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THE TURF.

[By Cjiacksuot.] RACING FIXTURES. • September 4, s— Martun Jockey Club. September 18, 18 — Uangitikei Riicing Club. September 21, 25, 28 — Avondale Jockey Club. October 1, 2— Wnnjjanui Jockey Club. THE GRAND NATIONAL MEETING. Th« opening day of the Grand N.v tixMial Meeting at Riccarton vrts a groat Buccesn, the weather being fine, the holds respectable in numbers and quality, the sport good, and money plentiful, but on Thursday the weather was disagreeable, and the only contests that created interest were the National Hurdles and the Hat events. In three of the other events the results, judging by the dividends paid, were ioregono conclusions, and this appears to have been brought about by the heavier weighted division being rather too well cured for, and thus frightened out. Fancy four horses of tho calibre of Straybird, Opaku, Stanley, and Coastguard being the solo competitors at a £200 steeplechase at a .National Meeting, and Huku and Apremete left to fight out a £100 hurdle race. The C.J.C. has no occasion to regret tho adoption of the new system of paying out two dividends, which was originally suggested by Mr. James Ames, and eventually adopted by the Wellington club, of which ho has beon a steward for years past. The turnover on Tuesday was the princely sum of £16,395— a startling increase of £6396, for which tho new system of betting, was responsible. Then on Thursday the' returns were £1433 ahead of the corresponding day of last year. The Grand National Steeplechase resulted in a glorious win lor the PArua stable, which had the unique distinction of supplying the first and second horses in Gobo and The Guard. Neither of tho horses jumped any too well at tho Hutt, but the sounder going and the schooling in, the interval appear to have improved their jumping capabilities. The National country has the reputation of being the stiffest in the colony, but the high fences do not bring nearly so many horses down as "tricky" courses. One thing about the Riccarton course which is favourable to a good 'chaser is the solid ground at the approaches to the fences. Another good, feature is the easy angles at which the obstacles are situated. The performance of Tho Guard in getting where he did with list 21b was a big surprise. It was generally expected that his heavy burden would bring him to grief, but ho battled on and gave his stable mate a shaking up. Moifaa, unforunately, ran off. In several of his races, especially at Hastings, he has shown a tendency to ltaug out. It may be that he shirked his big weight (13st 61b) on Tuesday. Straybird ran a good honest race, and finished in tho samo place as he did last year— third. Ho is built on light lines, similar to those of The Guard, but for gameness tho pair would be hard to beat. Roller was a strong eleventhhour tip, but tho distance was too great for him. Right Metal finished where I expected — at tho tail end. Tho previous winners of the race aro as fol-

Haydn was one of the fitsi horses backed for the National Hurdles in doubles prior to the declaration of weights, The combination Moiiaa and Haydn was supported for all the money available, and the commission is supposed to have come from Haydn's connections. Tho double was in the first place rather damped by Moifaa getting a prohibitive weight in the Steeplechase, and then Haydn's running at the Hutt did not make his chanca look any too rosy at Riccarton. There was nn argument over the riding of Haydn on the tirst day of our meeting, but on tho second day he was- ridden out in the "straight, and readers of the Post will rememoer my remarks on the excellent run he put in when pursuit of Stockude and Hotu seemed hopeless. Ho is at home in soft going, and when I heard that the ground was soft at Riccarton I thought of his fino mn at the Hutt, blotted out of my mind his first day's display, and at the finish stood hhn to win. Now that Haydn has won tho National, I suppose his owner will be even more dissatisfied with his horse's form at the Hutt, especially as he had a change in riders. However, ho captured a good prize and secured a fino starting