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MARRIAGE OF MIDGETS. Chicago, October 26.

Warm interest is manifested in professional circles at the approaching nuptials of Major Zamora, billed us tho " triple- jointed midget," and Tina Gonghmau, " the smallest living woman." The courtship of the Jlajor was not at all rosy, however. Hiß first meeting with his affianced was a professional one. This was two years ago, and they exhibited on the same platform in a museum in St. Louis. Tina's first feeling was of envy, as previous to the appearance of the Major she was tho star attraction, being only oG inches in height, and weighing but 621b. The appearance of the Major I diminished her glory, for he lacked ! four inches of a yard in height, was

eight pounds lighter <han Tina, and ' bositlos was triplo-jointod. It was a caao of lovo at liiat sight with the Major. Vows of otorn il lovo wore pledgod, and Tinii, mm Lie to resist tho earnost entroutius of her adorer, promised to become Mine. Zamora. Miss Tina confesses to 30 yenrs, and tho Mujor has livod tlneo yours longer or ahorter. The bride wan born in England, and the Major honoured St. Johns, N.F., with his birth. Both have beon <m exhibition for sovorul yours in tho Uitilril flhitcm and England, and ar« grout curiuMtiai in their way.

80MB b'AMOUS BLUNDERS. Goldsmith uned to confess, with infinite good humour, that ho nlwaye argued best when alono; but, bethatas it may, there is no doubt that tho honour of perpetrating ono of the most famous conversational blunders on record rightly belongs to him. " I wonder," ho said to Lord Shelborne, on the occasion referred to, " they should call your Lordship Malagrida, for Malagrida was a very good man." One night at a ball a gentleman said to Lord North — who, as is wellknown, was not remarkable for his good looks — " Pray, my Lord, who is that ugly woman sitting there '/" "This is my youngest sister," said his Lordship. " Good heavens." j said the gentleman, " I don't moan j her; I mean the next." "That is my eldest sister," was the reply. "I protest," cried the unfortunate mau, making a final desperate offort to extricate himself from his dilemma — "I don't mean her. but tho third." "That is my wife," came with cruel distinctness. "The devil!" was tho despairing exclamation of tho now utterly demoralised questioner. ' ' You may well say that," calmly observed Lord North, " for she is as ugly as one. But, sir, console yourself ; we are, indeed, the ugliest family in England." This somewhat reminds one of the individual who, when conversing in the society of a company of ladies, and criticising rather severely the want of personal beauty in other ladies of his acquaintance, remarked, " They are the ugliest women I ever saw," and then, with extraordinary politeness, added — "present company always excepted" Stage " slips of speech" are legion, and Charles Kemble's amusing: error when he was once playing Shyloek of instead of asking " Shall I lay perjury upon my soul?" exclaiming " Shall I lay surgery upon my poll ?" has been told "many a time aud oft. ' Anotner, and if possible better known story, is that of the soldier who, on levelling his halberd to prevent Eichard from impeding the progress of Henry's funeral, with the remark, "My lord, stand back, and let the coffin pass !" exclaimed in his nervousness and excitement, " My lord, stand back, and let the parson cough." Perhaps the most amusing " slip of the tongue " to which Royalty cau lay claim is that credited to an Emperor of Austria. One day, in the palace, he came suddenly upon two of his nephews, who were engaged in an excited dispute. " I tell you," cried one to his opponent, as the Emperor entered, " you are the biggest fool in Vienna !" "Gentlemen gentlemen," said their Royal uncle, reproachfully, "you forget that I am here." — Evening Standard.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP18930107.2.74

Bibliographic details

MARRIAGE OF MIDGETS. Chicago, October 26., Evening Post, Volume XLV, Issue 5, 7 January 1893, Supplement

Word Count
649

MARRIAGE OF MIDGETS. Chicago, October 26. Evening Post, Volume XLV, Issue 5, 7 January 1893, Supplement

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