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THE GENERAL ELECTION'S

MR. M'LEAN AND THE ELECTORS. THE ROWDIEST MEETING ON RECORD. The Princess Theatre was the scone last night of one of the most uproarious meetings yet held in Wellington. Mr. M'Lean'a veraoity had been impeached, and ho had publicly announced his intontion of refuting the charges. Mr. A. Orr.whomadothoacousation, had declared h's determination to Bubstantialo his statements, and the word had been pabscd round town that there was going to bo some fun. This was the explanation of tho bumper house. At half-past seven every seat in the hall and pillory was filled. At a quarter to eight peoplo bad crowded the stage, heads peeped out from the wings, peoplo wero perched on the steps loading to the stage and wherever there was an empty space in front of it, and the passages were choked. What would have happened had a panic occurred it is horrible to think of. Mr. M'i-ean commenced his speech at 7.50, having previously been introduced by the Wov. J. Crcives, Chairman, who begged his audience, " as they appeared to 1,0 somewhat lively," to give a fair and quiet hearing to tho man who had so faithfully represented them in Parliament— (" Oh ")— and consistently supported a Government ■vhich had done its best to improve the condition of the people. ("Yes" and "No. l^ Mr. M'Loan, on coming forward, also asked that he should bo given a quiet lisaring, because there were many of the gontlor sex present. He proposed to deal first with politics, and afterwards answer the charges which had been made against him. During the thirteen years he had lived in this city ho had met many men and many charges, but never before had so rauoli been made of a charge which had bo very little in it. (Uproar.) They wero his jury, and all ho asked for was fair play, suoh as ho was prepared to give to bis opponents. He then proceeded to touch upon various political topics, going over mnch the same ground that ho had covered in his previous speech at the Theatre Royal. Ho succeeded in expounding big views on tho land question and the Land and Income Tax without much interruption, but in commencing to explain tho position of the Government with regard to the public debt, a row occurred at tho back of the hall which interrupted the proceedings for fully five minutes. The Chairman implored the andionce to keep quiet, bntto all ho said the audience responded with " Amen." However, the candidate gota hearing after a time, and disposed of the Land for Settlement Bill, the Rating Act, and various local matters, claiming credit for what he had done in regard to the vole for tho extension of the Hospital, and the Te Aro Goods shed. The Alcoholic Liquors Bill was negotiated with several interruptions, which irritated somebody on the stage so muoh that he angrily exclaimed, " Why don t you listen, you fools?" At the Coal Mines Acquisition Bill, Mr. M'Loan was met with cries of "Dry hash," "Give u» something fresh f" However, ho explained his idooß, and then tuckled the question of a National Bank and State enrrency. In spite of his repeated appeals for a hearing on a question which ho said was of the greatest importance to thorn nil, the audience refused to listen to him, and at last Mr. M'Lean lost all patience, and angrily exclaimed that " those who didn't want to hear him could go home " There was such an uproar .at the back at this time that the candidate jumped off tho stage, and pushing his way through tho crowd in tlio passage, « hieh opened out as much as possible to allow him to pass, he disappeared through the front door.and presently returned with two police constables. When he reascended to the stage, ho announced that tho first man who made a noise would bo givon into custody, a remark which was received with shrieks of laughter, cheers, and groans. There were loud cries of "Shut up," and "Go homo," and seeing that it was of no nse plunging farther into politics, Mr. M* I e:ui folded up his notes, and remarked eotto vocb to his Chairman, " it's no use ; I'll got to the charges, and be done with it." Turning to the audience, ho asked if they would give him a hearing white he answered the ohnrge3 made against him. 