price — £7 11 — off tho machine and a limit "div," from the layers. Haydn, like many others of our successful horses, graduated from the hack ranks. His first race in open company was at the Wangamii May meeting, where he accountod for the hurdle double. He showed such sterling form that his owner was sorry that he had not paifl up for tho horse in the Auckland National Hurdles, in which he would certainly have held a respectable chance. Haydn is a neatly-built son of Foulshbt, who has left so many good jumpers behind him. He appeals to have been ridden a nice raco by \V. Fnhey, who also had the mount on Guard in tho Steeplechase. Long Tom, who acted as runner-up, is, as his name would imply, a very lengthy son of Artillery. He won a hurdle double at tho C.J.C. Easter Meeting, but had a poor lot to beat, and when he came up to Wellington a few weeks later Right Metal accounted for him on both days. Long Tom showed undoubted pace and proficiency as a jumper, but he was too new at tho game, and knocked himself out by his waywardness. Since then he has been well educated by F. Holmes, and the latter fancied Tom's chanco in preference to Marina's. The Hempie performed fairly well for a novice, and Norton's halfsister should win hurdle races in the future. The winners of the race have been as follows: —

Ostink, whose condition was mentioned previous to the meeting us being perfect, hud a runaway victory in tlio Winter Cup. This i.s ihe second timo Stepniak's son has led from start to finish in a milo nice at Riccurton, the last occasion being in the Maiden Plato at tho Spring Meeting, when he defeated Skobeloff. Tho stable connections had a decent win "over tho chestnut's success. Mars, purchased from the Hon. J. D. Ormond by Mr. "Teddy" O'Rorko, gained second placo in th» Cup, and returned the fins dmd«nd of £6 odd. NOTES. 'Mr. Douglas Gordon," tho popular local sportsman, has ben especially favoured by Dame Fortune during the last few weeks, during which time his own* horse Qobo has won the Wellington and C.J.C. Grand National Steeplechases, and Ostiak, in which Mr. Gordon holds a halfinterest, has been successful in the C.J.O. Winter Cup. The aggregate value of tho stakes won is £1255. This is a handsome sum to capture in three events, but it goes into the pockets of a good and straightforward sportsman, and no better illustration of it can be furnished than the case of Gobo. The fine-looking son of Natator — Qermaipe was originally purchased by J. H. Prosser for £150, mainly on account of tho deeas of his halfbrother, The Miser, who did fine service for tho Porirua trainer. Gobo showed such good track form that his ownertrainer fancied lie had something good in him. Ho won a few, hack races, but afterwards let his owner down badly, until at last Mr. Prosser tired of him, and asked Mr. Gordon to get a buyer for the horse at £100. Not desiring to see Germaine's son leave the stable, Mr. Gordon agreed to purchase Gobo at the sum named, with the view of putting him at hurdle-racing. After a little schooling he made his appearance at the Feilding Easter Meeting about sixteen months back in a hack hurdle race. R. Arnott had the mount on him, and landed him a winner. He, howevor, fenced somewhat slovenly, and cut his hind legs. About a month later on ho won the Otaki Hack Handicap, and on tho second day of the meeting was sent out with list 91 b in the Hack Hurdles. He was riuden a bad race and Riinlock, a full sister to Stockade, beat him in the run home. She was receiving 211b from Gobo. After running unsuccessfully in open races at the Wellington Winter Meeting the horse was placed in retirement for the winter at Porirua, but with the advent of spring was again placed in commission for hurdle events at the C.J.C. Spring Meeting. He accompanied Prosser's team to the meeting, but while training struck himself, aud had to be withdrawn from his engagements. He was brought buck to Porirua, and Mr. Gordon desired to sell him for what he had originally given for him— £lo0 — but no buyer was available. This has since proved a fortunate thing for Mr. Gprdon, for had a buyer come along for Gobo, tho local sportsman would not