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THE TURF.

■ * • ■■ [By Cbacishot.]

RAGING FIXTURES. July 17 and *o— -Wellington R.O. Winter. August 13, 15, and 17— 0.J.0. Grand National Meeting THE W.R.O. STEEPLECHASE " MEETING. ' Xhe acceptances and entries received on Wednesday last for the iirsb day of the local club 8 Winter Meeting exceeded all anticipations, and there are excellent prospects for a most successful gathering at tna Mutt next week. Wednesday, the opening day, is a Government holiday, v being Arbor Day, and this fact should help to «well the attendance. The course i.s at tho time of writing in good order, and should th« rain hold oft' the going will be first-rate. Tho Course Committee did the right •liing ia .shifting tho post-nnd-rail fenuo ;o the back of the course, whore the ground it firmer, but thoro appeared no )ocessity to raise tho height of the sod vail and the brush at the water-jump. Ik* Hutt steecplcchase course has in the )ast had an unenviable notoriety for ipills, and this prompted the stewards i couple of seasons back to form a new course and also to reduce the size of the obstacles. Even under the new order of things there have been many mishaps in negotiating the country. Two years 1 back, ' when Morag won tho Wellington Steeplechase, only five horses finished out oi ten starters ; and last y^ear four horses ciuuo to grief, while in tlio Hack - and Hunter*' Steeplechase on both days Mcnaderva was the only competitor that did not make a mistake. In those two events horses wore falling over ltko nineinns. Tho general public, and especially members of the fair sex, who patronise (he Hntt meetings freely, do not go out to witness a number of accidents, but like to see the horses give a good display of jumping, oven if tho obstacles ate of a light order. I do not think that the stewards were justified, after ptvst experiences at the Hutt, in making the sod wall higher, and in connection with raising the brush fenco at tho watorjump I am informed that the horses will aot be able, when approaching tho obstacle, to see the water on tho other side. The result will probably bo that they will be deceived when taking off, and eventually land in the wator. The Maiden 1 Steeplechase does not as a rule fill up well, and possibly this is due to the heavy weights to be carried. The Porirua stable has two representatives engaged — Qobo and Ngatahuia. The latter is a full brother to Toreki, who won hurdle races for Mr. Macdonald, but who turned when put at steepleohasing. Ho is a fine Wig horse, and ought to make a good juniper. Hutana, J. Cress's gelding, 'is a likely sort, and he may prove the winner. Eighteen paid up for the Steward's Handicap, a seven-furlong race. Jabber, at 12st 21b, will run well, especially at the Hutt. Ostiak, lOst 121b, ' has' a good chance, and I also like Sylvia Park (lOst 71b). Amongst the light- weights I care most for Smithy (9st). There are 22 entries for the Maiden Hack Race, run over six furlongs. Cobra won places at Otaki and Napier Park, and sue may have a chance at the Hutt. W. Keith's pair, Forward Guard and Employer, are supposed to bo dangerous, and the two-year-olds Snooze and Benefactor should run well. Snooze is one of the Hon. J. D. Ormond's lot, and ran second to Destroyer in a flye-furlong ' race at Hastings last March, afterwards finishing third to Assayer and Queen's Signal in a six-furlong race at Waipukurau. There was a weeding-out in the Winter Hurdles, the better class of horses declining their engagements. On' Wanganui form Haydn (list 51b) will go near winning. Hotu (lOst 71b) is nicely handicapped, and should have a good chance. Hairtrigger (lOst 51b) showed good form at EUerslie, but ran badly at the Park This, however, is accounted for by the horse having a bad trip down to Napier. The ex-hacks Grey Ribbon (lOst) and Dormant (9sr) should not be passed 'over, for they both ran creditably at Otaki. Crusoe runs well at the Hutt, and with list 71b he must be held in respect for the Parliamentary Handicap. Rabin looks to have a chance at lOst 31b, but the best-handicapped candidate is Tigress (9st 101b). Captain Russell's more struck fprm at the Pork last week, and she seeaa to have a rosy chance in Wednesday's race. These is a poor lot in the Hack end Hunters' Steeple. Perhaps Lochade may win, but if the disappointing Leah takes the country all right her pace should see her home first. • Twenty-four accepted for the Haok Handicap, and the system of paying out on first and second horses should work ■well in this event. -Anything might win, btft the trio I like best are Cornea (lOst 51b), Rttma (9st 61b), and Punawai (9st The Wellington Steeplechase is to be decided on Saturday. The Guard, 12st 31b, hurt himself at Porirua this week, but may be well enough to run by Saturday. He certainly appears to have a Teally good chance of capturing the prise. Straybird is well in at lOst 51b. He ran several good races this time last year, but has not t>een of much uso lately. At the Oinborne Meeting he accounted; for the Steeplechase, but ho had a poor lot to beat. Hinau, 9st 111b, comes from Bulls, where there are plenty of facilities to find out ais crosscountry abilities, and he may be worth while keeping in mind. Cairo, 9at 401b, should run creditably. He has Seen over the Hutt course successfully before. TH.E NEW TOTALISATOR DIVIDEND SYSTEM. The unanimous decision of the stewards of the Wellington Racing Club to Vidopt the system of paying out totali•ator dividends on first and second horses wHI be welcomed with favour by the general pabHq, who will be quite satisfied to accept a reduced dividend on the first horse so long as they have a doable chance of winning. Some horseowners may not at first favour the new idea, but it is considered that after they have seen the system working they will be won over to it. The fine fields which are likely to go to the post at tho meeting next week will give the public a good opportunity of trying the system, which has already worked well in its initial trial in this colony, and is also a great success in South Africa. Now that there will be a double lot of odd money left after working out the two dividends it certainly behoves the local club to pay out sixpences. The clnb will receive quite enough in increased totalisator revenue through the advent of the new system without retaining the odd moneys up to a shilling. Provision should be made at the totalisator-house for extra pay-out windows — windows for dividends on first horses and also for second horses. Clerks should also be stationed at the pay-out windows in the intervals between the races, so that the publio may obtain their dividends at Whatever time they desire, instead of having to ccowd in the entrances immediately on the conclusion -of a race. It is to be hoped that all arrangements for the carrying out of the system will be in apple-pie order, so that everything will work smoothly, as the system is practically on its trial. If it is successful next wees the chances are that II will b» introduced at othor meeting*