'J here were responding yells of "Yes" from every part of the hall, and Mr. M'Lean then proceeded to explain how the matter arose. He read out throe affidavits bearing on the subjeot— one made by himself, Knottier by his olerk (Mr. R. J. Barnes), and a third by a person whom, for reasons which he stated, ho did not name. (They appear in advertisement form elsewhere.) Ho claimed that these affidavits completely exonerated him from the charges. It would bo absolute nonsense for him to sty that he had nover taken out a judgment summons, but he claimed that Mr. Orr had taken an unfair advantage of him. This particular charge, he contonded, had complotoly broken down, and he was perfectly satisfied to leave it to the judgment of his audience. Next ho had something to say as to tho Evening Proas. This paper, lie said, had chosen to enter into his private businn-s niraira, and ha<l o\on p no to the tiutiMc of engaging a solicitor to search th« C.-nut records for e\ M< uco ng.iii!~fc him One of the staff ot tho pa-pur luil tjld him that the was paM to kill him. (A^oioe, " So.") It was a fact, and he would ropent it. The person referred to had said that ho uus paid to kill him (Mr. M'Lean), and " by God, he would do 10." He asked who it was paid him? It was his opponents in this contest, and was it not a fact that one of the largest shareholders in the Evening Press, a Conservative man, was asking him to do the dirty work because he was afraid to do it himself? Mr. M'Lean proceeded, amidst some interruption, to name tho directors of the paper, and said they were all endeavouring to kill him politically. (A voice, " They can't do it "; and another voice, " Thoy can.") This was a paper that would not sell for a penny, and whioh thoy had to send round by cartloads for nothing. (Laughter.) These opponents of his ought to come forward and meet him face to face . Hero Mr. J. Wilkie , a member of tho staff of tiro Evouiujj~PreMs, pushed his way to tho front and endeavoured to ascend the platform, but Mr. M'Lean ordered him to Bit down, and tho audience became uproarious. When Mr. M'Lean could obtain a hearing again he said he was not afraid to meet this man and givo him a hearing if tho audience would consent to it. He was not afraid of him (Interruption.) Ho had met the charges, and refuted them. Regarding the affidavit which had been Bworn against him, the Evening Post had refused to publish it evon as an advertisement — (cheers) — because it was desirous of seeing fair play, bat the Press was willing to receive into its columns what the Post would not accept. His nomination as a candidate had been sent in that day, and he would go to tho poll, and if they elected him ho would again do his best in their interests, and would support the Liberal measures of any Liberal Government which might be in power, and represent thn masses and not the classes of New Zealand. (Loud applanse.) The Chairman then inviteS Mr. Allan Orr to give his version of tho charges, and asked tho meeting to listen to Mr. Orr. This tho meeting seemod but very little inclined to do, and Mr. Orr's reception was composed of cheers and groans, and it was some time before he could got a hearing. When the audienco had quietened down somewhat, Mr. Orr remarked that he was told that he would not be heard, and he complained that Mr. M'Lean's Committee was responsible for it. (Cries of "Pay your debts.") He was prepared to provo to them that at all events he was an honest man. (Oh !) A very cowardly attack had been made upon him by Mr. M'Lsan. Was it, ho asked, a Bin. for a man to have to borrow money because he went security for somebody"? (Cries of "Too thin;" "Chuck him ont, Ac") He was in possession of certain faots. (Interruption, and cries of " Shut up," " Go on," &a ) The question was whether Mr. M'Lean had instituted proceedings against any person upon a judgment summons. (Cries of " No," and uproar.) The Chairman, Mr. R. P. Johnson, and Mr. M'Lean stronuously endeavoured to restore order, but without avail. Thero wore groans given for Mr. Orr, and cheers for Mr. M'Lean, and groans for an Evening Press representative who had advanced to the platform to advise Mr Orr to stand to his guns. Tho Chairman at last shouted out that this sort of thing could not go on all night, and if tho audionco would not give Mr. Orr a bearing the meeting would have to close. Mr. Orr thon got a hearing for a few minutes. He said he had an affidavit, and ho produced a bulky bundle of blue papor, amidst orios of " That's a summons," and "Give it to the Chairman -to road." Mr. Orr, however, declined to givo it to tho Chairman, and faced tho audience for quite 10 minutes without being able to make himself heard. Finally, seeing