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THE TURF.

[Bt Cbackshot.] ' RACING FIXTURES. November 28 and 30— Dunedin J.C. Summer. November 29 and 30— Feilding J.O. Spring. December 26, 28, and January 1 and 2— Auckland R.C. Summer. January 1 and 2 — Wairarapa R.C. Summer. FORM AT THE HTJTT. The heavy northerly gale which blew icross the course on Thursday made it uncomfortable for visitors, and must have retarded the speed of the competitors in those events "which were run. against the wind along the back stretch. The track was in first-rate order, and but for the high wind the times would have been fasjt. Things did not go too smoothly for backers, the only favourite which scored for them being lmperator in the Nursery Handicap. With the exception of Gorrick, the competitors in the November Handicap were all together at the home turn. There Aide-de-Camp showed out, and I thoughthe was going to win. But when Indian Shot tackled him he offered a very feeble resistance, and Tortulla's much - raced brother soon had his measure. But then Cornea put in one of her sensational final runs, and was galloping three strides to Irtdian Shot's one at the end. The judge gave his verdict as a dead heat between the pair, but from the press stand it was thought that Cornea had just failed to reach Indian Shot. The favourite, Fakir, ran well to the turn, but could ,not come on. Indian Shot has prove?! a very profitable investment for Mr. H. Franks, a Carterton boniface, who purchased him for £23 at the last Winter Meeting at the Hutt. Since then he has won two races, run a dead heat for first place, and finished second and third. His owner backed him on Thursday, and took close on £108 out df the machine. Cornea's owner thought she" had little chance of winning, and invested only three pounds on her in the machine. His instructions to scratch the mare miscarried, and he was made a winner of £45 in stake money against his wisln ' lmperator pleased every one by the slashing style in which he made up his Idst ground in the last few furlongs of the Nursery Handicap. It was a fine performance on the colt's part, and is likely to make Gipsy Grand a fashionable sire at the stud, lmperator should furnish into a fine three-year-old, and he might be found fighting out some of the finishes for next season's Derbies. Rajah, a Tull-brother to Indian Queen, showed a turn of speed, and it was only in the last few strides that lmperator got up to him. Drakensburg ran well for a tune, as also did Optimist. The latter is a fine colt by Apremont— Flatter. Hamua was galloping on well at the end, but Ringman and Ora ran badly. -Sir G. Clifford's representative Cannie Chiel closely pressed Palaver for favouritism in the Wellington Handicap, and he won the race in fine style. At the home turn Tortulla seemed to have everything, settled, but Cannie Chiel stuck to his work manfully and gradually overhauled the New Zealand Cup winner, whose big weight hampered her in the last bit, and she had to succumb to tEe Southern representative. It was a goou set to between the pair. Kahuwai finisMd next, and might "have "been closer frit for meeting' with interference. Battleaxe had rather too much groundTo make up from the half-mile post to have a. winning chance. He put in & fine run, but was beaten after passing the distance post. His effort was too much for him with 9st 41b on his back. Still, if Gallagher had ridden him right out he would have gained a place. Skobeloff was above himself, and the gallop would do him good. Perhaps Mbnschikofl's brother may win the Auckland Cup. The gay deceiver Dundas showed the way for a time, but faded away coming to the home turn. Robin Adair performed very well, and was in a good position at the home bend. Tukapa cried a go at the half-mile post, and then chased the field home. Kowhete was purchased by Mr. F. Bedford, of Napier, previous to the meeting with a view to winning the Maiden Hack Race, but she seemed to get tangled up in the field in the first part, and did not show up till the end, when she finished alongside Waipori for third place. Trade Wind, who won the race easily, is a leggy chestnut by Sou-Wester—Linim-ent, and the way in which he finished spoke well for his future career. Mooi again ran into second place, this being the second time she has filled that position in maiden events at the Hutt. Waipori is a fair sort of a gelding by Quilt — Waitiri. • When Sentry turned into the straight in the contest for the Shorts Handicap he was going so nicely in front tha^t it looked odds on him scoring, but his bad luck stuck to him, for Torowai, putting in a nice xun, oollared him thirty yards from the post and beat him home. Torowai gave promise last year, but ran disappointingly at the Hawkes Bay meetings. Ringlet kept with Sentry to the home turn, but then gave out. Ostiak shaped badly, and his 340 supporters were never flattered. The racing at Riccarton seems to have settled him. The first Hack Handicap resulted in a big surprise, th© Wanganui representative Reclaimer, who was neglected on, the machine, running away with it. He was always in front, and had no difficulty in remaining there. It is said that his party did not participate in the dividend (£l5 3s 6d) to any extent. Fleka had a bad cun, and was putting in fine work at the end. Laureate shaped better than he has done for some time, and gained third place. Prosser's other representative Hokio shaped well, as also did Shrapnel Shell, Benefactor, and Blackwing. The Welter Handicap turned out a real good thing for Calceolaria, who was looking very fit. She, came in by herself. With Calceolaria out of the race it would have been a fine contest amongst the other runners, four or five of^whom were almost abreast on passing the judge's box. When The Shannon slipped up on the inside on turning for home in the Flying Handicap it looked a good thing for him, as the- others had been carried right out to the outside rails. However, Muscovite got clear, and putting in a slashing run he had The Shannon in difficulties at the distance post, ultimately winning by a length and a half. Goldenmere and Stepina each ran well, but both lost ground at the home turn. • NOTES. People keep running down the Galopin horses (writes "Terlinga" in, the Australasian), and there is no defending HautviHer's exhibition in the Derby, but the Galopin horses keep winning. They were first and second in the Maribyrnongf Plate, and first and second in the Derby. They may be shifty — some of them undoubtedly are — but they "gallop a bit faster than their opponents, and pace is the chief thing required in a racehorse. For all that I would rather have a sound Trenton than any Haut Brion or Bill of Portland. The Trenton colts may be hard to train, but get them right and they am very good. As for his

