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SPORT AND PASTIME. The Turf.

[By Cbackshot.]

RACING FIXTURES. August 12, 14, and 16— C.J.C, Grand National August 13— Woodlands Hut Club Annual September 4 and s— Marton J.C. Hack September 3, 5, 10, 13— Australian Jockey Club's Sprtog the hutt Winter meeting. The beautiful weather which favoured the local club for its Winter Meeting attracted tho largest attendance that ha 8 yet been seen* at the Hutt in tho winter /time, but nevertheless tho totalisator returns showed the big falling olf of £3578 as compared with last year, whilo there whs only a small increase aguinst the figures for' 1900. However, it is satisfactory to learn that notwithstanding Jiho increase- of £450 in stakes, tho club twill come out on the right side of th« {ledger. Still, with the splendid weather the club should have- wade a large profit, •and thus wiped off Home of its big- overdraft. There seems a tendency among [■tome of the stewards to go to extremes fin raising the- prizes and' rearranging the [programme. This should be avoided unml the club is out of debt. Owners have fbeen well looked after in the pait, and ;were well satisfied with the stakes offered. '.* I could not account for the poor exCblbition of jumping at tho meeting. Tho 6;ronnd was firm enough, and tho obtaeles. were not stiff by any means, alIbhough some were "tricky." YeC down Jthe competitors came like ninepins, and tamang the number wero several wellytried 'chasers. I discussed tho matter miUh. several old racing men, and each lukd his own individual opinion, one putJtilhg it down to the "tricky" course; an- | tether to the strong pace set; another to itht slovenly jumping by the competitors; while one, whoso opinion is worth taking notice of, considers the* the 'whole fault lies at the door of the club.. He is of opinion that immediately on. the taonoluiion of a meeting the holes made . Ay the jumping brigade should) be filled up with soil, and tiy the time of the fqext meeting there would be an even turf. At the present tune the holes are ,DlUd up with a Hundy soil just previous yto a meeting, with the result that when I* horse puts hia foot in an old hole the ? loose soil gives way, and causes disaster. Thi» state of affaire should not be allowAd to exist, and the caretaker should be instructed to fill tip all the holes on the steeplechase, course «$' once, and thus form j«n eren ticrf and good take-offs at the Bumps. Then that water jump should! [be made so that a- horse going at it can •obtain an idea of what he is taking on, aiuate?.d of discovering, when too late, jthat there is a deep ditch on the other > side. 4 The. Jufy Sbeeplephase brought? ofct eleven runners, ana six of them completed the course, those that came to grief beliag Rufus, Kohunui.T Awohuri, Hylos, tend Sudor. For the ia«t six furlongs the arace resolved itself into a duel between 'Plain Bill annd iStraybird, and Higgins •aviug the Flintlock horse until coming bo tho last hurdle he won decisively', at tho end. Plain Bill's last victory prior to Saturday's race was in the Welling■toii Steeplechase of 1900, and his owner nMr. T. Scott) certainly deserved a win [for purseverii^g with the old horse since be went wcoug two years 'ago. The horse looked rather light on it, brought about |by recent racing. Whangoroa. again fenced well, but his condition gave out ,nfter passing the utund the second time. was very tired at the end, and Lochade, staying on, frxxt Ceat Win for third money. Mudinon also joined in in the battle for tho 10 soys, and .very little separated the 'trio. Shylock finwhed a long way behind. Kohunui was* going well in a good position when he stumbled on landing over uae bush opposite the stand tho second time round and unseated Lind. Thtfre is no doubt he can jump, ,«a evidenced' by the enormous leap he . jninde at the first fence in Saturday's ;ruce and the nice way he cleared the sod jwall, post and rails, and water— he fell at tho water the first day. But some of tho other obstacles he took risks at, and ultimately he came to grief. Awahuri is another that can jump if he likes, bute he "chances" his fences too much. Shyjlock, who had beon going really well m f!his work, and had jumped splendkHy, jwhen racing lost ground at his feaces, nnd would not try. { The Swimmer is a nice even, jumper, and he won. the Second Hack and HunHers' Steeplechase in fine style. The Aucklanders seem to think he has no chance in tha Grand Natioaol Steeplechase, conteo-aing that the distance is far for him, but nevertheless I am P*— "tisfied he has an outside chance in the cc. Any way, he should have no dimJtyin negotiating the comntry. Osbonje's succe»9 in the Tinal Hurdle [Race was another instance of the glorious gncert/iinty of the game. On his first Vtoy's racing, when He died out of the Maiden Hurdle contest at a mile, he did toot appear to have the remoteit chance an better company over a mile aud threeiqttttrter course. Still, he was always ift ' kti fliKht ' antl Bf *Ned! off a desperate from Royri.l Conqueror in the :SJMt two furlongs. Osborne's win would Wo A. Peters a real, good turn, as things '(have not been too good with "TOad" of »aate. Old Osborne. has had a. chequered j "career. After various vicissitudes he fell ' 2%° DaTie * * httndß » an <i he P«Ued foff a £30 odd dividend with him in a SFlvmg at the Hutt. He won several !