that it was impossible to speak without complying with the wishes of the meeting, he went over to tho Chairman and held a whispered conference with him. Mr. Crowes, having restored silence, said that Mr. Orr had explained to him that what he wanted to road was -not an affidavit, but only a written statement. (Cries of " Chuck him ont of the window!") It was merely the copy of a statement, which was not signed. (Yells, groans, and hisses, and shouts of "Sit down," "Dry up," and ''Get out," and tho audience as one man got upon its foot, and hats and arms wero to be seen waving in all directions.) Mr. M'Lean said it was impossible for the meeting to go any further. If his opponents had anything to say, thoy could engage the Opera House next week and aay it. This was his hall, and the ease had broken down. (" Yes?' " No," and Cheers.) Mr. Orr again endeavoured to got a hearing, and while Mr. M'Lean was expostulating with him someone on tho pintform gave Mr. Orr a push, and he lost his balance and descended on his foot to tho floor of tho hall. He was qniokly on the platform again, but tho ohmax had been reached, and with loud shouts and oheors the people at tho back of the hall pressed forward and rushed the stage, paying no attention to orieß raised of " Take oare of the ladies," which were to bo heard on every side. Simultaneously, the gaslights appeared to be going out One man, loaning up on the stage in front of the chairman, made a grab at Mr. Orr, bnt Constable Cox (who suddenly appeared from the baok) and others who were on the stage hustled Mr. Orr away to the roar. Cheers were given for Mr. M'Lean, and groans for Mr. Orr, and for somo minutos tho loene was one of the greatest oonfusion. When the uproar had somewhat subsided, Mr. J. W. Poynton oame to the front of the stage and proposed the following motion :—": — " That this meeting, having heard the answer of Mr. M Lean to the ohargea of Mr. Allan Orr and tho Evening Pross, expresses its unabated confidence in him as its representative, and deprecates attaoks of this kind being resorted to in a political contest." Mr. R. White seconded the motion, which was out and declared to have been oarriod unanimously. One of the most sensational meetings ever held in Wellington terminated at ten minutes to 10 with cheers for Mr. M'Loan and the Government. MR. DUTHIE AT NJBWTOWN. In the Donald M'Lean-itreet aohoolroom laat evening, Mr. Duthie addrewed a, Urge '

mooting of electors, Mr. John Bock being in the chair. The oandidate, who was well received, referred to the oxtonsion of tho franchise to women, and went on to nay that, although a member of the Opposition, he rocognisod that the Government bnd been more sue cosaful with native land matters than with any other matter. The Government deserved credit for what it had done in connection with the East and West Coast native land matters. The Boards for the purchase of native lands would, he thought, work satisfactorily. He thought that the Government should consider that the timo had arrived when tho ownership of Maori land should bo determined. Tho bloolcs should bo surveyed, the ownership determined, and a sufficient area set apart for each native's nse. Upon the whole, he considered tho Government legislation was calculated to promote settlement, and that was why he had supported its proposals. He was, however, of opinion that the Government should have taken more money and doubled the area of land to bo thrown open. Ho did not think that a, system of leasehold was desirable, because most men would feol more independent it they possessed the freehold. There was not much to commend the etornal leasehold system to the people, but he could not see thafc it would retard settlement. Electors conld rely on it that if thoro was a change of Government they wonld be able to get their freehold. The condition requiring people to settle on their land at once was somewhat unfair. A man should not be obliged to go on his land until it had been partly oleared. One grievance he had against the Government was that the latter had not pushed on tho surveying and roading of the various blocks. Tbere was a weakness in our land laws — namely, that frequently the hono. fide settler was unable to get land, as he had not been successful in the ballot. Leaseholds did not constitute a good security, and the Government would find it was making a mistake if it attempted to lend money on leaseholds. The speaker went on