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THE TURF. [By; Crackshot.]

ffiXTURES. June 8, 10, 1 and 13— North New Zealand. . Grand National Meeting. Julyvl^and^u— Wellington R.C. Winter. THE OTAKI MEETING. When-the annual May gathering of our native cousins commenced on Friday the going was holding, but after two events Had been got off iho course was visited by a terrific hailstorm', and rain fell at intervals. This made the courso worse thSn ever, and in some of the latter events the horses were fotlock-deep in mud, and the riders got a liberal supply of mud in their faces. On tho second day tho sun dried the ground a good deal, although it was nevertheless '"sticky." The sport on the first day was poor, and with the bleak, cold weather, little enthusiasm was displayed. But on Saturday the excellent racing and close liciishos worked spectators, especially the Maori element, up to a high state of excitement. It is not often that so many close finishes arc seen 1 at a day's raciug as was 4iio case on (Saturday, and Mr. Henrys deserves praise for the manner in which he brought the material he had to work so cloee together. St. Mark, the winner of the Raukawa Cup, was at homo in tho mud, tho soft going suiting nis somewhat shaky understandings. His condition was sound, and ho was ridden by A. Neale in the crouching seat. It was JNeale's nrst ;)ttempt in pubHc at the Sloan manner of ridings and although he landed his mount a winner his style is capable of a lot of improvement. He appeared to have little or no control' over nis mount, and had the latter stumbled goodness only knows how horse and rider would have fared. When they passed the winning post it seemed as though Neale had all his work cut out to stick on to the horse's back. There was no mistake made about St. Mark winning, for he cleared away from the distance. A rise of 171b in the Te Horo Handicap on the second day stopped the St. Leger-Leorina gelding. He could not get to the front, but was handy at the home turn. Lady's. Link, who ran second to St. Mark in the Cup, came out in th§ Eangiuru Flying, and qatching Smithy at the distance, ran home with a big advantage. On the second day in the Te Horo, with 7st 81b, 61b- more than she had in the Cup, the game daughter of Chain Link-Kitty Totara battled out a great finish, and Just, got up on the post from Jadoo and Ostiak. Lady's Link has much improved of late, and should be heard of again in the welter events this winter. Ostiak was the fittest horse on the ground, and he carried his complimentary weights of 9at 131b and 9st' 41b in, good style. Had he been saved for a shorter run in the Te Horo Handicap he would probably have won. Ostiak is another instance of what time and condition will make a horde <if he is any good at all. His pace Jhas never been denied, but up to the last four months he was often found wanting at the end of six and even five .furlongs When the pace has been stout. Now he comes out in <a mile and a furlong race with 9st 41b up and performs really well. Jadoo ran a fair race to the home turn in the Cup, but then faded out of it. In the *£c ■ Horo she performed better, and was only "blown out" in the last stride, when she would have paid close on £30 dividend had she' won. She is a good little mare for her inches, and as game as possible. Her half-sister Daphne got left badly in the Cup, and ran in the rear for most of tho journey. On the second day Brillantine showed tho. way to the home bend in the Te Horo, but could not come on. Later on in the day, however, she was galloping the best of anything at the end of the six furlongs in. the Railway Handicap, and bounded up to Gipsy Queen on the post, the judge declaring a dead heat between the, pair, f Daphne has been a good investment for Mr. J. T. Blake, and when she wins, ■ which is pretty often, generally returns a good dividend. This time she paid £5 14s in a deo.d heat. Ocean Blue, the horse that won for Mr. Gollan in the Old Country, and of whom great tilings are expected next season, is a half-brother to Jadoo and Daphne, and the gameness of the family should stand him in, good stead. Fashion' who was very well, ran somewhat erratically in the Cup. He seemed to be beaten at the home turn, but when pulled together he- came .again and finished well, running into third place. The heavy going hampered him, as it did the other