*>tne/i- races for Davies, "but he could not 'i>e depended upon, to run in the same way Jtwice, and ©veiifaally ho became the proof VV. Jorgensen. His new owner ( «nd not have any luck with the horse on • the flat, so rmt him at hurdle racing, but Line met wi'tb an accident at New PlyJ -|3nouth wh.en racing over hurdles, and ]f thinking 'his racing days wore ov»r the (owner Piade a present of hha to A. .■Peters. The latter doctored him up, !»nd eventually got him fit to mcc. He SiaL On fA Btako * or J ' eters in a' flying handikC&P at Masterton, and then there was V*tT OU aa '' *° tno uorHes ownership, bub >fiPe¥ era won tho day, and he rwt remained an. his stable ever since. The horso show•Vi promise nt the Otaki Meeting as a. fcrurdler, but his chance was ruined by /Bais rider being unaole to keep him back .< jto his field. Fahey was able to da so on ujußaturday,u jußaturday, and this won him tho race. J d Another bock number, in Titok'i, scor- . «d in the first race of the day — fc'ae Hutt i (Flying. With St. Olga getting off last, there was not much to beat, and the old fellow buttled out a tough finish with Zealous, Hokio, and Ringlet*!. Tho last trio all bear an unenviable reputation for < shirking things, yet two of them — Zealous \rsnd Ringlet— came on very^ well at the (end for once. .f The Maiden Hack Race wns again won "by a two-year-old, and it is about time itnat "haoks," not young racehorses, gob *\* chance. Dodojia, tho vriiincr, is a solid ttlly by Hotchlrjss— Sybil, and ran like a stayer. Geopclie got a break on in the first few furl/jngs, and Wilson had to ride Dodona to catch the Aucklander. But ■when Dodona got on terms with Qeordie it was all over. Both should be heard of again. Penetration showed 'pace for four furlongs, but, then died away. , I think Mr. Knox displayed poor judgment in taking Platypus out of the six furlongs race and saving him for the mile Winter Oats. On hei; rug in the mile race she would have won the shorter race. The last furlongs found her out, and Loch Erin, ridden a pretty race by C. Jenkins, caught her inside the distance, and won nicely. Cave ran creditably, while Oracle and St. Olga finished j fowtfa *ri fifth tViHiotinly.

The success of Waiwhera in the Hack Handicap came as no surprise to mo, as her galloons previous to the meeting were quite good enough to win perhaps soinethiivg better than hack races. She wus unfortunate to lose the first duy'x race. With F. Davies in the saddle, she was brought along from the home turn, und easily settled Laureate, while the latter in turn was just snuffed out by the funtfinishmg Lissu for second money. Lisua had a bad run right through tho race. ' Arohii wuh carried off his legs in CSe first part, and he finished fourth. MR. WATSON'S TRIP TO AUSTRALIA. Mr. F. Watson, tho owner of Battleaxe, who canto buck from the Australian trip on Wednesday, went on to New Plymouth by Thursday morning's train, accompanied by Mrs. VVatsou. They both eujoyed tfheir trip, although, as Mr. Watson lemurkod, it was rather too exponsive. Those with whom they came in contact, ©specially the V.R.C. Secretary (Mr. By ran Moore) and Mr. Archie Yuile — the latter an auctioneer, "and all auctioneers are good fellows," said Mr. Watson, nnd drily added he was one himself — treated thorn right royally and showed them everything worth seeing. The Flemington course with its splendid and extensive appointments was a revelation to Mr. Watson, whose first visit it was to the great racecourse. Everything was laid- out on suoh a grand scale that it almost seemed that it was larger than, required, but lio was given, to understand that the requirements were at times, especially on Cup days, even inadequate. The racing track was a splendid one from an owner's point of view, but, being such a large course— about the flame size as the Riccarton course it was difficult to see the whole of a race except from the natural grandstand— the thill. Questioned as to what he thought of fflie Victorian Hurdle Race, Mr. Watson «aid