to refer to the proposal to abolish government by party as unsatisfactory, and ho expressed Jthe opinion that it would be vory unwise to adopt the system of balloting for members of the Upper House, as suggested by Sir E. Stout. The forms of tho Honse were responsible for a good deal of the waste of time which took place each sossion. No man should go into the House as tho nominee, of any Government, because free criticism was not allowed to suoh a man. Ho (Sir. Dnthie) heard the Premier tell Mr. Willis that the Government did not want any man in the Party who had a conscience. That was not a Tight thing for any Premier to say. (Hear, hear.) It was an abuso of Parliamentary Government. Ho was Borry to notice that Mr. Willis, speaking at Wanganui, had again announced himself as a Government supporter. Tho Bpeaker disapproved of tho Noxious Weeds Bill and tho Koads Validation Bill. He sympathised with tho Government in tho purchase of the Cheviot estate, beeaußO ho thought it was not right that one man should continue to hold a whole country side, but he thought it was an abuse of power for the Government to refuse to show how they had expended the receipts from the sale. He noticed that a letter had appeared in the Post charging him with having voted against the Workmen's Wages Bill. When the debate was on ho baid he thought the Workmen's Lien Bill was SiUlßcient, but as a matter of fact, he had supported tho Workmen's Wages Bill. The spoakor thought too mnch had been made of the Labour Bureau, but still he did not wish to express a strong advene opinion regarding it. The system was an experiment, but he could not help thinking it had cost too much. If elected he would yoto for a reduction of the honorarium. Ministers should bo paid more than at present, and should be made to occupy the official residences. The candidate strongly condemned tho payment of the ;£SSO to the new Legislative Councillors. Mr. Dntliio, whoso speech was frequently applauded, resumed his seat amidst loud applause. On tho motion of Mr. Joseph Kitchen, seconded by Mr. Thos. Gordon, a vote of thanks and confidence was carried nnanimoasly. ■■

Ilio following candidates to-day bunded in tlieir nomination papers to the Returning Officer :— Francis TI. Fraser, proposed by John Ewavt, physician j H. Brittain, chemist ; Mary Ann Wright, married woman ; and Jessio Kinmond Hutohon, teacher. Eobort Stont, Kt., nominated by J. W. Poynton, barrister ; P. R. Eussell, aaddler ; Allan Ward, tailor, and President of the Trades Council ; Mesdames J. Flimmer, Mary Ann Wright, and Louisa Hancox. Francis H. D. Bell, nominated by John Gannaway, stevedore ; Chas. P. Skerrett, solicitor ; Geo. Tiller, cabinetmaker ; Archibald Hall, coach proprietor ; Francis Penty, architect ; Mrs. Susan Tonks, Webb-street. John Duthie, proposed by George Donton, ironmonger, and Elizabeth Ann Anderson, married woman, Wellington-terrace. Goorgo Fisher, nominated by Jas. Lookio, builder; William Cable, engineer; Henry Thomas Liversage, boilermalcor. Sir Eoberb Stout addressed two meetings yesterday — one in the afternoon at the Princesß Theatre, which waß attended by upwards of 150 women, and the other in the Primitive Methodist School, Sydney-street He dealt with the subjects of commerce and banking, and mentioned the fact that in 1878, and also in 1885, he endeavoured to establish commercial relations with Canada, and in this connection he showed his correspondence with Sir John Macdonald. Sir Robert Stout had then advocated laying a cable to Vancouver, and also advised tho establishing of trade with Fiji, Canada, Tonga, and Samoa. Replying to questions, the candidate said he considered hotel assistants should have a weekly half-holiday as well as shop assistants. He denied that his Government had reduced platelayers' wages below 6s per day, nor had be ever said Wellington should be deprived of representation. On tho contrary, he had opposed any such proposal. Bank clerks, ho considered, should not be overworked, or have to do nightwork. A vote of confidence, on the motion of Mossrs. Gibson and Reedy, was agreed to. A vote of thanks was also passed to Mr. Lambert, who prosided. Mr. T. Kennedy Macdonald held a meeting in the Clyde-quay school laßt evening, Mr. W. Cable in the chair. Tho speech was largely a repetition of that which Mr. Mandonald delivered at his first meeting. Capital and -Labour, he nrged, should go hand in hand, in order to restore permanent