have had this year's winner of tho National and Wellington Stoep'echases. Mr. Gordon always had an idea that Gobo would make a good cross country horse, and when ho was put to the schooling fences at Porirua his owner's judgment was verified. He made his debut over cross-country in tho Maiden Steeplechase (it the Hutt last month, aud on tho strength of his performances at Porirua his paity thought it was a real good thing for him. But he fenced badly, and had to bo content with second honours to Nipapu. The schooling he received in that event undoubtedly did him good, for on tho second aay of the meeting when he competed in the big event ho showed improved style, although ho made a couple of faulty jumps. Many good judges passed Gobo's National chance by on account ot las Hutt displays, but the schooling in publio at the Hutt, together with private lessons in tho intorval, have improved his jumping remarkably, with the result that ho was huiled as the winner of tho Grand National Steeplcchaso of 1901. J. H. Prosstr *has established Ingulf as a thoroughly capable man in preparing racehorses for their engagements, But good as ho is in getting flat racers fit for the fray, I firmly believe that he i 3 even bettor^ with jumpers Ho ucar'y loves a jumper, and when ho sees his charges taking the fences it puts him in mind of tho old days when he used to ride in hurdle races himsoli. It is not often that one stablo supplies both first and second horses in an important event like the National,., and still rarer that it should fall to the same stable two years iv succession. For this feat Mr. - Prosser deserves great credit, and 1 add my congratulations to the many ho has already roceived. K. Arnott is the only horseman who has been aisociated with Gobo'a victories over fences. Amott is* a fearless and honest horseman, and takes a lot of shifting even if his mount shou'.d strike an obstaclo hard. His success on Gobo was tho first occasion ho has ridden n National winner, although it is thought by many, and Arnott himself is of the samo opinion, that had Dromedary not fallen over a policeman in the National won by Levanter, Arnott would have landed his mount a winner. Fortunately for all concerned thoro wcro no policeman in Gobo's way on Tuesday. Arnott has ridden tho winner of three important cross-country events this season — tho Napier Park, Wellington and National yteeplechußes. The news of tho breakdown of Social Post was a severo blow to local backers, as Ahua's son had been supported for tho National Steeplechase with every candidato in tho Hurdle Race. It appeal's that the horso was under suspicion for several days previous to his final breakdown. The local pencillers had a stormy timo over tho first day's business in connection with the .National Meeting. They opened well on tho first two races, Jester and Rex 11. being favourites with them for the Hunters' Hurdles, and The HemSic and Dartmoor for tho Maiden Hurles. But then.cnmo a series of knockouts, the next four winners being heavily backed— Ostiak, Gobo, X Jam, and Pipi —and then nothing else was supported for tho Bracelet but St. Michael. Tho layers, however, won a fair sum by the failures of Terror aud Benzoin in tho Winter Cup, Straybird and Roller in tho National, and Nipapu in the Enfield Steeple. Tho Auckland horses Hastings and Bona Rosa have been purchased by Mr. Donnellan, and will go into C. Stratford's hands at Riccarton. It is intended to ruco them in Canterbury in the spring, and send them to the West Coast at Christmas time. The Auckland Racing Club has granted tho Avondale Club permission to use Ellcrslio racecourse for its three days' Spring Meeting next month. A meeting of owners and trainers was Kcld at the Racecourse Hotel, Riccarton, On Friday night in connection with the disqualification % of R. Derrett for inconsistent riding. As an outcome of the meeting a letter was written to tho Dunedin Jockey Club asking for the rnv.*<ion of tho remainder of tho term of fication (twelve months). The letter was signed by most of tho resident owners ana trainers, and it is expected that when it is forwarded to the D.J.C. at the' end of the week, it wijl bear tho signature of most of the owners and trainers visiting Riccarton for tho Grand National Meeting. The annual meeting of the Wairarapa Racing Club will bo held at Groytown on 22nd August. In their reporl tho stewards again congratulate members on a most successful fear. Both the Summer