it was a very hard race to win. It needed a well-seasoned hurdler to have any chance. The race just decided was the fastest on record— the first mile and ia-half was run in 2min 53iseo, and the last in 2min 54Jb6c— so the competitors were galloping all the way. Colonel Shilinski, inTMr. Watson's opinion, was unlucky to lose. Mooney, on Rawdon, got alongside the Colonel, and tho latter's lockey could not do the horse justice. In the Doutta Galla Hurdle Race on the last day of the meeting Mooney rode Colonel Shilinski home a winner in a cantor. In the interval the Zalinski •horso had been purchased by Rawdon's owner (Mr. A. Miller) for 500 guineas. In the race for the Hurdles, Johnson et Battleaxe run to the first hurdle, and le landed over it first. There he took lold of him and ran along fourth for a few fences, gradually dropping back in i good position to about sixth place. He ran well for about two miles, and then the distance and the jumping knocked him out. and when Johnson saw that he was beaten, he did not persevere any more, and finished second to last. The horse jumped well, but the task was too trreat. When Battleaxe was allotted 9st 31b in the Braybrook Handica P*.. a mito a nd a-half flat race, against a third-rate lots on the second day, it looked a pood thing for him if at all well, and Mr. Watson backed him well at tfrree'9. Bub he finished absolutely last, «,nd his owner concluded at once that something was wrong with the horse. His conclusions were borne out by tho horse breaking a blood-vessel in tho head the same night. The horse appears all right now, but he has only ran over six furlongs afc \half-paco since, so no idea can bo obtained whether he is permanent1v injured. Battleaxe will remain at the Hntt for a "week, during which time he will be worked with a view to flndine out whether the horse is all right. If no ho will go on to Riccarton and compef« at the Grand National Meeting; Mr. Watson, did not think much of the ridinpr of the jockeys in tho flat races which bo saw, and he can't understand* why C. Jenkins's riding was criticised 1 . Ho thinks Jenkins and J. Gallastfjer could pive the Victorian jockeys ft lon p start. Several of the cross-country jo-ckevs, however, were fine iorsemen. »'nd Mr. Watson has never seen Mooney's -equal over fences. "There is nothing like experience well boujrhr," said Mr. Watson, and if ever ho should endeavour to win the Victorian , Hurdle Race again >he would know what I sorb of a horse to take over — a wellseasoned hurdler that knew the game well — one of Royal Conqueror's class. REFLECTIONS ON THE ENGLISH DERBY. "Robin Hood" in the Australasian writes: — In, making a few reflections on the Epsom week, just over, the first thing that naturally comes to one's mind is the abominable weather, the rain and cold wintry aspect generally making anything like pleasure out of the question. More especially was this so on Oaks Day. Those bookmakers who had large future «jvent books on the Derby could hardly lave don* badly, for at some time or other ab least four horses had been backed at 5 to 1, and under, these being the Duke of Westminster, Minsteod, Ard Patrick, and Sceptre, the latter of whom, as you know, ultimately started at evens. Still, of course, as Ard Patrick had been one of the winter favourites, and notwithstanding his two defeats this year never drifted 1 far back, even those who had betted long and luckily could not •have made much over the Derby itself. On the Oaks, of course, the ring would be heavy losers, although in that race, too, the betting was fairly good. In referring again to the Derby two things stand out the most prominent, ono being the unexpectedly brilliant running of Ard Patrick, and the other the poor show made by Sceptre. Of course, on Ard Patrick's two-year-old running there would be nothing surprising in his ready victory here. But his previous races this season left a general impression that he was soft-hearted; nob so much bis defeats, bub the manner of his defeats. Yeb at Epsom, now thoroughly fib and trained to the hour, he nob only won in a canter by three lengths in splendid time, 2min 42 1-Ssec, but ho finished like a lion and as straight as an arrow. Of Sceptre's Derby performance it is ■hard to know whab to- write. To an intimate friend of mine, Randall, before dismounting and fresh from the excitement of the race, said "I cannot understand it, she never 'took hold' of me, and t fhad to drive htr after bhe first half-mile". Possibly ib was this driving that upseb her. Yet at Epsom, whab can a jockey do? He must take his place or Tisk being hopelessly shut in when the descent at the famous Tottenham Corner is rounded. One thing is certain, all