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Evening Post. SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1902.

THE FIRST UNIVERSITY TOURNAMENT. « Although the- primary purpose of a University is to provide ' instruction in .literature, science, philosophy, and the various higher branches of knowledge, such an institution has besides other and . hardly less important functions to fulfil. It should form a national centre of intellectual life, fostering original research and encouraging mental and moral progress. 1 It sliould also be a powerful social force, attracting the young by its care ; for everything that adds to the fullness and harmony of life, and preparing them by culture, in the widest sense of the term, intellectual, social-, and physical, for the work of life. Although the lec-ture-room, the laboratory, and the study must ever be the first considerations, the common-room, the debating club, the cricket field, and ,tke ,many convincing grounds of wit and athletics, are essential if the University is to be 'something more than that bete noir of the English public schoolboy, a "muzzing-shop." Side by side with professional or tutorial teaching the younger members of the University should be encouraged to indulge in » healthy rivalry in sport and games of skill, and in that interchange of ideas which sharpens the faculties, widens the sympathies, and is as truly educative as poring over books or carrying out scientific experiments. These various activities, not expressly provided for in the College or University syllabus of studies, are important factors in the creation, of what may be called a "University life," they are largely responsible for what is commonly known as "tone," for esprit de corps,, and "for the permanence of those valuable associations, formed during a College career. They find their highest expression in the life of a "resident" University, but much can be done towards developing them even in institutions where the corporate life in criT'Pon is 110$ so perfectly assured. Anj'thing which tends to encourage these activities in the comparatively modern U-niveraily Colleges of this new land is worthy of the most generous support. ,We are , glad to note that there is a growing inclination to pay more and more attention to this side of University life here in New Zealand. A marked sign of the progress already made is to be found in the Inter-University College Tournament to be held at Christchurch during the coming Jiaster holidays. It is not only that the tournament will

draw together for purposes of social intercourse and friendly competition students, and possibly professors also, from the widely separated Colleges affiliated to the University, but if, as we trust will be the case, the meetings become an annual .institution, the preparation for them must give a great impetus to the corporate life of each of the Colleges. The tournament, according to a draft programme which has been forwarded to us, includes inter-college sports, tennis matches, and debating contests, -with a dance on the Monday evening. There is also, we understand, to be a conference of delegates to arrange for next year's meeting. The idea originated with Canterbury College, which first mooted the suggestion hist year. In August last the same college brought it up agajn and issued invitations to its sister institutions in Wellington, Dunedin and Auckland. The response has been highly satisfactory. Auckland University College is expected to send about 18 representatives, Victoria College 25 or 30, and Otago also a strong team. Each, college is allowed three representatives in each of the championship events, which, include 100, 220, 440 and 880 yds, and one mile flat races, 120 yds over hurdles, a mile walking, a, long jump, a high jump, and putting the weight. There are also to be several other races open to all students. Among the aims, the promoters have set before themselves is the encouragement of amateur sport. There is to be no "pot-hunting;" the prizes and trophies are to- be bronze medals stamped, by the permission of the Chancellor, with the seal of the University. "Record-breakers" are, however, to receive gold medals. The battle of wits, or rather battles, are to be fought over tbe subjects of Trade Unionism and Imperial Federation, and these indicate that our young University debater* are alive to the problems of the day and take an intelligent interest in great political movements. Many of the orators of the House of Commons twpn their spurs at the Oxford and Cambridge Unions, and it may be that some of the speakers at Christchurch. will in time to come remember in the halls of Parliament the sham fight of this year's tournament. The ""University meeting has, we are informed, received generous sympathy and support from the College Professors and Governing Bodies, while His Excellency the Governor has consented to' become its patron. The Victoria College representatives have had the kindly aid of one of their Professors, who won his mile in the Oxford and Cambridge Inter-Varsity sports. Mindful of his own. enthusiasm in earlier days he has been out making the pace for the training. As the youngest of the affiliated institutions, and lacking as it does many advantages, such as a convenient training-track, defects which we hope time will supply, Victoria College has been somewhat handicapped, but the students trust in spite of all to give, good races. In conclusion, we can heartily congratulate th© whole body of students at the four centres upon the forward step they have taken, and join with them in wishing long life and success to these University contests.

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Bibliographic details

Evening Post. SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1902., Evening Post, Volume LXIII, Issue 64, 15 March 1902

Word Count
907

Evening Post. SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1902. Evening Post, Volume LXIII, Issue 64, 15 March 1902

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