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RESIGNATION OF MAJOR CAMPBELL.

It « with extreme regret that we learn tbat Major Francis Eastwood Campbell, Clerk of the House of Representatives and Clerk of Parliaments, has tendered to His Excellency the Governor his resignation of these high offices. Major Campbell was himself an Imperial officer, and the son of Colonel Campbell, who was intimately connected with the colonisation of New Zealand. Shortly after the Constitution Act came into force, Major Campbell, then serving with his regiment in New Zealand, resigned the b word for the pen, and wa3 appointed Clerk to the newly-constituted House of Representatives. For 35 years he has held that office, with credit to himself and benefit to tho colony. Members have alwaj'B found in him a competent aud sincere advisor. His knowledgo of Parliamentary law and practice, growing riper year by yoar, has proved of immense uhb to successive Spoakers, Ministers, and members. We have never heard a whisper of political bias or personal feeling made against him. Ho has kept the House thoroughly in the strict groove of Parliamentary usage, and in tho British Empire there are now probably few better read or higher authorities on Parliamentary procedure than Major Campbell. Ever calm, courteous and considerate in the discharge of hia official duties, all who have been brought in contact with him officially will regret his resignation. We are not aware that during his long careor a single official error haa been laid to his charge. When the probability of hia early resignation was mooted last year — for ho is in his GGth year, and ho has for several sessions past shown that the severe nightwork of the session was telling on him — a statement was made that he would in all probability be callod to tho Upper House on bis retirement from official duties. At that time any addition to the Legislative Council appeared inopportune, but since thon circumstancos have altered, and several additions aro notoriously in contemplation. We have no hesitation in saying that Major Campbell's services well entitje him to the honour, and that his presence in the Legislative Council would, owing to his unrivalled Parliamentary experience, prove most beneficial to tho Legislature and to tho Colony. AVo hope tho Government will advise His Excellency to confer thia well -deserved honour on Major Campbell. No one oan tako reasonable exception to such a conrso, but lest it should be supposed that we are trying to get another Wellington member into tho Council, we may add that wo believe Major Campbell, on retirement from his official position, will probably take up his permanent residence in Auckland. We havo, thoroforo, no selfish looal reasons for advocating his elevation to a seat in tho Legislative Council.

A newsletter from our Greytown correspondent, our report of the Lower Hutt Town Board's meeting, held yesterday, and a lettor to tho Editor on " Tho Now Crusade " will be found on tho fourth page today. Information was roceived by tho Postal authorities at noon to-day stating that tho R.M.S. Ruapohu arrivod at Hobart shortly after 9 thia morning. She should got away again for Wellington this evening, in whioh case she would be due here on Saturday evening. The R.M.S. Tainui left Capotown on Saturday last, en route to Lyttelton and Wellington, via Hobart. Sir W. Tindal Robertson, M.P., whose sad end by suicide is announced in to-day's cable messages, was elected member for Brighton on the death of Aldorman D. Smith in November, 18GG. He was wellknown as a very successful physician for many years, but his sight began to fail in 1873, and ho has for somo years paat been quite blind — in this rospoct being a singularly appropriate buccossor of Mr. Fawcett, a former member for the same constituency. Sir W. T. Robertson was a staunch Conservative, and was Chairman of the Brighton Tory Caucus. He was a member of the Royal Commission on the Blind, Deaf, and Dumb, and was knighted by Hor Majesty last year. Our telograma a short timo ago recorded the fact that the schooner Cora, which had beon chartored by Messrs. Goodwin and Do Lisle, of Wellington, to open a direct trade between this port and the South Sea Islands, had become a total wreck in tho Hervey Group before she had completed her firat round voyage. By tho arrival of the Richmond from the Islands, we are in possession of full particulars of the occurrence. It appears that at tho time she was fully loaded with oranges and otlior fruit, and was on tho point of sailing for Wellington, when, during a heavy blow, sho ran upon the Kairota Reef, and quickly became a total wreck, being wodgod fast on tho rocks, and Beas breaking over her. All hands succeeded in getting ashore with safety, though Mr. Do Lisle had a narrow escape from being engulphed in the surf, being saved only by the exertions of one of tho Kanaka crow, who swam to his assistance and succeeded in bringing him ashore in a greatly exhausted state. Everything on board was lost, inoluding the clothing and money of the oaptain and charterers. On the day after, the hull of the vessel was sold for 52 dollars to the natives, and the chronometer, sextant, and other instruments whioh wore recovered wero also disposed of. Captain Abbott and Messrs. Goodwin and De Lisle then proceeded to Avarua, where they wore picked up by the Richmond and brought to Auckland. Tho hull of the vessel was insured for i>3oo, and the charterers hold tho cargo covered for .