in the colony. Delegates to the Racing [ and Trotting Oonferoucos will be iv attendanoe from the various districts in tho • colony, and should they be favourably [ improssed with the idea they will doubtless recommend their clubs to introduce it. The proposal has oaused consternation amongst tho local penoillers, and the preminent men are not hkely to allow their books to be governed by tho startingprice on the totalisator. It is rumoured that they intend to pay out only on the first horse, but no definite course of action has been deoided on. It is under- | stood that a meeting of bookmakers will be hold next week to decide on what course they will pursue. Tho introduol tion of the system is almost certain to put a check to tho laying of "tot*" adds. NOTES. Mr. Harold Russell informs tho Napier correspondent of tha Keieieo thut Coeur do Liuu will retire from tho racing path for a time ut least, and tho ga-iiuit w lutefated chestnut will, during the conuug season, rule as sultan of tho harem at Sherendon. Strange to say, thu lionhearted one now does not seem to show any signs «f lameness, and it is only a little over a week since he looked v hopeless cripple as he camo back to tho paddock oiler competing in the Hurdle Kuce at Hastings. J. Mahor, who has leased Mju;tindale Lodge at Hastings from Percy )a Martin, will train tiiose of Mr. S. H. Goilan's horses which are to ue raced in this colony. A Gisborne resident has purchased The Miner from Mr. M. Simpson, of Hawkes Buy. Tho Guard cut his stifles while being schooled the other morniug at Porirua, bub iio may be able to start in the Wellington Steupleuhasbt A. Robertson, tho well-known trainor, is on a visit to Wellington, and will bo present at the Hutt Mooting next \\«.ck. Will-o'-tho-Wisp was tho first New Zealand Cup candidate bucked for money. Last weelc a commission was executed in his favour for tho big Spring ovoat in the various centres, and about £5000 wad obtained about tho Mystical — Ripple geldding ut 100 to 5. The West Coast ropresentutive has certainly not shown form in the past that would, warrant him having a winning chance in a fuco like tho Now Zealand Cup. lla is, however, v I genuine stayer, but at tho same time I fancy he will be rather outclassed. James M'Taggart has accopted an engagement as head man for tho Porirua stable, and he is selling his place at Palmorston North preparatory to shifting permanently to Porirua. M'Taggart was left ip charge of the Porirua stable while Prosscr was away in Australia with Advance and Boreas, and gave satisfaction. In arranging programmes (says the Australasian) tho V.R.C. decided to try the experiment of fixing a maximum weight of 12st 71b in the August ' Hurdle Race and Steeplechase. The maximum beyond which Mr. Dakin may go is 31b less than the handicappor has given Bethnnl in the Grand .National Steeplechase. With the dislaDce of the August race shorter by half a mile, and the ground likely to be better going than in July, it goes without saying that a majority of the committee consider Mr. Dakin has gone too high with both Record Reign and Bothnal in the Nationals. We do not bolicve in good horses being crushed out, but this 12st 71b maximum simply bars the rank and filo. With Record Reign and Bethnal all right very few of the light weights will have much show against them in the^ Nationals, and in August, over shorter courses, it will bo impossible to give the ordinary jumper a chance of beating them with a 12st 71b maximum. If the V.X.C. must have a maximum weight let them decide what it is to be after seeing tho entries. . . If the V.R.O. want to