connected with her were quite satisfied as to her c&ndition, and that she was perfect in herself on the day. At any rate not a whisper of anything wrong reached the ring, as tho betting will prove, for at the last moment any one wanting to back hor in the ring had to put up with many refusals before he could clone with a generally very reluctant offer of evens. This price was snapped up whenever offered. Whether the policy of driving her or nob was .sight, Randall, by so doing, had her in a splendid place coming round the corner; and it was not until they came well into tho straight that she fell back, and left the race a certainty for Ard Patrick, with whom, at that moment, she w((s upsides. That Randan could have cot her into a place is generally not denied, and hin failure to do sc>, of course, raised loud complaints from those who had backed her early both woys. It would be idle to deny that suspicion as to her running was expressed ia^jnonf quart m. wh<?h bicami in*

creased after her ready victory in tho daks, and again this week when Kaiidall wus temporarily suspended by tho l.ingfield stewards for suspicious riding. This, however, is one of the first thiugH disappointment und uncharitable backers usually allege. Tn the Oaks Scoptro was ridden in a different manner entirely. She was again heavily backed, thus proving she was well,^ and started a hot favourite at 5 to 2. Thin price would have been even shorter, but there was a long delay at the poHt, and when it wus seen that it was Sceptre who was causing the trouble, by declining to face the gate, tho price lengthened The race is fully described above, so I need only mention that Randall, being given a free hand, and allowed to ride her his own way, here seemed to have chanced getting his place later on. It was well round the corner before ha came tlirougli, and luckily, through some of the leaders running wide, he got his opening, and the filly, coming away in brilliant fashion exactly where she had faltered on the Derby Day, won with ridiculous oase. The time— 2min 46 2-ssee — was oved 4sec longer than that occupied by tho Derby. But I attach no imnortanco to this in this particular case, for the course was fnr heavier on the Fri. day and the pace slower at the start. Of course, the question raised is, Is Sceptre a non-stayer if the pace is fast? I should mention that Colonel M'Cal. Mont had very bad luck uT Epsom, octsupying the unenviable position of second in both Derby and Oaks, with Rising Glass and Glass Jug respectively. [He also ran second in the ten thousand poundß (the Eclipse Stakes) this mouth with Rising Glass.] Both colt and filly were bred by himself, and are by his celebrated sire Isinglass. I may mention that there haye been a few books opened on the Leger, and that the Derby running has been accepted as correct may be taken from the fact that, whereas 6 to 4 is the best offer against Ard Patrick, 4 to 1 is offered against Soeptre, and 20 to 1 bar two. NOTES. Mr. Douglas Gordon has decided to give up racing Laureate, and he will probably send him back to his owner, Mr. Donald Fiaser, thus releasing the lease of the colt for his racing career. Tho half-brother to Advance has raced all the season, and only won one race, a £70 stoke, at tho Hutt. Handicappers have taken rather too much care, of him, and, although he has won only one race during the year, he finished up tho season on Saturday with carrying list 91b. Perhaps if the horse leaves Prosser's stable he will be given a better chance, and if so, he should win a race. His condition at the present time is splendid. J. Prosser is sending Hokio back to his owner, Mr. J. R. "NfDonald, at Levin, from whom Prosser is leasing two youngsters, the Torpedo— Rivulet colt and the Gold Reef— Wood Nymph filly, purchased at Te Mahangay sale of yearlings. Mr. A. M'Vinish, owner of Kuamahunga, has purchased the lease of a hotel at Invercargill, and takes possession next month. Tho southern town gains a good sportsman in Ruamahunga's owner. The Rioter, by Rebellion— J«onette, has joined D. Wright's stable at Napier Park. Legion of Honour, a New Zealand Cup candidate, was passed in at New Plymouth the other day for £9. After declaration of forfeits there are 30 two-year«old» remaining in the Hastings Stakes, run at the Spring Meeting of the Hawkes Bay "Jockey Club. The Hon. J. D. Ormond has left three of his youngsters by The Officer in, Mr. Stead can be represented by either King Log (Stepniak— Fairymoid) or De la Rev (Seaton Deluval— Radiant), Sir George Clifford has cried content with Ardchattan, and Mr. Hugo Friedlander has left three in. The Hutt jyoungsters— tho Castor— Bangle colt, and the Seaton Dolaval — Sunbeam filly — have