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TRUE SPORTSMEN.

While the English football team was in Queensland its captain, the Rev. M. Mullineux, was interviewed by a representative of the Brisbane Courier, In the courso of his remarks the reverend gentleman spoke strongly of ihe tendency among Australians players to "pointing" or tricks. By " pointing " Mr. Mullineux evidently meant what in forcible modern slang might bo called " cadging " little advantages. A referee, for instance, cannot have his eyes upon the whole field, nor can he see distinctly all that is happening even where tho ball is actually in play. Mr. Mullineux complained that colonial footballers wero incliued to abuse tho freedom from supervision that this circumstanco allows. Tiusting to tho referee's inability to see what was going on, they used tricks that wero quite illegitimate. Football, like almost any other game, has its etiquette as well as its laws, and among honourable men who play for the pure love of the sport n breach of etiquette is a worso sin than one of n law for which the penalty is certain ; and there can be no doubt that this is a just and proper sentiment, for a breach of otiquetto, deliberately committed because no penalty can bo enforced, is essentially a mean and unsportsmanlike act. There are

muny phiycis in theso colonies, our own nuiong the number, who think iL rather a " smart" thing, us they would term it, t.i secure (in advantage over an opponent by a trick which, however contrary to the spirit of the game, cannot for some reason or another be made to carry the penalty it deserves. Though a certain type of man or youth might consider such conduct " smart," tlio honourable and self-respect-ins; bportsmnn cannot but regard it as little bettor than cheating at cards or "stiff running" at raws. Although some of our young athletes may not realise this tiuth, muny an old footballer can be found in our midst deploring the decadence, owing to this very uiiscrunulousness, of the modern game from the standpoint of sport. This is a feutuie of the game that seriously needs amendment, and Mr. Mullincux is to be congratulated upon having brought it under public notice.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP18990807.2.25

Bibliographic details

TRUE SPORTSMEN., Evening Post, Issue 32, 7 August 1899

Word Count
362

TRUE SPORTSMEN. Evening Post, Issue 32, 7 August 1899

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