experiment with a maximum let thorn do away with tho minimum weight. Then the handicappor may be able to mako a handicap. With 3st 71b between the best and tlio worst he cannot do it if thero happens to be a really good horse in the field, and if there is not a good one engaged thero is no call for a maximum, uucuuse tho handicapper would not go beyond 12st. If it is intended that the £450 given to the {'umping races in August is to be for the lenefit of the best horses only, why have the races handicaps? make them weight-for-age events at once. The V.R.C. committee keep voting more money to jumping - races. Owners of huidleracers "and fitefiDleobasers seem to be getting every consideration. Wo should <*rfo to nee the committee doing something for the crosscom^ry jockey, as well as the owner, but we hear no talk of anything being done in this direction. Considering the scarcity of their opportunities, the amount of schooling they have .to do gratis, and the risks they run, we think cross-country riders are the Worst paid of any class of men who get their living out of racing. The Hotchkiss — Frailty horse Lancaster is in the sale list for stud purposes. The Caulfiold jockey J. Stevenson, who won the Melbourne Cup on Auraria, won -his first race in England, at the Birmingham June meeting, in the colours of Mr. T. G. Muir. T. Payten, of Rondwick, trains no fewer than eight of the horses entered for the Melbourne Cup — namely, San Fran, Hoop Iron, Fighting Mac, Gay Gordon, Hautboy, Grasspan, Lord Rudolph, and Klimbo. The last-named has only run three or four times, and is a three-year-old gelding, by Gozo from The Orphan, by Goldsbrough. "Javelin," in tho Melbourne Leader, selects La Carabine to win the Melbourne Cup, and Fighting Mac the Caulfield Cup. He considers that Advance has been severely treated in the Melbourne Cup, but thinks Seahorse and Record Reign hold respectable chances. The mammoth Btakes run for annually on the English turf, as a 1 rule, fall to the star performers of the racing track, but in .ftho result of tho Princess of Wales's Stakes at Newmarket thero is another tale to relate, and the victory of Epsom Lad over the Derby and St. 1 Legcr winner Diamond Jubilco has in it all the elements of a big surprise. Epsom Lad, who has the distinction of annexing the 10,000 soys stakes, had not (says a contemporary), so fur as we are aware, a winning performance to his I credit. Last season he carried the colours of his breeder, Lord Rosebery, on five occasions, but only once succeeded in gaining a situation, and that was in a very minor class of race. When Lord Rosebery sont his horses up for sale in October last, Epsom Lad was included in the list. Though the form of the son of Ladtui was bad, there was evidontly some ono at the ringside that considered ho could bo made a racehorse, as the bidding for his possession was carried to 1050 guineas, ut which price he was knocked down to a Mr. Kincold. A victory in a 10,000 soys race certainly makes Epsom Lad out to be a rare - bargain of tho sale-ring. Epsom Lad was a maiden at tho time he was saddled up to. contest the Prinoess of Wales's Stakes, and his owner would be in a position to claim a 71b allowance, which would give the son of Ladas the handy burden of Bst 31b. Diamond Jubilee, on tho other hand, by reason of his Derby and St. Leger victories, had a 141b penalty, which would mean !that the son of St. Simon would be required to* carry the steadier of 9st 101b. Last season Diamond Jubilee carried the colours of the Prince of Wales, but shortly after His Majesty'-* acoenion to the Throne the Derby win*