mares, look at Quiver, Auraria, Lady Trenton, and Wakeful ! As I wrote before the Caulfield Cup, Wakeful over all distances is probably the best mare we have ever seen. Possibly she is not the equal of La Carabine and Quiver over long distances, but they would not be in it with her up to a mile and a quarter. And it is quite on the cards that Wakeful will stay as far as the others. I am only doubtful about her being as good as La Carabine over a journey, because Hymettus beat her in the Caulfield Cup, and we know she can lauglf at him over a mile and a quarter. „ The biggest winners in Melbourne over Revenue's success in the Cup were the owner and a bookmaker who followed the stable's lead. Several lucky backers, however, held such good wagers as £1000 to £20 and £1000 to £30. The Melbourne Cup winner, Revenue, was bred by the late Mr. W. R. Wilson at St. Albans, and was a good two-year-old. His stable companion, Scorn, was allowed to represent Mr. Wilson in the Alaribyrnong Plate, and' he won, but according to home trials Revenue could have done what Scorn did, and he won two nursery handicaps at the meeting. In the autumn Revenue just won the Sires' Produce Stakes, but he only ran because of Scorn taking cold and being unfit to start. This race seemed to upset Revenue, and he ran last in the Ascotvale Stakes, and was so cranky in the following spring that he was gelded. When Mr. Wilson died, Mr. Macdonald' bought Revenue for 725 guineas. Last year he was backed for the Cup, but on being brought to Flemington he went off his feed and. ran badly 1 in three races. This year Mr. Macdonald decided not to risk racing him before the Cup, and he did not leave Mordialloc until Cup morning, but the horse is" so well now that the probabilities are he would have taken no notice/ of a race, and it would have done him good. Mr. W. C. Whitney, the American owner of horses, who has just decided to give up racing on the English turf, writes that one of his reasons for doing so is the success that has attended his efforts to raise tne standard of racing in America, to which country he will now, presumably, confine his active connection with the turf. He adds that it reflects credit on "American trainers to be able to win classic races in England, and it was a matter of pride with him and other owners to be able to do so. In, conclusion he says that he never experienced any jealousy in England, and was always fairly treated. He has. now, given the amount of- the stake won in the Derby (£5670) by the colt Volodyovski, whose racing career he purchased from "Mr. Theobald," to the . stewards of the Jockey Club, to be devoted to some benevolent friend in connection with racing. Mr. /Whitney says he makes this gift in' appreciation of English courtesy, and also an expression of esteem for the memory of the late Lord William Beresford, whose name the stewards propose associating in some way in the disposal of the American sportsman's munificent present.

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Bibliographic details

THE TURF., Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 126, 23 November 1901, Supplement

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1,764

THE TURF. Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 126, 23 November 1901, Supplement

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