continued the engagement'of their nominations. F. Higgott, the Hutt trainer, returned from his Australian trip on Wednesday. It is stated that Mr. A. Miller was unlucky to lose tho V.R.C. National Steeplechase with Error. He jumped on to the fallen Mensuration, and lost a lot of ground on consequence. At tho end he was catching the winner, Bay Eagle, and only failed by three parts of a length. San -Fran bos gone wrong, end will be put to the stud. Mr. James Ames, who has been a Steward of the Wellington Racing Club foil many years wa» token ill after returning from the Hutt Races lost Saturday, having partaken of something which was affected with ptomaine poison. In the early part of this week his condition was very serious, but his many friends will be glad to hear that he is now out of danger. Mr. Ames had only just returned from a pleasant holiday trip to the Hot Lakes District. The famous La Flecho, bought byi Sir Tatton Sykes for 12,600 guineas, has produced a good winner at last. At Epsom Baroness La Fleche, by Ladas from La Fleche, won the Acorn Stakes, of £1000 for two-year-olds, beating a large field. As a yearling Baroness La Fleche was bought by Mr. J. Musker for 5200 guineas. On 9th June Persimmon stood at the head of the winning stallions in England, with £15,617, all of which, sdve £142, had been won by Sceptro. Carbine was second, with £9970" 10s, won by seven horses. St. Florian was third, with £5692. Two useful iumpers iv Mensuration and Tib wore killed at tho concluding day of the Flemington Meeting. "Mr Lance- Wood," who had the misfortune to lose his Somus mare at the Hutt last Saturday, is an unlucky, though popular, owner, and it is about time that Dame Fortune favoured him with a smile. Leda did him some good turns several years back, and had he hung on to Melwood, the St. Leger horse would have been of service to him. But ho parted with him to Mr. Davies, and has not done any good on the turf since. He purchased Battleaxe's brother, Gorrick, as a yearling, but the colt, when showing promise, was seized with an internal affection and ultimately died a few months back. Last jumping season his mare, Nipapu, boat Qobo in the Maiden Steeplechase at the Hutt, and on that performance would have won jumping races at the Riccartan Meeting, but for breaking down. She was then sold for £15. And now Sudor, whom Mr. Lance-Wood purchased in May for £80, had to bo destroyed. The mare at the time of the accident was never better in her life, and she would have done good service for her owner next season, in hurdle races, when the ground was firmer. It is to be hoped that the local owner will have better luck with his yearling Seaton Delavel filly. Tho bookmakers on the Hutt course were besieged with money for Waiwhera in the final race at the Hutt last Saturday, and some of the money found its way into the machine, otherwise her dividend (£4 12s) would have been greater. Lissa also had a good following with the pencillcrs. Both mares are owned by bookmakers. As Gobo showed slight Bigns of stiffness on account of his exertions in the Wellington Steeplechase, he was not started at the Hutt on Saturday. The Swlmmor left here last Monday for Riccarton. A southern penciller accepted £700 about Siege Gun for the New Zealand Cup at 100 to 5 during the Wellington Meeting, and it is expected that after tho National Meeting the horse will be nt a shorter prioe for the Cup. On the other hand. Grand Rapids, another of Mr. Pt»*ri'a Qondtdiittii hti rtpaivftd strong

Mi|jpovl. Tlu 1 Yalilhuist stable is apnurt'Ully puzzling tin- public a.s tn which is likely to be its Cup burse. For my own part I like lYiKitmin bt-st of the lot. Mr. F. Wutsun. alli'i- his Australian trip, is a strong supporter I rum an owner's point of view, of the bookmaker as ugt'.mM the lot, ills, dor. (Jlovelly, whom the public backed down to a £1 17h dividend m the Muideu iluck Unco ut the Hutt, is a stylish, though fractious youngster, and after playing up at the post, whipped round when the barrier was released and took no part in tho race. The colt showed pace, over half v niilo in a sprint at the Hutt, but his trainer was afraid he would not see the six furlongs out in the race. Therefore his connection did not support him to any extent . Any way, the public was quite satisfied to hack tlje colt, us ho came from the Porirua stable, and this time they burnt their fjngers. Mr. Harry lloyr, proprietor of the Ellerslie lota'listitor, went to Chrislchurch at the conclusion of the Wellington Meeting to inspect .Mr. H. Reynolds's new totalisator, with which he was favourably impressed. He left here on Wednesday afternoon for Auckland. Sceptre ran unplaced in the Grand Prix