Hutt horses Melwood and Waterford, both of whom nevertheless ran, creditably in their engagements. Both were backed by .their owner-trainer. Their stabf.emate Sentry also carried the confidence of the stable in the Kangiuru Handicap. He waa in- front for a time, but Smithy set such a strong pace that it soon settled Sentry. "Mr. W. Blackmore" must be utterly sick and tired of the Vanguard horse. He has kept him nearly twelve months without winning a race. Sentry's sort are better rid of. Gipsy Queen, after running two seconds at the Wanganui Meeting, waa brought down for the second day, and she .divided 150 aova in the Railway Handicap. The performance was highly creditable, for alter running at Wanganui she had to be shipped to Palmerston the same, day, >and on to Otaki the next morning, racing there in the afternoon. The Dreadnought-Marion filly Israene looked well, but the going interfered with her -chance. She had little chance either day. Ruamahanga was galloping well at the home turn in several Of his engagements, but hs condition was not good enough to see- out the finishes with his big weights: The hacks -were . a moderate lot. Plaidie cut down the "good thing" Cornea in«th"e Otaki Hock Handicap, and wojn by a small margin. Fit and well Plaidie is capable of something better than, hack racing. She is well enough bred-— my Quilt— Jeaugail, Undine's dam. Cornea looked all over a winner when turning for home in the race that Plaidie won, but had to be content with second place. She ,went up 91b in the seven furlongs Ohau Handicap on Saturday, and was one of the first to leave tho mark, but she could not retain her position, and drifted back into the mob. She was, however, putting .in good work at the end, trad only just missed a situation. Rags ran so wretchedly on the first day, finishing at least 150 yds behind Cornea, that Mr. Henrys took liberties with him in the Ohau Hack Handicap, dropping him a stone, and he thus met Cornea on 231b better terms. Jenkins rode him on the first day, but he ran so poorly that the jockey preferred the mount on General Wolfe in the Ohau Handicap, and A. Mab was put up on Rags. To the surprise of Jenkins, Rags just got up and won. Rags is a three-year-old gelding by Quilt —Nymph, and is a promising sort. Katriona, who had a runaway victory in the Maiden Plate through Eketerina, Passeropoule and Cobra being left at the post, is a flighty daughter of Krina, by St. Andrew. She can. gallop fast, but has had bad hocks, and continually strikes them. " She went mad on the second day and 1 bolted a couple of miles. Eketerina is one, of the unluckiest mares • racing in these parts. She has pace, but runs iwithout luck, and ithe latter has more than anything to do with success at the racing game. Eketerina's day will, however, probably come soon,, and it> aay-aot b*.long, : fotf on, Otaki form.

she is sure to win hack races, providing she keeps all right. Cobra, who ran second in the Maiden and the Final Scurry, is a half-brother to The Friar by Torpedo. He ia ovjned by Daphne's owner (Mr. J. T. Blake). Cobra finished well in the Maiden, but ho seemed to vquit it in the Scurry. General Wolfe, tho Wolverine— Sortie black, was written down as a rogue when Tom Clark had him at the Htitt, but there was no mistaking his gameness last wedk. He •got off badly in his first ran and then finished fourth. Jenkins was then put on him in the Hack Welter, and having the big Tirea in the straight under pressure, won comfortably at the- end. Tirea, an awkward-looking son of Haiwaka — Maramatahi, has tho gift of galloping, but either his heart is in the wrong place or else the heavy going settled him, for as soon as he was done pulling he was licked. Mourner, who wns favourite for the Hack Welfcer, won by General Wolfe, is a Voltigeur all over, and a good-looking one at that, iiis form was too bad to be true, and I suppose the ground had a lot to do with his indifferent display. Dormant, although a commoner in appearance, has a good style of galloping, and he can go fast. He won the Telegraph Welter in good style, but had not much to spare from the old Rata, to whom hewas conceding 81b. Had the going been firm, Rata woul<i[ have beaten him. Rata, who ran in the nomination of Mr. F. Martin, would have paid over £20 dividend. Punawai seems to be coming back to form. She was having a bay in tho decision