prosperity. Mr. James Brace, at tho conclusion of the address, moved a vote of thanks to and confidence in Mr. Macdonald, which was seconded by Mr. Ziman. As an amendmont, Mr. D. Gain moved " That whilst thanking the candidate for his addross, this meeting cannot record its confidence in him in consequence of his viows on the Alcoholic Liquor Sales Act." Mr. Macdonald then spoke briefly as to the ainondment, and appealed especially to the women present not to permit tho Liberal triumphs which their fathers and husbands had fought for, to be imperilled by this vexed question of the liquor traffic, which was dividing tho Liberal Party. The amendment was lost, there being only six hands held np for it. The motion was then put and deolared carried by a large majority. At the close of the mooting a strong committee was appointed. Mi 1 . Dwan addressed a large number of electors in Kilminster's Hall, Tinakoriroad, last night. Mr. Skinner presided. Mr. Dwan began by stating that ho was not a nominee of tho present Government, but was running on an independent tioket, although he believed in the polioy of tho present Government. He thonght that the Government ought to secure a loan of .£3,000,000 to help in "pening up the.lands for settlement. He was opposed to Prohibition. He supported women's franchise, religious instruction in schools, and assistance to volunteering, provided tho Government Bupplied tho men with giod weapons. He thonght no preferonoe should be given to certain men when hands were required for the drainage work 3. In reply to questions, Mr. Dwan said that he would not give the Railway Commissioners arbitrary power, but wonld have a Minister with a casting vote put over them, tie was not in favour of bursting up friendly societies. If elected he wonld support compulsory arbitration and conciliation. On tho motion of Mr. Fergußon, seconded by Mr. Skinner, a vote of tbankß and conndonoe was carried unanimously. Mr. J. G. Wilson addressed a well-attended mooting of Otaki doctors at Wallacevttle lo3t ovoning, Mr. James Fairy boing in the chair. The candidate, who spoke for about an hour, received a vote of thanks and confidence on tho motion of Mr. Downing, seconded by Mr. Gorrie. Mr. T. M. Wilford addressed a large number of electors at Tawa Flat last evening, Mr. Denis Ryan in tho chair. A voto of thanks and confidence was, on tho motion of Mr. E. W. Earp, seconded by Mr. John Blackford, carried, with only four dissentients. Mr. Wilford also addressed the electors of Porirua at the PnblU Hall, Mr. A. H. Bennio being voted to the chair. Mr. H. Warner moved, and Mr. G Franklin seconded, a rote of thanks and of confidence in tho candidate and tho Government, which was carried unanimously. Throo cheers wore given for the oandidato and tho Government Dr. Newmau addrossod a large meeting of electors at Ohiro last night, Mr. Keys in the chair. A vote of thanks and confidence, proposed and seconded by Messrs. Gooder and Arena, was carried by a large majority. More than 100 women favourable to Sir Robert Stout's candidature met at the Central Committee Rooms, Lambton-quay, yesterday afternoon, Mrs. Plimmer presiding. Persons in favour of selecting Parliamentary candidates who will snpport the introduction of religious instruction into the primary sohools of the colony, are invited by advertisement to meet at St. Mark's sobool■room on Monday ovoning. Owing to the small attendance, Mr. Traverß did not speak in the Newtown School lost evening. A voto of thanks and confidence was passed to Mr. Vogal at a meeting in Cloke's Hall, Tinakori-road, last evening. In the afternoon, he spoke at a meeting of Nowtown women, and a committee was formed to secure his return. Mrs. Bell met » number of women at Newtown yesterday, when a. women's committee was formed' to securo Mr. Bell's return. Large numbers of new advertisements, convening meetings of the various election oommitteea, and also addresses by the candidates, appear on our third and fourth pages, Addresses to the electors by Messrs. Travers and Vogel are printed on the fourth page. Shop assistants are reminded of the meeting fixed for Monday evening.

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THE GENERAL ELECTION'S, Evening Post, Volume XLVI, Issue 120, 18 November 1893

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THE GENERAL ELECTION'S Evening Post, Volume XLVI, Issue 120, 18 November 1893

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