and Autumn Meetings of the club wore most satisfactory, notwithstanding tho unfavourable weather on the second day of tho latter meeting. The year started with an overdraft ot £la6o ]2s Id, and liabilities of £450 0s 3d. Tho overdraft had been reduced to £lis<4l 2s lOd, and tho liabilities to £291 5s 6d, being a reduction of £868 Is 2d for tho year. In addition to thin, improvements to the extent of £250 havo been effected on the course. Tho receipt* from nil sources have increased, and amouuted to £4531, as against £4118 thp previous year (including subscriptions to cup of £175), boing an incr«a«» of £588. The necessity for expenditure on the river bank has practically ceased, only £2 13s being spent during the year. The stewards regret to say that although the Racing Conference agreed to the club holding a third meeting (steeplechase) in tho year, no totalisator permit is available, unless some other meeting in the Wairarapa foregoes its permit, or the Government brings, in legislation to increase the number of permits. The stewards contemplate before next season erecting additional loose boxes and making another training track, as the increasing number of horses being trained at Tauhorenikau each year (last year numbering about 70) makes it most difficult for the custodian to keep the tracks in order, besides being an annoyance to horse owners and trainers. The estimated cost of these works is about JBiiOO. The balance of the debt, viz., £1500, should be extinguished within eighteen months, and this is to be earnestly desired, so that the club can materially increase its stakes. The stewards recommend that £2500 be placed at the disposal of the incoming stewards, for stakes for Summer and Easter Meetings, and an extra £1000 for a Steeplechase Meeting, if a permit should be available. Tho stewards also recommend to tho incoming stewards for consideration the paying out of dividends on first and second horses. The Messrs. Nathan will not, it transpires, suffer a total loss by the death of the stallion Fitzsimmons. On the 2nd instant (about 48 hours before he died) Fitzsimmons was examined by Mr. E. D. HaLstead, and, being pronounced free from diseaso or ailment, application was made to the agent of the International Horse Agency, in Auckland, for an insurance of £1000 on the horse's life for twelve months. The proposal was cabled to the head office in London on the same day. No intimation having beon received by the agent as to the acceptance of the risk, Mr. Alfred Nathan cabled to his brother, Mr. L. D. Nathan, who is at present in London, to enquire at the head office of the International Horse Agency as to whether the insurance had been accepted. A reply has, the New Zealand Herald understands, been received from Mr. L. D. Nathan to the effect that the company accepted the risk for the sum stated above. Battleaxe ran creditably in his two engagements, and may win a race before going home. Jabber must have gone off sinco the Hutt meeting, otherwise he should have been handy at tiie finish of tho Islington on Thursday with 51b less than he "walked in" with at the Hutt. On Ostiak's and Stepina's form at Riccarton Jubber ought to havo shown up better. Sundial, with C. Jenkins in the huddle, performed far better than he did at Wellington, where he was ono of tho first hoists beaten when his owner backed him on tho second day. That he ran second to Cora Linn in the August Handicap and then boat a perhaps stronger field in the Islington Mue, is proof tliat tho Natator— Sunshine horse has not by any moans lost his pace. He seems to run better for Jenkins than any other rider. Cor^ Linn's connections, it is understood, fancied* that Goidspur would beat them in tho six furlongs race, but the old fellow died away in the last bit, and the Foulphot mare settled 1 him at end. Sundial then came and beat Goldspur for second