£2OO. The Cora was an Auck-land-built vessel, having been constructed there in 1866, but she was owned, we boliovo, by Mr. Martin Kennedy, of Wellington. She was 4G tons register, her dimensions being— Length 67ft, beam 16ft 7in, dopth 7ft Cm. His Honour Mr. Justice Richmond will tako Thursday's sitting of the Bankruptcy Court, when applications for discharge will bo mado by the following bankrupts : — Geo. Boothby, J. G. Ingr.im, J. G. W. Brook, H. Sundgron, and Wm. Weggery. Tho Official Assignee will apply to have tho bankruptcies of John Ludford and Charles Cheymol declared closed, and tho dato of debtors' dischargo fixud. During last month 17 patients in tho Hospital consnmed 182J pints of wines, spirits, and malt liquors, boing at the rate of 10j pints per head. In September of last year 30 patients drank 198 pints, or at the rate of 6J pints each. The quantity prescribed by each medical man last month was aa follows : — Tho House Surgeon (Dr. Ewart), 81 pints 12ozs for 4 patients ; Dr. Martin, 76 pints for 5 pationts ; Dr. Cole, 14 pints Bozs for 3 patients ; Dr. Fell, 5 pints 14ozs for 2 patients ; Dr. Collins, 3 pints ISozs for 3 patients. Two oivil cases were hoard after wo went to press yesterday. In the case of Smallwood and Gilcbrist, plumbers and tinsmiths, v. John Bortio, a claim of J6lB 10s for work done, Mr. Robinson, R.M., gavo judgment for the plaintiffs for the full amount claimod, less £d which had been paid into Court, and allowed £4 Us costs. Mr. Brown was for the plaintiff and Mr. Jellicoe defended. Evidence was takon in the case of C. Nees and Son, ironmongers, v. Mosen and Stefferson, sawmillers, a olaim of <£25 upon a dishonoured promissory note, and his Worship then adjourned the matter until this morning, whon he gave judgment for the plaintiffs, with £4, 11s costs. Mr. Fitzhcrbert, who appeared for the defendant, was given leave to appeal. Mr. Menteath acted for the plaintiff. Qnr readers scarcely need reminding that the Bland Holt Company open their season at the Opera House to-night with Pettitt & Grundy's great spectacular and naval and military drama, "Tho Union Jack." The piece requires very elaborate scenery and stage mounting, and workmen havo been busy at tho Opera House during tho last few days getting things in readiness. Some admirable effeots may, therefore, be expected. Tho regular members of tho company, whose names we gave yesterday, will in this play be assisted by 50 trained auxiliaries. We have every confidence that the return of such a successful caterer for the public amusement as Mr. Bland Holt will bo welcomed by a bumper house to-night. Westport is celebrated for its whitebait, tho water there being 1 absolutely thick with this delicious and mysterious littlo fish at the proper season. Taking advantage of this faot, Mr. Fernandos, of this city, has recently established tinning works on an extensive scale at Westport, and yesterday no less than 60 cases of lib tins wero shipped for Melbourne as the first product of this new industry. From the sample we havo tested we can say that tho tinned whitebait is a great luxury, all tho delicate flavour of tho fresh fish being retained. As whitebait is not, we believe, to be found in Australian waters, there should be in Melbourne and Sydney a very large demand for the tinned fish from Westport. Miss Newcombo, a missionary lady, who lately returnod from India through ilihealtb, will deliver her first address at the Vivian-street Baptist Church to-morrow evening at 7.30 p.m. Her meetings in Auckland were largely attended and deeply interesting. At the close of her address a numbor of Indian drosses and curiosities will be exhibited. A collection will be made on behalf of tho funds. The speoial general meeting of the Crickotera' Association, which was to have been held this evening, has been postponed until Wednesday, the 16th instant. The members of the Hutt County Counci present at the monthly meeting this morning were Councillors Wakeham (Chairman), Death, Brown, Taylor, Speedy, Lancaster, Barton, and Monaghan. Mr. Damant, Inspector of Roads, submitted a report showing that during the month ho had been enabled to rednce the cost of maintenance to ,£BS ; that three bridges— one at Ngahauranga, one at Tawa Flat, and one at Pahantanui— reqnired immediate repairs ; that he had not yet done anything with the cottage at the Akaratawa bridge, as an application had boen mado to Government by the Road Board for a grant of money for the necessary work to the bridges, and should it be granted the cottage would be required for Btorage of material, and that since last meeting he had inspected the stookade at the Upper Hutt, the oontrol of which had been handed over to the Council by the Government, and he advised that it should be offered to persons willing to rent it. On tho motion of Councillor Barton, seconded by Councillor Lancaster, the report was adopted, and it was decided- to invite alternative tenders from persons willing to rent the stockade as it now stood for a period of 7 or 21 years snbject to conditions to be drawn np by Councillors Barton, Speedy, and Brown. It was further resolved to ask Government whether they will consent to sign a lease of tho property on certain terms. Accounts amounting to JSI63 78 6d were passed for payment. This was all the business.