de Paris. She was not even in the first four. Kizil Kourgan won by a head from the French Derby winner Retz, who started favourite at 5 to 4. The winner's price was 100 to 7. Kizil Kourgan has already " won over £20,000 in stakes this season. , A couple of Carbine's progeny — Warsop and Sandbag — won a race each at the Lingfield Meeting in England recently, And later on Sandbag accounted for a weight-for-age race at Brighton. Randall, the rider of Sceptre in tho English Derby, got into trouble at the Lingfield Meeting. He was on the second favourite, Racine (at one time, it may be added, the first favourite in the market), but he seemed so disinclined to allow his mount to go up, and delayed his challenge so late, that the favourite, Ravensflight, was enabled to vrin by half a length. The Lingfield stewards examined Randall as to his riding, and, not being satisfied with his explanation, suspended him for the meeting. They also have reported his case to the stewards of the Jockey Club, and their decree "was that the evidence tendered was so conflicting that, while acquitting Randall of any intention to act dishonestly, they consider that the Lingfield stewards were justified in the action they took. The C.J.C. National double is a popular one among backers, and bookmakers aro busy writing wagers over the events. There are no decided favourites for either event, but Cunnongate, Uuku, and Haydn appear to be most in favour for the Steeplechase, and Tresham, Mars, Kahuwai, und Strathnairn for the Hurdle Race. Mr. Henrys has given The Guard the crushing impost of 13st 21b in the Steeplechase — one that has never been carriea to victory in tho race. Of course, The Guard's performances this season entitle him to a steadier, bub 13sb 21b appears like crushing out v good horse. I don'b care much for Moifaa (12st 81b), as he seems out of form, and Cavalierio (12st) appears to have a better cJuuaco in tho Hurdle Race. Gobo has 101b more than he carried to victory at the Hntt, and the extra half-mile at Riccartoa will ivroxa his chance. The ground at Riccarbon will also suit him better. Gmnongate (lift 81b) is not overburdened, vhile Evening Wonder (lOst 91b) is nicely honticappod. Haydn (ll)*t 91b), who bait been doinjf g»i<\ schooling work at Ellorslio, is fairittl by Aucklanders, and Huku (lOst 71b). us (he Riccarton Up for the erenA. Th* latter gives one the impression of ntldnje - good 'chaser. Warworn (lJDst 7Fb) is aw* likejy to start, and tho journey ii a wt far for Rufus (10kb 21b). Roller (lOst) has not. done much for some time, and Frost (lOst) seems right off. The Phantom (9st 131b) is a safe conveyance,* but the distance tni^ht find him out. I would prefer Tho Swimmer (9st 121b) to most of the candidates if I was satisfied about his staying powers. He has the paco all right, aud jumps beautifully. Lockade and Straybird (9st 101b) tiro a couple of good' old plodders, and Straybird may bo taking another hand in the decision of the race, Whangaroa (9st 91b) is a fine fencer, but has not been up long enough. The four I like best are Gobo, Cannongate, Huku, and The Swimmer. Cavalierio (12sb 91b) has nob been crushed out of the Hurdle Race. Thorpe landed the event with Record Roign carrying 12st 121b, and somo consider Cavalierio was as good as Record Reign over hurdles. Royal Conqueror (Ilßt 131b) is such an honest fellow thab he should nob be discarded, and ho comes on the scene when the others aro dying away. I like The Guard's chance better in the Hurdles than I do in tho Steeplechase. He has the same weighb (list 121b) as ho carried into second place behind Waiwera ab Wonganui, for which he meets Waiwera on 41b better terms. Waiwera's running ab the Hutt shows that The Guard must have a chance at Christ* church. Battleaxe (list 91b) might have been let off lighter considering thab he has had an unsuccessful trip to Australia, and was defeated in the V.R.C. -Hurdle Race. Fit and ■well he would of course have a good chance, but tho odds are now against him starting. Waiwera (list 41b), if ridden a better race than he was at the Hutb, should run well, but I don'b liko Haydn ab llsb 41b. Huku (llsb 2lb) has been dropped 41b for his Hutt performance, bub he then ran on bhe outside of his field all the way. The Hempie (lOst 91b) may have an outside chance, bub Dundas (lOst 81b) has been nicely handicapped for a performer of his ability on the flat. Stili, he is unreliable. Jumping, however, sometimes cures horses of this roguishness. Maro (lOsb 71b) is about in his right place, and Kahuwai ab lOsb 51b looks to have a good chance. Tresham (lOst) is the Auckland rip for the race, and he has been well backed in doubles with Cannongate. Most people who