dividond. Mr. J. R. (Jorrigan, tho owner of Sundial, previously owned Cora Linn, and it was an instance of the irony of Fate to be beaten by ono of his cast-offs. Tauhei performed better in hor third engagement at the meeting — in the Islington, in which she gained second dividend. Terror was supposed to be a "hummer," but his Cup running was a long way below expectations. Still, he may have had bad luck. Huku, by Vanguard — Spray, seems a promising hurdler, and it is a pity ho was not left in the National Hurdles. Ho won both his races in good style, and is worth watching. A great misfortune overtook Ingliston in the Balaclava Stakes, the horso, by somo means or other not explicable, breaking his off shoulder. A friendly bullet , and exit the Caulfieid Cup winner. Ingliston had grown into a fine horse, and the accident, coming directiv in tho wake of Lowland Chief's defeat in tho Hurile Race, was a cruel piece of ill luck for Mr. Leek, who had refused '800 guineas for hjm a day or two before. Sir Rupert Clarke is at the head of tho poll of winning owners in Australia, tho young baronets winnings amounting to no le§s a sum than £8,552. Sir Rupert generously admits that he owes nis position mainly to tiie care and skill of his trniner, James Scobie. The tribute is well merited. The Ballarat trainer had a remarkable season, and although he Us lost the services of Clean Sweep, there are indications that he will be equally successful this season. Mr. F. T. Forrest, another patron of Scobie's stable, is second on tho list with £5908 ; Mr. C. L. JMacdonald is third with £5679. Thanks to Ibex and Fulminate Mr. W. H. Mate was tho greatest winner in New South Wales, and Mr. P. Bolger's theque~ £3711— shows that there is a good deal of money to be won in West Australia. But it must not be *ost sight of that he won the largest number of races, viz., 34£. Messrs. Duncan and Abbott's Australian winnings with Advance were £1324. For the second season in succession .Lochiel is at the head of tho list of successful sires, 40 of his progeny having won no fewer than 120 races wqrth £12,668 J. Lochiel gets gallopers from nil sorts of mares— the real test of merit in a stallion. Gozo again makes a good show with £10,892£, and Trenton and Bill of Portland are credited with £9915 and £8177^ .respectively, yM. Jean de Reszkc, the famous tenor singer, who is a very successful breeder and owner of racehorses in Russia and Poland, lias just .established a "record," for at Warsaw he ran, in the course of 13 days, 14 horses in 40 races, winning 30, and being placed in all but two of the others. All tao horses were ridden by "Tod" Sloan's brother, Cash Sloan, who won 19 races off the reel. "Tod" Sloan, the American jockey, has decided to follow his profession in France, having taken the house and stabling at Maisons-Laffite, formerly in the occupation of M. Max Lebaudy, and has registered his racing colours with .lie Steeplechase Society as "yellow jacket, blue sleeves, and black cap," He has given six hores to his compatriot, E. Durnell, to piepare for the "illegitimate" business. A fair amount of business has been transacted in Sydney on the Epsom Handicap. Among the wagers laid were 1000 to 40 Beauclerc, 100 to 50 Aurous, 1000 to 40 Cretonne. Prices on offer were 100 to 7 each against Sequence or Kenley, 100 to 5 each against Abington, Aurous, or Warrior 11., 100 to 4 each against Ferryman, Undaunted, or Leap Frog. The chief event of the day at the Birmingham Meeting last month, the Warwickshire Plate, a handicap of £200, one milo and a half, was won by a son of Carbine, out of Sintfield, named Cara-