of the Telegraph Welter half way/iip the running, but' died away in the last bit. Mr. Macara's fine-looking black mare Greensleeve has often shown her ability to gallop, but has usually been found wanting at the business end. However, with the aid of more condition she ran the six furlongs of the' Flying Hack Handicap in good style, and stalled off both Tutua and Stipend in, the run home. She had a bad run in her second day's engagement. Stipend is a handsome mare, and fought gamely when she got clear. She ought to be heard of in the future. Tutua ran creditably, and .would have paid splendid dividends had he won — £247 in the Hack Flying. He is by Rangatira — Riporipo. Mustella ran a better race on the second day than she did on the first. Nothing had a chance with the Tattler mare. Rain, who ran second to her, is a nice mare by Quilt — Ua. Stockade perhaps never looked better, and he certainly has never run better over hurdles than he did last week. He won the first day's hurdle race comfortably with list 81b) and had he not rnefc^ with bad luck at the start on Saturday and been ridden a better race, he would have beaten Smithy. The latter performed well for a new beginner, and he is worth watching for hurdle events. He has lots of pace and is a bold and capable fencer. Turanganui was looked upon as a good thing for Friday's hurdle race, but he failed to see out the last bit. He needs a little more schooling. He was in splendid condition, and made "norace" of the Scurry. Grey Ribbon and Dormant ran well, and they will be handy at the finishes of hurdle races this winter. t NOTES. The Grand Steeplechase of Paris, which will be run on 9th June, is a weight-fbr-age race of tho value of 4800 soys, together with » cup to the value of 400 soys, in addition to which there is a heavy sweepstake. The value of „the race last year was close upon 6000 soys. It is stated that at a certain stud farm in England the weanlings are taught to •face the barrier before they scamper off to their pasture. They are all turned into a kind of runway, with a barrier at the end. When they are in a line the lever is pressed, and away the youngsters go. Those who are interested in the subject of the King's connection with the turf will read with, mingled surprise and pleasure the letter quoted in the life of King Edward, which was published the other day (says the St. James's Gazette). The letter was written \to the Archbishop of Canterbury after the Tranby Croft trial, and in it King Edward, then" Prince 'of Wales, said: — "A recent trial, which no on* deplores more than I do, and which I was powerless to prevent, gave occasion to the press to make most bitter and unjust attacks ., upon me, knowing that I am defenceless, and I am sure that politics are not mixed up in it ! The whole matter has now died out, and I 1 think, therefore, it would be inopportune for me in any public manner to allude to the painful subject which brought such a torrent of abuse upon me, not only by the press, but by the ' Low Church, and especially the Nonconformists. . . . . I have a horror of gambling, and should always do my utmost to discourage others who have an inclination for it, as I consider that gambling, like intemperance, is one of the greatest curses which the country can be afHictec? with. • Horseracing may produce gambling or it may not, , but I have always looked upon it as a manly sport which is popular with Englishmen of all classes — and there is no> reason why it should be looked upon as a gambling transaction." The running of Plaidie in the Hack Race on the first day of the Hutt Meeting .disappointed her connections, her owner, Mr. James Macara, was at a, loss to account for it. She got off well, but was immediately in trouble. She finished lost. Of course, this was not. looked upon as the mare's 'true form, and, the mystery was all the greater as she had been well backed by her owner and stable. Since the Hutt Meeting she has given Mr. Macara much anxiety, and he has been afraid to ask her a question on the track. Therefore, he took her to Otaki in company with Greensieeye without the, slightest hope of her being successful in her engagement; and in fact he started her to see how she would shape, only putting a pound on. her in case she won. This she did handsomely, fighting out as game a finish as one could wish to see, and winning with