were present ab Ellerslie agree that he would have won tho National Hurdlos bub for falling. Stmthnairn( 9st 121b) is in splendid condition nt the. present time, and he ran well ub the end of the second day's Hurdle Race at the Hubt. Of the light weights, Kohunui (9st 81b) and Smithy (9st), in Duvies's stable, may have outside chances if they go on satisfactorily. With so many exflat racers engaged, the race is likely to be run at a very solid pace, and perhaps some of the genuine hurdlers will be outpaced. The quartet I have mosb respecb for are Cavalierio, Kahuwai, Dundas, and Tresham. In the Winter Cup, I like the chances of Ostiak (llsb 61b), Cora Linn (lOst 101b), Siege Gun (9sb 121b), nnd Durable (9st). Hod and Gu.n. [Contributions to this column, addressed "Gamebag," will be welcomed. They should be concise, and must be signed with the writer's full name and address, nob for publication, but as a guarantee of authenticity.] [By Gameuag.] Tha first net put down by the Wellington Society's curator in the Hutt river this leasou was swept nway by a heavy flood, and after that the net was placed in the Belmont stream, near the site of the old wool-scourihg works. Up to tho present about 120 ilah have run up, and no fewer than 85 oi those were males. In pnst seasons there has beon a denrth of ma!es. bub this year they have beon taken in exceptional numbeis. The net will be kept in the Belmont for a week or two longer, and there will be no more

snipping. The lust ono was juht a v/eek ago, wlit-n .\h. Avmhi gut bOOO goml e;,'gs. Only one big tish has been caught, and it weighed about 101b. The otheii have been good lish of model ate size. JiUige dideis for fry have been received limn all ovei the colony. The lepoit thai the [Society wan negotiating tin- the }iuicha.ie of the MusLertun PoiuL v, ,i») iipp.ueully based on enquiries made by the ( utineil in view of the expiiation of iho piesieul lease in two years' tuno. There uro about nine acres in the puipcity. The I'Vilding Acclimatisation Society intends le-slocking the Oroua river with trout, Iho stock of which wus depleted by the recent Hoods. Tho disunities among eyed ova and fry at the Masterton ponda has been surprisingly light. As was mentioned in this column last week tho harvest already amounts to over a million ova, and as stripping is not yet completed, a number of rainbows lcmamiug for this purpose, tho toLil at tJjo season's end should not be far otT a million and a half. Curator Ayson and his assistants have reason to be proud of their work. Just' under the bridge inside the gate is a female 12Vounder, that can be tickled and swung out by the tail. "Slippery Susan" is, however, too stalwart a customer to be held very long in so unladylike a position. Just fancy how a mun uho successfully tickled a 12-pounder in Home waters ■« ould gasp ! In Iho House on Wednesday the Hon. Major Sltnv.tid asA"ed the Government — (1) Whether, in view of the regulations made by the Uovernor-in-C6*uiicil, under dale September, 1892, whereby the acclimatisation societies in the southern districts of the colony were authorised to issue fishing licenses to adults on payment of a lee of £1, it is competent to yuch societies to reduce the license fee to 10a ; and (2) whether the Government will introduce an amending Act providing that the amount of the fines recovered for breaches of the fisheries regulations shall be paid over to the local acclimatisation societies? The Acting Premier, in replying, said :— 7(1) The regulations were made by Order-in-Couucil, and the, amount cannot be reduced by the Societies ; (2) It is proposed to amend the law in this direction." The large question that this first matter opens up and tho possibilities arising therefrom will be at once apparent." In my notes of last week on the pigeonshooting championship I omitteQ to mention the excellence of the general arrangement made by Mr. Yon Stunner, the Secretary, and the satisfactory refereeing of Mr. S. V. Burfidge. The visitors were loud in thoir praises of tho management. In tho annual report of tho Lands Department appears tho following reporr from the Wellington Accli»\ati>aHon oociety on the Game Jf'avm neserve, near Parap&rrumu: — "l?rmn the statement of receipt., and expenditure it will be seen that £88 15s 4d has been expended on the reserve for the year ending 31st March, 1902, the chief items of expenditure being fencing (£6B 15s out of Government vote of £70 13s), and salary of caretaker (£2O). The fencing work remaining to be done this year coutpnaes the completion of the boundary fences, for which a contract has already been lot. This will enclose the whole of the reserve with a substantial eight-wire fence. The