uei' was transferred to the Duke of Devonshire, and it was iii the colours of the Duke that Diamand Jubilee mat his defeat at Newniarkot. Au in tare* ting incident in couneotion vrith the Princess of Wales's Stakos is that Diamond Jubilee has filled second place tw» years in sucoassion, ao that the sou ef St. Simon has eaoouatered rathar hard luck. The erst-New Zealander James Hiokey is nut wanting for patiouaga is tho Old country, tho liorsos owned by colonial uporUuien being especially strong in his stable. Advices to hand state that Mr. W. T. Jones is the latest addition to Hickey's list of patrons. Mr. Jones will bo best romembored by colonials as the owner of Bravo when the son of Grand Flaneur won the Melbourne Cup of 1889. At the Newmarket Second Spring Meeting a horse called Guttersnipe won tho Apprentices' Handicap Plate, but was disqualified for not currying a penalty which he had incurred, and the race awarded to tho Carbine colt Sandbag, who started at 10 to 1. Two jockeys were found guilty of foul riding m the Mount Gurabier Cup, at the Mount Gambier (id. A.) races, and wore suspended for twelve months. The stewards were requested before tho event started to watch it closely, and accordingly two of them were stationed at ditl'erent parts of the course, one being on the hill, where the horses went out of sight, where the starter was also located. Immediately alter tho race they reported what they had witnessed, with the result that the two riders were disqualified. In view of the reports about foul riding at previous meetings at the Hutt, a couple of stewurds should be placed at the turn near the Hutt, and also at the home turn, and perbups some of tho offendors may bo caught redhanded. The profit and loss statement of tho Wanganui Jockey Club for the year shows a net profit for tho year of 18s Id. In addition to increasing stakes for the year by £1345 and spending £562 in permanent improvement a and icpuirs, the club has still £2500 bearing interest and liquid assets amounting to £200 odd. THE ENGLISH DERBY AND OAKS. - (From Our London Correspondent.) LONDON, Bth Juno. America hna carried off both the great Epsom ruces this year. On Wednesday last Mr. W. C. Whitney's b o Volodyvoski not only won th£ Derby, but broke all records as to time, ' covering the mile and a half in 2mm 40.8 sec, tlie quickest time ia which tho raco has ever been run. Thus, ulthough the 25 horses that competed were considered to be on the whole below the standard Darby "form," it is conclusively proved that the American horse won by dint of Bheer swiftness, seeing that such fast time has never before been made over that historio course. - It would have bsau done in eveu quicker time had tho jockey, Keiff, been able to keep hu horse straight. But this proved impracticable, and oue bad swerve cost Volodyvoski several lengths of his win, so that in the end he only beat the Duko of Portland' coil William 111. by three quarters of a length, Mr. Douglas Buird's Verouoso being third. Mr. Whitney, tho owner of Volodyvoski, was not able to get away from New York in time to see his colt win. One who was present at the race remarks :— " As a rule the victory of the favourite ' excites great enthusiasm, but the return of Volodyovski to the weighing enclosure did not give rise to muoh cheering, and things .would have been very different if Lord William Boresford, who had leased the colt irom Lady Moux, his breeder, had lived to see him win. But after Lord William's death some difficulty arose as to the validity of the lease, and in the end he was' handed back to hii breeder, who leased him afresh to Mr. Whitney, an American, who had only recently started a racing stable in England. ** Mr. Whitney left him -in charge of Huggins, the ablo Americau trainer, who had had charge of Lord William's horses, and who could be trusted to do more than any one else with a colt like Volodyovski, whom he had had sines his yearling days." Yesterday the Oaks "followed the Derby across the Atlantic" The 123 rd Oaks ruu at Epsom was won by a filly bred in America, owned by an American, and ridden by an American. Further, the riders of the second and third both were Americans. The only participation England can claim is that the animal was trained by an Engiisman. Mr. Foxhall Eeene's filly Cap and Bells 11. come in the winner in a canter by six lengths, Lord Ellesmere's Sabrinetta being second and Mr. R. Croker's Minnie Doe third. The crowd at both tho great races is said to have constituted a record in itself, the weather being absolutely perfect.

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THE TURF., Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 12, 13 July 1901, Supplement

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THE TURF. Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 12, 13 July 1901, Supplement

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