ease. Mr. Macara' is a straightforward owner, and sportsmen generally are pleased at his success at Otaki and at his mar»'s return to form. Mrs. M'Vinish, wife of Mr. A. M'Vinish, the welf-known Hutt boniface and racehorse owner, died this week. Mr. M'Vinish has the sympathy of many friends in his loss. The Hutt contingent failed to win a race at tho Otaki Meeting, and the reverses of Stepina, Fashion, Cornea, Mclwood, Sentry, Waterford, und Ruamahunga cost their connections and the followers of the respective stables a lot of money. Stay-at-home backers also lost heavily over the meeting, the only horses that were backed for ■money which proved successful being Dormant in the Hock Welter and Turanganui in the Final Scurry on the second day. Referring to the City and Suburban race, won at Epaom by Mr. Spencer Gollan's horse Australian * Star, the Sportsman says: — "Nothing stood any chance with Australian Star ? who drew right away a quarter of a mile from home, and supplemented his London Cup victory with ease. Mr. Spencer Gollan, who is an all-round sportsman, was much congratulated on his success. Australian Star had won tho race for the last quarter of a mile." The writer continues: — "The story of the race requires little telling, for it was really very nearly a repetition of the London Cup at Alexandra Park, as, when once Australian . Star took) up the running a quarter of a mild from home nothing else bad the

i ghost of a eliance, and he won as he liked. Yesterday the ground was, if anything on the: hard side ; indeed, the horses revised a certain amount of dust as they galloped, so that Australian Star must be a very uselul animal indeed, and is apparently at homo on any sort of going." Another commentator says : — "Australian Star pulled up without having turned a hair, and the fact that the winners of the Great Metropolitan and City and Suburban eacb uarrled a 101b penalty to victory, coupled with the forward position of the similarly-penal-ised Esmeralda 11. in the Great Surrey Handicap, points to the advisableness of following winning form in the spring." Those who were present at the Wanganui Meeting were much impressed with the performances of Moifa, who Avon the Grandstand and Wanganui Steeplechases very comfortably. He is described as a fine fencer, and jumps the big country in first-class style. Moifa is a'son of Natator, from the steeplechaser Denbigh, who did Mr. Alf. Ellingham many a good turn, and her bon promises to be even as good to Mr. Ellingham as the old mare was. Moifa has received staunch support for the Auckland Steeplechase, for which he has incurred a 51b penalty, making his weight lOst 121b. He should hold a respectable chance, but I would favour one of the candidates that have been over the Ellerslie country before. The hill that has to be negotiated often interferes with the chances of strangers. Plain Bill was manifestly above himself at the Wanganui Meeting, and the racing there should do him v deal of good. He is likely to fulfil his Auckland engagements, and if hi 3 Tegs stand he will doubtless give a better account of himself at Ellerslie. * Haydn is another Sou- wester that has been improved by time. Last season he gave good promise, and ran a clipping race to Hauriri at the Hutt at the , Winter Meeting. Since then he has done good service on the flat and over hurdles amongst the hack class, drifting out into open company at Wanganui. His two successes there were easily gained, but at the same time it must be remembered that he lost a formidable opponent when Coeur de Lion fell in the, Century Hurdles, as he would doubtless have had a good chance with his light weight. Old Rodara, whom J. M'Taggart secured' for Mr. C. Crosse, of Dannevirke, for £525, came out of his shell at the Wanganui gathering, and accounted for both hack hurdle events. Rodara, who is by Voltigeur — Mascotte, won his first races over the small sticks at Otaki, with J. -i'Taggart in the saddle. Mr. F. C. Faber, of the Rutland Hotel, Wanganui, has a promising 'chaser in Opaku, an aged gelding by Gipsy King • from a Phantom ,mare. He picked him out in the hunting field, and leased him with a right to purchase. This horse was placed in J. Belcher's hands and scored with ridiculous ease in his two essays at Wanganui. In the Final Steeplechase he had Rhino and Claymore behind him., The committee of the .Canterbury Jockey Club intends to improve the stand accommodation at Riccarton, both inside and outside the enclosures. As soon as possible a water supply will be laid down, for the use of trainers. The hurdler Ngapuhi, owned by a Palmerston resident, has been placed in J. Maher's hands, to train for future engagements. pylvia was not taken from Wairarapa to the Otaki meeting, as "she had not recovered from a kick received at the Manawatu meeting. Judging by the tono of the market, says an Australian exchange, the ex-New Zealander Clansman was genuinely backed for the 14.3 Handicap at Kensington on 1 15th May, but he performed most disappointingly, and ran a. bad last. "Spectator" writes as follows concerning the favourite for the Auckland Steeplechase :— Cannongate, who was reported to have struck himself on Thursday week, has been working ever since. I cannot believe that the striking was anything serious, and cannot understand how the report got into my notes. The horse is, as far as can be judged, very well, and to-day went twice over the steeplechase course alone, and acquitted himself very well. Nor' -West has been doing good work on the tracks, and his racing at Takapuna shows what his form is like. He appeared a little_ bit on the light side, I thought, prior to the meeting, but was out on the track this morning and looked really well after the racing he did on Friday and Saturday. He has incurred a 51b penalty for the Northern Steeplechase. The news that the veteran jockey Robert Derrett had beet* disqualified for twelve months by the Dunedin Jockey Club, was received' here with much surprise. Derrett was in disgrace once before, but since he has been first horseman to Mr. G. G. Stead, he has borne a splendid character for straight riding. He has been riding on the flat longer than any other jockey in the colony, or .probably in the Southern Hemisphere, and is regarded as still at the top of his profession. Mr. Stead's jockeys seem to be having a bad run, for his second horseman, L, H. Hewitt, is at l the present time standing down for three months. Derrett, it appears, had the mount on Vanilla in the first day's selling ' race, and the Vanguard mare finished out of a place, Maremma, Witchcraft, and Hippqmenes being the leaders. On the second day the race was a furlong shorter, and the mare won by a head from Hippomencs and Witchcraft — Maremma not beingengaged. Vanilla met Hippomenes on 171b worse terms on the second day, and. Witchcraft 21b. The stewards probably have evidence of fraudulent practices, otherwise they would not have taken action. The starting of Cavaliero in- the First Handicap Hurdle Race at Takapuna (says " Spectator") was unexpected by most people, and for some reason, the horse was very much neglected on the tCtalisatoT, the betting outside being strangely at variance with the machine outside. A prominent bookmaker accepted 100 to 50 about him, .and people were actually accepting level money that he would win, amongst their number being a well-known horseman, who thought the race a fair thing for the big son of Cuirassier. The dividends paid on the horse came as a great surprise to' most people, but the reason why so many stood off the machine is one of those things that cannot be explained. ' The fact is that followers of the stable got no oncouragement from that quarter. Whether they backed the horse or some; thing else is not clear. Some say they were afraid of Hairtrigger, others that money was sent away for Cavaliero as well as put on the machines, but it is not much use taking notice of rumours of this kind. Cavaliero won, and won cleverly from Forty-Seven, but received most opposition from Nor'-west, who carried him along the last round. Rufus, a sturdy chestnut gelding, ran a really good race, finishing closer at the business end than at any stage in the race, and he may improve. Considering | that Cavaliero won comfortably in 3min 55sec on the Takapuna course, it may bo accepted that the big fellow is, as indicated last week, improving. He will probably meet something better at the .Winter Meeting of the Auckland R.C., by which time he will.be fitter still. No. "7" has held the reputation of being a very lucky number in connection with racing, and superstitious people ought to have been present at Otaki on Saturday, as in four events No. "7" won, and in another race a dead heat.