deer liberated on the reserve continue to thrive and increase, there being now a iksrd of eighteen, -which are to be found >ei«tvhm« on t&* ironanve. irequentlv op th* grow toad** rtiautfngr tlUs ireserve, and often •» tU» tmttn vouric lauding up to roi""-«i trijt rtafcwiu. A ficw Californium qptui) fruns sittliuS donnu on the reserve, anfl oa\n air jmvo gnieasants have beon wen. Vtm& Balttar were not liberated on the reserve. The Bociety has not been able as yet to make any satisfactory arrangement for the breeding of gamo birds at this locality." "Wo have been enjoying a good season an regards game this year, says the Opotiki Times, "pigeons being very plentiful, in fact, we have never had them so plentiful. Pheasants also, despite accounts to the contrary, are numerous, and tho natives have also had great pig hunts lately." FoUowing in an interesting excerpt from the annual report of tho Marine Department : — "Shipments of salmon ova nave brojk^eceived from Canada and Great f Britain. The shipment from Canada consisted of 500,000 sockeye or bluejack ova, which were supplied without charge by the Canadian Fisheries Department. The ova were sent from Canada to San Francisco, in charge of one of the Canadian | Fisherx ofneors. At San Francisco they wore taken charge of by Mr. G. H. Lambson, an officer of the United States Fish Commission, who brought them to New Zealand. The shipment arrived in bad condition, owing to tho mode of packing not being suitable 'for long-distance carriage. Only 160,000 ova were good when unpacked, and there was a large percentago of deformed fish amongst those hatched out. The ova from Great Britain came in two shipments— one of 150,000 by the Gothic, and the other of 50,000 by the Paparoa. They yielded about 50 per cent, of good ova, out amongst the fish hatched out a considerable number were deformed. The salmon at present in the hatchery at Hakataramea are as follow— via., Quinnat (seventeen months old), 20,000; sockeye or blueback (six months old), 20,000; Atlantic (S. salar)— Gothic shipment 51,200, Paparoa 25,500. During the year there have been liberated in (he tributaries of the Waitaki River 23,600 yearling quinnat and 5000 sockeye fry, and in fcno streams flowing into Lake Ohau 91,200 sockeye fry. At the Hakataramea Ralmon-hatchery eight new rearing-ponds have been made, the race bringing the water for hatching purposes has been boxed from the springs to the hatching-shed, a high board fence has been erected round the ponds and buildings, a substantial wire fence has been erected round the reserve, a concrete floor has been put in the hatching-shed, and a tool-shed, workshop, cart-shed, and meat-house have been erected. Altogether, good progress has been made, and the Chief Inspector of Fisheries expresses himself wp)l satisfied with the salmonrearing experiments. Inquiries have been made in Great Britain and the United States as to the possibility of bringing tho spawn or live specimens of some of the best market fish of Europe and America to the colony, and the information obtained has been submitted to the Portobello Marine Fish Hatchery Board for its suggestions theroon." The Taranaki Acclimatisation Society has, during the past week, liberated two black swans on the Hokowhitu lagoon, recently declared a protected reserve. It is expected that white swans, English mallard, and paradise ducks will be liberated in the reserve at an early date. Mr. F. Deans (manager), reported at the last meeting of the Otago Acclimatisation Society that the stock of fish had all" spawned, and they were collecting the brown trout ova. The number of ova laid down at the hatcheries wa« as follows:—At Clinton: 14,000 brook trout, 167,000 Loch Leven trout, 75,700 Scotch burn trout, 93,000 brown trout, and 13,500 salmon; at Opoho : 16,000 brook trout. 27,300 Loch Leven trout, and 140,800 brown trout. The total up to date was 547,000. The brook .trout having been the first to spawn, their ova wns advanced, and 10,000 were to be shipped u» Flobart. Orders were also coming in for Loch Loven and rainbow tvout ova. Three bronze-wing pigeons nnd a brnco of pheasants were received from Hobart, nnd a brace of wekas nnd two rock phenssmts were to be sent to Ilobart in exchnnffe. The work of erecting the new hptchefy nt Clinton was nt present ot a standstill, Mr. M'Cn'Tnack using indiipoiad.

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SPORT AND PASTIME. The Turf., Evening Post, Volume LXIV, Issue 23, 26 July 1902, Supplement

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SPORT AND PASTIME. The Turf. Evening Post, Volume LXIV, Issue 23, 26 July 1902, Supplement

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