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ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES.

c [from our special correspondent.] PERSONAL ITEMS. London, Ist September. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gilbert, who left Chri'stchuroh more than six months ago, are intending to return, to the colony by the next trip of the s.s. Wakanui, which leaves here on the 14th Inat. Mrs. J. F. Marsh, of New Plymouth, who arrived in the Oroya, is at present paying visits through the Shires. Sho expects to return, to New Zealand about November next, travelling via America. Miss Hilda Spong, who was so well known in Ne-w Zealand a few years 'ago, and of whom Australasians ar«**o proud, aB ia said here, is shortly going 10 America, where she will tour the United States going as far west as Sa.n Francisco. Yesterday afternoon Mr. W. Cloggie, of Wellington, called at the Agoncy-General, and I met him there. He tells mo that Mrs. Cloggie and he are' thoroughly r-njoy-ing themselves in the Old Countiy, and h&ve .not yet made up their minds when they will return to New Zealand. | I notice by the Huddersfield papers that the Rev. Edward' Walker, late pi the New Zealand Alliance, gave on Sunday last what is described as a most interesting address on social life in the colony in which h9 once resided. His address appears to have been confined for the most part to the social legislation of New Zoaland. Mr. and Mrs. John M'Kenzie and Miss M'Kenz.e are still in Scotland, and judging from recent letters, Mr. M'Kenzie appeals to be progressing in convalescence quite as rapidly as could be expected. It is likely, I think, that he will reserve himself as much as possible until he gets back to the colony—- fchifc in view of the general election. Last week I referred to the death of an old New Zealand veteran, Colonel Trenton Stroughton, of the 68th, who was known in connection with the Maori ware. The "good servjee pension" of £60 a year awarded to him has now been conferred on another old 68th man, Colonel Tucker, who also served in the New Zealand and Crimean Wars. A quiet Wedding of some interest to New Zealanders took place a* St. Mary Abbott's Church, Kensington, on 29th August, when Mr. Heinrich' Ferdinand yon Haasfc, eldest son of the late Sir Julius yon Haast, was married to Miss Helen Le'shman, eldest daughter of Mr. James Leishirian, of Broomrigg, Mirboo North, Gippsland, Victoria. The bride was given away by her unole, General Leishman, and Mr. F. G. Gibson was . best man. Mr. W. A. Logan, of Wellington, who landed from the Morayshire in June last, arrived in time to sit for the ftLR.C.S. and L.R.C.P. examinations, in which' he was successful. After having spent a few weeks in Scotland he has settled down at 8, Merrick-square, so as to be near Guy's Hospital. Mr. Logan will "probably prolong his stay here for some months for the purpose of further study. The"Misses I. and M. Stuart, daughters of Mr. D. T. Stuart, of Wellington, who have recently returned from Scotland, where they have spent some little time, left on Monday evening for Germany, going by way of Ostend. The length of their absence from England is quite uncertain at present, as one of the Misses Stuart, and possibly both of them, intend going on with her musical studies in that country. Frankfort, I believe, will be their headquarters. Yesterday I had a visit from Mr. Allison Smith, who M r as looking wonderfully well and vigorous, amd not a day older than, when I saw him m Melbourne nearly seven years ago. He has come Home with the full intention of remaining permanently,- and of entering upo'ii the energetic practice of his profession. His high reputation as an able and enterprising" mechanical engineer had preceded him to England, and I anticipate that he will speedily have a very good position in this country. ' Viscount Kelburne, the eldest son of Lotd and Lady Glasgow , has been inva1 ded home from the Mediterranean. He arrived on board H.M.S. Ramillies on Friday last, and now lies in the Royal Naval Btospital at Stonehouse. Lady Glasgow is staying ai Admiralty House, Devonport, so as to be near her son. Viscount Kelburne made himself very popular while he was on the Australasian station, both as the son of a Governor and as a naval officer, as well as a polo player. It will interest many people in New Zealand, including all who have travelled by the White Star steamer lonic a few years ago, to- learn that her commander in those days (Captain Cameron.) has been 1 appointed to command the gigantic new steamer Oceanic, recently built by the White Star line, which begins her first passage across the Atlantic to-morrow. It will be remembered that Captain Cameron mirried the third daughter of the late Hon. John Martin,, M.L.C., of Wellington. Mrs. Cameron, has resided near Liverpool for some years past. I learn that Lieut. -General Sir Charles Mansfield Clairke,* who not long since vacated the Madras command, and is at present exercising chief control over the manoeuvres on Salisbury Plain, has been selected to succeed Sir George White as Quarter-master-Genera,!. Sir Charles Mansfield Clarke saw active service in New Zealand and South Africa';^ the first in the Maori War of 1861, and th© .latter in 'he Zulu War of 1879, when he commanded his regiment, the 57th (Die Hards), at the Battle of Ginghilovo and the relief of Etshowe, after which he was engaged i!n the operations in Basutola-nd, and against the tribes in the Drakensberg. Sir Charles Mansfield Clarke has enjoyed the widest experience as a- staff officer. From the time he was foxt adjutant at Taranaki, in New Zealand until now that he has become one of the great heads of the War Office, he has been almost continuously employed on the staff, and this extensive knowledge of detail has gained for him the soubriquet in the Army of "Orderly-room Clarke." He has been D.A.Q.M.G. in New Zealand, A.A.G. at Aldershot, A.A.G. at the War Office, D.A.G. in Ireland, and finally D.A.G. to the forces at headquarters. He had also commanded a regiment for two years, an Aldershot brigade for three years, and last of all an army corps in India. It was stated yesterday in an AngloColoniml weekly paper that Mr. J. G. Ward had "triumphantly accomplished the object of his visit to this country," and that "not only has he settled in full with his creditors here, but so strong is the sense of the uprightness which has characterised his business relations with them that they have .made Mrs. Ward the recipient of a very handsome token of their appreciation of her husband's .honourable procedure." It is further stated that "Mr. Ward has made arrangements which will enable him to carry on his commercial concerns on an extended scale, and, at the same time, to devote that attention to public affairs for which he is so eminently fitted." I give these statements without either comment or verification. Mr. 1 1 ard, since he has been in England this time, has proved almost inaccessible, no doubt in consequence of the close attention and large amount of fcimo ft-equired by his special business. Therefore I can only forward to you this information, wh eh has evidently been specially communicated to the paper from which I quote. That th© paper referred/

to has manifestly a disposition very friendly to Mr. Ward is, I think, shown mi the following observations of its "City man." He says : — "Mr. Ward is leaving for New Zealand in a few days' time, and will, it.' is to bo hoped, speedily resume a position in the Seddon Ministry, to which his acquisitiori would add so much strength and popularity. Mr. Seddon is fighting «i splendid single- hamded battle on behalf of the Liberal Party in New Zealand, but even he, I think, will welcome the services of a lieutenant who has already fought in so many gallant battles in the cause which Sir George Grey inaueuaated."

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Bibliographic details

ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES., Evening Post, Volume LVIII, Issue 90, 13 October 1899

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ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES. Evening Post, Volume LVIII, Issue 90, 13 October 1899

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