The dividends were £16 19s, £5 10s, £4 14s, £6 £5 14s. If a backer had invested a pound on No. "7 " on the day's racing he would have come out £31 17s to the good. The ponies Ivan and Little Bess have been sent from Auckland to Sydney, where they will be trained by D, Preamer. Torpina's and Bushman's exertions at Wanganui had such a detrimental effect upon them that they will have to be swelled for a time. A Hawkes Bay scribe says that as far, as looks go Tortulla's young brother Pukatea is the best of the Torpedo — Honeysuckle class. Me has improved since he was sold a few months back, and gives ample proof that with time (which he will require) he will grow into a first-class stamp. Mr. Joseph Ames, of local totalisator fame, has gone to Rotorua on a holiday trip. Fashion, Jemima, and Slepina will fulfil engagements at the Auckland Meeting, and Ostiak may make tho journey. R. Arnot is back again with Prosser, of Porirua, and he rode Dormant and Gobo at Otaki. J. M'Taggart brought The Guard back" to Porirua on Saturday. The horse stumbled when landing at a fence in the Wanganui Steeplechase, and could not be righted by Naylor. Neither horse nor rider is any the worse for the fall. Had he stood up it is thought he had a good chance of winning. Tho chief item of interest on the opening day of the Newmarket Meeting was the defeat of the Derby favourite, Mr. W. C. Whitney's Volodyovski, in the Forty-second Newmarket Biennial for three-year-olds, of £25 each, THth £500 added". The field numbered seven, and besides Volodyovski, included Mr. D. Baird'sy Veronese and Mr. L. . de Rothschild's First Fruit, all three of whom had incurred a penalty of 51b, making their weight 9st 51b, while the remaining five had the maiden allowance of 71b, and so only bad to carry Bst 71b. Betting was very evenly divided between Veronese, Volodyovski, and First Fruit, but, with the Derby favourite palpably unfit, most money wont on Veronese, and Mr. Baird's colt eventually started at 9 to 4. Volodyovski was backed at 3 to 1, and First Fruit at 7 to 2, while of the others, Colonel H. MacCalmont's St. Maclon had a good following at sixes. The race needs little description, as ait' r First Fruit had made the running to the Bushes he tired, and Sb. Maclon coming right away sailed home in the heavy going the easiest of winners by six lengths. Mr. A. James's Magic Mirror was second, six lengths ahead of Volodyovski. Time for the one mile and eleven yards, lmin 53 4-ssec. The winner is by St. Simon — Mimi, and is | a very big colt indeed, but full of quality. He only ran twice as a two-year-old, each time unsuccessfully. St. Maclon is trained by Beatty at Newmarket, and has since his victory been backed for tho Derby at 14 to 1. Tho Duke of Portland's Derby colt William the Third had a runaway victory in the Wood Dilton Stakes at Newmarket passing the post an easy sixlengths winner from Tantalus, with Ormenus 'third. The winner is by St. Simon — Gravity, and is trained" by John Porter. He had only made one public appearance previously, when he ran unplaced in the Clearwell Stakes last autumn. The colt has undoubtedly come on a lot during the winter, anu' on his Newmarket running must have an outI side chance for the Derby. j Sir J. B. Maple is having a rare turn of luck this year in ' the Old Country. His successes at Newmarket were gained by two two-year-olds, both by Common, one out of Simon's Bay and the other out of Rosamunde, named Simony and Bowry respectively. Quite a number of races have been won this year by Sir J. B. Maple, and that gentleman certainly deserves success,' as lie has had cruel luck for the last two or three years. The stable's successes have drawn attention to Lord Bob's chance for the Derby, and that colt has, in addition, been reported to have Avon a good trial. "You may as well talk about the abolition of rain by 1 doing away with gutters as of the abolition of gambling by doing away with races," said Lord Rosebery recently. Mr. A. S. Chirnside, tho well-known Australian breeder, presented the Camperdown Race Club with a cheque for £100 towards improving the racecourse, on which the Committee is spending over £1000. ' The Queensland St. Leger resulted in a dead heat between Zurich, by Correze — Matilda, and the New Zealander Circe, by Castor— Cissy. Araxes, who had won the May Day Cup at the May Day Meeting of the Q.T.C. on the 6th May, was favourite. Tom Payten's colt Lord Rudolph, who was much fancied by the Sydney contingent, did not get a place. Five steeplechase horses were killed on Victorian racecourses last month Fitzsimon, whoso purchase in England by Mr. L. D. Nathan, of Auckland} was cabled out tho other day, is advertised as standing the current season at Heather stud, near Bath, at a fee of 18 guineas. Last 33 r ear he sired no fewer thnn nine winners of stakes to the aggregate value of 3L.4U78 10s. He ia not .a very young sire, being represented by horses now running at 6 years, but he has been fairly successful in getting winners every sea.son of pretty good class.

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THE TURF. [By; Crackshot.], Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 128, 1 June 1901, Supplement

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THE TURF. [By; Crackshot.] Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 128, 1 June 1901, Supplement

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