bine. Tho colt won a good race at Thirsk after being left at the post, and he must be a useful animal. In the present raco Carabine's tnsk was an easy one, as the field only numbered four, and the colt, starting first favourite, won by three lengths. ' The Hurst Park Foal Plate, of £1200, for two-year-olds, five furlongs, stopped short at half a dozen, tho prisonso of Mr Siev^r 1 * Lavengro frightening away most of tho opposition, despite hi* penalties earned tor previous victories. Oddi of 3 \o 1 ware very freely laid on Mr. Siev•r'» colt, and he won as expected in a canter from the Duke of Devonshire's Roßihire and Mr. J. B. Wood's Joaquina. Time, linin 1 2-ssec. Lavengro is a bay colt by Ladas— Avilion, bred by Lord Rosebery, and he was purchased by Mr. Sievier at the Newmarket sales last September for 700 guineas. The colt has now won all the three events he has run for, and he is probably the third best two-year-old in England, being only inferior to his two stable companions, Duke of Westminster and Sceptic, though even 'this is by no means certain. Lavengro is not engaged in next year's Derby, but he has an engagement for the Leger. Probably no owner has ever possessed three such two-year-olds in one season as Mr. Sievier's trio. Thus an English paper— Mr. Sievier is said to have his troubles with the ring, but he appears to bear them lightly, as well he might with the three best two-year-olds in the country, for, were he to sell, Sceptre, Lavengro, »nd Duke of Westminster would realise what to many would be a fortune. Wealthy men- aro desirous to purchase, and £40,000 could be obtained for the three at this moment. Mr. Sievier was ngain triumphant at the first day of the Newmarket July Meeting. In the July Stakes, of £1600, for two-year-olds, T.Y.C. (five furlongs and 142 yards), the presence of one of his wonderful youngsters quite spoiled the interest of the race. This time it was Sceptre, the beautiful filly by Persimmon — Ornament, who cost 10,000 guineas as a yearling, and who had previously scored this season in her only outing, the Woodcote Stakes at Epsom. Nothing was backed except Sceptre, and even here the odds asked for were quite prohibitive, and for some time little business was done. Eventually, however, a bet .of £1000 to £100 was laid in one hand on Mr. Sievier's filly, and at this price she started — 10 to 1 on. Sceptre made the whole of the running, and won in a common canter from Mr. J. Musker's colt by Melton — Irena, and Lord Rosebery's Cheviot. Time, lmin 14 2-ssec. Sceptre is engaged next season in the Two Thousand and One Thousand Guineas, the Derby, Oaks, and Leger, besides numerous other important races. She will probably, if all goes well, be next seen out* at Goodwood, where she is entered in the Chesterfield Stakes and Richmond Stakes. Four of the remaining events were won by American owners — a daily occurrence now — Mr. Whitney winning two, Mr. F. Gardner one, ; and Mr. C'orrigan one, American jockeys being, of course, up on each occasion. When Epsom Lad defeated Diamond Jubilee in the Princess of Wales's Stakes, the King's horse was not himself, being short of work on account of a slight accident. His trainer was in consequence by no means hopsful of success. A local publican backed the National double— Gobo and Haydn— to win £150. . Several local backers had "legs-in" with doubles, The Needle being coupled for most money. For some reason Brigadier's son was not started. Ho has been favourite since the weights appeared, but as the day drew near he received loss support, owing to his high jumping in schooling work. *Nipapu wrenched one of her fetlocks when she fell in the Enfield Steeplechase. The race was at her mercy when she came to grief at tho second to last fence, and had he stood up no Pipi would have won. The local punters who backed the Natator gelding were lucky to get a dividend. The' Aura filly Aurous, the winner of the Caulfiold Futurity Stakes, was a strong order for the Moondah Plate at the first day of tho Caulfieid National Meeting. She had a good start, and was well up before reaching the turn, then she melted away, and was seen no more. The winner turned up in a rank outsider — May, a four-year-old mare by Harmonist — Piccaninny, who carried Yst 41b. Santoi, 6st 131b, was second, and Andorra, 6st 12st, third. v Repeater, the winner* of the Caulfleld Hurdle Race, is by Mana, a son of Musket, from L'Orient. Repeater was bought as a two-year-old for £150. Shoddy's three-year-old half-sister Cretonne, by Bill of Portland— Chintz, was backed down to 4 to 1 for the Balaclava Stakes at Caulfleld. The race attracted a immature Melbourne Cup field. At 9st 2lb Record Reign seemed to have a