Handicap turft- . edilp in B. Stubbs, who swam a really s fine race, and fully deserved his success. > I The Ladies' Bracelet, of 50yds, was the • { most exciting race of the day. A good ', finish between McDonald and Gleeson [ was anticipated, as .the' first-mentioned j swimmer did his heat in 33 l-ssec, and : the flatter in 33 2-ssec. The anticipa- [ tion was fully justified, 'the final resolv- ! ing itself into a struggle between these > two, M'Ponald eventually getting home r by a touch. The finish was so close that [ the spectators were left in. doubt as to . who had really won until the recordboard told them. Although ten entries

had besn received for the 200 yds Club Handicap, only four men started, viz., F. J. Ballinger 32sec, G. C. Girdlestone 25sec, A. J. Styles 15sec, and J. Blundell 12sec. Duriii" me first quarter of tho journey Ba'.linger kept in the lead, followed by Girdle«tone, Styles, and Blunck-ll in the order named. Before the second stietch had been covered the las>t three men had pulled up on tho leader, and the scratch man (Blundell) had worked up to second place. Swimming a strong, steady stroke, he took the lean before ""another haif-length had been traversed, and eventually won by about thiee yards without being asked to show what was left in him. Ballinger was second, about four feet ahead of Girdlestone. Styles -n as not really in tho hunt, and he retired at the beginning of the I last fifty yards. Very poor form was shown in the 50yds Boys' Handicap. The form in the diving competition was not ot a very high quality, only three of the competitors, M'Donald, Moore, and ' Johnson, being up to the average. The others, seemingly j" did not take the mattoo seriously — at least I hope they did not. Tho comic diving in fancy costume wits a great success, and the antics o.nd decorations of the halt-dozen competitors kpt the spectators highly amused. C. Mcore was in his element, and did some really clever things. Considerable interest was evinced in the swimming under water, which was won* by i<\ W. Vosseler, who covered about forty yro-ds. The nearest man to him was W. Skegg, with about thirty -five yards to his credit. G. D'Emden was going strong \rhen at about twenty- eight yards," but he spoilt his chance by taking a crooked course and endeavouring to carry away one oi the pile: oi the bath with Ms head. A good deal of dissatisfaction was expressed at last iSaturday's carnival with regard to the charge for admission, especially by those taking part in the races. I am informed by the Secretary of the club that the only conditions uponwhich the City Council -nould allow the club the use of the baths was that one shilling per hend should be charged foi every person entering the baths. This, of course, included competitors and ofV ficials of the club. The officials have an unenviable task, and are kept going ,at high pressure with. Jjo reward but the advancement of the sport, so the least that can be expected it that thoy should be allowed into the baths free of cost. As the baths are run fit present, there is not the least encouragement given to swimming clubs. The sports meetings which are held are given solely for the entertainment of the public, the clubs never making anything out of them. An average meeting means a return of say £10 to- a club, and out of this amount the City Council demands £5, or in. other words half the total receipts. Perhaps if the present condition of affairs is put iully before the City Council ttyvb body will see its way to make Ihe terms easier, with a view of encom aging the swimming clubs of the district. C. M'Donald, who won the Maiden Kace, Ladies' iiracelet, and diving competition at last Saturday's sports, is a promising young swimmer." He is only a lad, and has not yet finished his school days, but tiie is very fast over a 50yds sprint The new handicapper for thr Swifts Club, Mr. J. Evans, deserves every credit for the manei in which he carried out his onerous task in connection with last week's carnival. The finishes were generally close, and in the Bracelet the excitement rose to a very high pitch. As Mr. Seddon lately said of a British leader in South Africa, "He is the right man in the right place." A noticeable feature about the Swifts carnival was the number of new swimmers, who put in an apearance on the starting-board, also the number of men, < who, although really good swimmers, are never seen competing at any of the other club carnivals. ' The prompt manner in which -the races, were got ofi was the subject of remark-J last Saturday, and the officials are to', be congratulated on the way in whicb.^ they carried out their duties. > The first event (50yds Handicap) for; the President's Cup, in connection with, the Wellington Club, was got off at the 1 ! Te Aro Baths oji Monday last in very' rough water. The race was won rather' easily by J\ Eoberts in 29sec, "W. Stone, 7sec, \^as second, and F. Wilton, 4sec, third. ' The other starters werg G. Wilkes lsec, A. J. Styles 4sec, T. Shields and G.. Hill 6sec, B. Hill and W. H. Pollock lOsec. The Teams Race, which was to have been held by the Thorndon Club on Wednesday afternoon, was postponed. The necessity for the erection of some suitable acc'ommodatioh for bicycles a x (r the Te Aro Baths was very apparent last Saturday. The machines had to be left on the road outside the baths, where they made an imposing spectacle, and more than one owner heaved a sigh of relief on finding his bicycle safe at the conclusion of the sports. Independent of the safety question, it is quite a work of art getting the inside machines out. This matter of accommodation was brought up at a meeting of the City Council on 28th Novemoer, 1901, when it was left in the hands of the City Engineer. The sport is booming in Greymouth just at present, the approaching championship meeting, which is to be held on

sun

2oth December, being the cause. A large nvmber of Chri&tchuruh swimmers will compete at this meeting, including BulliAvho has been selected to repre cnt Canterbury in the New Zealand champion^hips. Jls stated before, F. Roberts will rcpre&ent Wellington. Every effort is being made to ensure the success of the gathering, which promises to be of more than ordinsry interest. A new attraction called a "Blindfold Touch-ball" competition -was introduced, into a recent swimming gala at Sydney — nanu-ly : "A polo ball is suspended from th:' centre of a rope running across the m.ddie of the baths, and the first of tho competitors (who are started from iha side of the enclosure) to touch the b.'ll wins. The fun comes in through ilie swimmers losin? their reckoning, as they very quickly do, and making desperate grabs and lunges at vacancy* in the hope of reaching tho leather sphere, which may bo many yards away from tlim, or, after a couple of turrs kire bsa.> in -c'o they may fi:;d themselves s mr -f> away from it altogether." Th's competition, if nos run too long, would no doubt he a very popular one, and might well be tried by one of the local clubs. In a levicw of the past swimming season, Baily's Magazine alludes to the races in v.hich Jarvia and other English swimmers competed on the Continent. The ■writer says: — "The times recorded do not appear exceptionally fast, but it is nob generally known that on the Continent the race's start in the water, that no dive in h allowed, and that there is no push off at the ends. It is swimming pure and simple from start to finish." The late-it issue of the Sidney Referee to hand states that Fred T - and George Read, who ha.vc bee.n on isit to England, were e3pected home Li«t week. It was intended to give the two cracks a hearty welcome back The opportunity ■was also to be taken to present half-a-dozon medals to Read, all of which were won before ho left for England

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SPORT AMD PASTIME., Evening Post, Volume LXIV, Issue 149, 20 December 1902, Supplement

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SPORT AMD PASTIME. Evening Post, Volume LXIV, Issue 149, 20 December 1902, Supplement

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