good chance, taking his New Zealand form into account, and as he was said to have improved ho was well befriended down to 9 to 2, but ho shaped indifferently. Cretonno had v tho race won at the turn, and passed the post cantering. She is only a little thing, and is regarded as a wonderful bit of stuff. The filly will go to Sydney for the Epsom Handicapweight 6st 121b. She ran the Balaclava Mile in lmin 45£ sec. Wairiri was second and Hymettus third. One of the many charms of Sir John Stainer was his appreciation of the humorous. Peoplo not knowing ono tune from another wouid go into affected raptures fteforo him over his voluntaries and beautifully wrought out impromptus. This tickled his whimsical fancy, and he determined to put their real ignorance to the test, only letting one musical "pal"' into the secret. It was evening iv Magdalen • Chapel. The fullyattended service was over ; setting sunbeams poured mellowly through sepiatinted windows. Portly dons and silken-clad matrons slowly filed out of the exquisite and poetical building. Stainer turned his intelligent face,, lit up by a sly smile, to the friend by his side in the organ loft. He drew out fresh stops, placed his flexible hands on tho bass keys? and then there rose with a gush of melody in solemn fuguelike movements, the deep strains of the immortal "Tommy Dodd." They gathered, rolled sweepingly round the vaulted roof, and died in a muffled silence. As the great dignitary present ponderously ■^stepped out into the open air he murmured placidly — "What a grandly solemn fugue ; one from the inspired works of Bach I I recognised it at once. — Vanity Fair." During the^ hearing <of a police court caso a lawyer was examining the prosecutor, , who charged the defendant with assault and battery. Lawyer — "Where did defendant strike you?" Witness — "He struck me on the bridge " Lawyer, sharply interrupting — "On the bridge You said just now that he struck you on the balcony." Witness — "So he did, sir. I'm telling you no lie." Lawyer^ — "Did he strike you more than once?" Witness — "Only once, sir, and I was satisfied with that." Lawyer — "How, then, could he strike you on the bridge and on the balcony at the same time, and with one blow?" Witness — "He did it, aayirt how, sir." Magistrate, interrupting-^ "On what balcony?" Witness— "The balcony of the hotel, your Worship." Magistrate — "But on what bridge?" Witness — "The bridge of my nose, sir. Had the gentleman waited, I'd ha' told him myaelf."

Yr. Winner. Woigiit. flfc lb 1890 — Ixion ... 10 2 1891 — Conrnnto ... 10 0 1802 — Kulnino ... 11 5 1898 — Liliorator .., 10 10 1804 — Liberator ... 11 6 1895 — Don'd M'Kinnon 10 8 189G '— Dummy ... 912 1897 — Umßlopagaaa ... 9 5 1898 — Sonial Pest ... 10 13 1899 — Leflanoo ... 11 0 1900-BeoordEoign ... 12 12 1901 — H»ydn ... 11 0 Tioio. ni.s. 4 5 2-5 3 58 4 0 8 55 4 5} 4 5J s an 3 53 2 5 3 58 8 5G 1-5 3 51 3-5 8 65 4-5'

ows : — 187 C ... 1877 ... 1878 . 1879 .. 1880 . [681 ... 1882 ... LBB3 ... 1884 ... mr> ... 188U ... LBB7 ... 1888 ... 1889 ' ... LSUO ... 1801 ... 1892 ... 1893 ... 161)4 ... WHS ... IByi> ... 1807 ... 1808 ... 1800 ... 19U0 ... 1001 ... "YVinnor. Weight. Jockey. at. lb. Eovftlty 10 0 Mr. Mnrtelli Fakir 10 C S. Osburno Moupctrup 11 4 1\ M'lCoy Agent 12 0 \V. Haukini A gout 12 7 11. Luiin C'iaronco 12 2 F. Uoilko Kuterfolto 10 0 W. Clifford KoHoiusLo 10 £ T. S'heeimn Airent I' 2 C T. I.yford Bloody Jl 0 C. ilobbv Cauard 12 10 H. Limn Fb-a-Uailagb 11 13 T. Lyford iM(iiii;aoliuno 11 2 liiokcy Cliomist 12 7 Kllingbam J;addy Lonffloffs 0 7 T. Lvfovd Fruomun 0 12 W. CUrko Abua 11 » AY. Clavko Waterbury 10 8 G. Hojio Nortou 12 0 W. Oliuko Mutiny 11 5 G. Hupo Mutiny 12 4 Q. ilopu liOVivntcr 12 0' J. liao Dummy 10 IS P. Jobnston Blaokben-y 10 G J. Kedmond Tbe Uutud 10 0 W. tiaylos Gobo 10 9 11. Arnott

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THE TURF., Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 42, 17 August 1901, Supplement

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5,108

THE TURF. Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 42, 17 August 1901, Supplement

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