It is often said, not only in Wellington, bnt alßo in other parts ot the colony that the i Auckland people can never take a beating, and circumstances which have arisen from i ime to time certainly compel the least pre- l judiced of us to admit that there is a good 1 deal of truth in the statement. Only a few ] weeks ago Auckland sent South a football " team, whoee career was erpected to be one i of signal success. The combination was ; admitted to be the most powerful which had i ever been got together in the northern city, [ and ninety-nine people out of every hundred in Auckland who took any interest in the i matter felt certain that the team would i walk "rings ronnd" every opposing fifteen met in the course of the tour. A3 a matter of fact the team wero not nearly bo strong as we had been led to believe, and they returned home with anything but a satisfactory record. In Wellington their defeat was a decisive one, but they deny that they were fairly beaten, and accuse one of our players of winning the match by loafing offside. Such an assertion is utterly false, and moreover, it is contemptible. And now to turn to another matter. The yacht Jesßie Logan, which has won a largo nnmber of of racea in Auckland, haa just been brought to Wellington. Auckland yachtsmen think thero is nothing of her size to beat her in New Zealand, and they anticipate that she will have no difficulty in showing all her rivals in Wellington a clean pair of heels. Such an expression of opinion is perfectly allowable, but it is a matter of regret to learn that a letter haa been received from Anckland stating that if she i 8 beaten here it will simply be through unskilful handling. The Wellington people can, tberofore, rest assured that if any of the present fleet of yachts should defeat her fairly and squarely Aucklanders will not admit that she has been fairly vanquished. It is a great pity that our northern friends cannot take a licking like other people. Very little business was transacted at the fortnightly meeting of tho Hospital Trustees this morning. Tho members present were Messrs. F. H. Fraser (Chairman), G. Allen, C. E. Willfston, J. Taylor, and Key. H. Van Staveren. A report was submitted, showing that at the end of last month the numbor ot in-pationta was 112 — 74 males and 38 females. In accordance with tho recommendation of the House Committee it was decided that new dreeßes for the nurses should be provided at Christmas. A letter was read from Dr. Fell, Hon. Secretary of the Wellington Medical Association, asking whether tho Trustees would be willing to allow the question of tho honorary ataff'a privileges to be considered at tho ordinary meeting of tho Association on the 9th. The Trustees decided to reply in the affirmative. Leases of allotments to Mrs. R. Upham and Messrs. M. Kennedy and R. Dnignan were approved. Some slight alterations were made in the wording of the in and out-patient's tickets. Accounts amounting to £318 8s 3d wore passed for payment, subject to a satisfactory explanation being given as to certain expenditure for ironmongery, and other articles obtained without the sanction of the Trustees. An information under the Stamp Aot, which had been laid against Henry Flookton, was hoard in the Court this morning. The defendant waß aaid to have given an unstamped receipt for £2, on the 2nd of May last. In tho course of evidence it seemed that tho receipt forming the subject of the information was really a second one given at tho request of a person who had lost the first and duly stamped receipt. His Worship upheld the contention of Mr. Morison, who appeared for the defence, that no offence bad been committed, and said the evidenoe already showed that a proper receipt had been once given, and the second one waa not given as a receipt for money, but simply as a statement of account. An application by Mr. Moribon for costs against the prosecution was refused. An information under the same act, which had been kid against J. Wilkinson, was adjourned for a week, on the application of Mr. Thompson, tho defendant being out of town. The annual examination of tho Potone School was made last week by Mr. Lee. The results are as follows : — Presented, 417, including 157 infanta; 214 passed. Standard 1., 57 presented, 3 absent, 53 passed ; Standard II , GG presented, 2 absent, 1 oxcopted, 62 passed ; Standard 111., 66 presented, 4 absent, G oxcepted, 38 passed ; Standard IV., 37 presented, 1 absent, 2 oxceptod, 30 passed; Standard V., 22 presented, 1 absent, 21 passed; Standard VI., 10 presented, 1 exoepted, 8 passed; Standard VII., 2 presented, 2 passed. A two 'horse cab belonging to Mr. A. E. Drain mot with quite an adventure about 11 o'clock last evening. Tho vohiole was standing with several others opposito the establishment of Messrs. Wilson & Riohardson on the Quay. It waa blowing a perfect hurricane at the time, and to prevent the cab from being shaken by the wind Mr. Drain proceeded to plaoe some small pieces of road metal underneath the wheels. While in the act of doing thia the horses became startled by a piece of paper blowing past their heads, and bolted. Mr. Drain was knooked down and run over, but fortunately escaped with a few bruisos. The horses and cab went at a tremendous pace along tho Quay, and turning down Groy-street rushed on to the wharf, and it seemed that nothing short of a miraclo could provent the animals and the conveyance from falling into the harbour. When opposito the large orane at the end of the wharf one of the horses fell, and the other was fortunately secured by Constable Doyle and Beveral persons who arrived upon the scone, and thus prevented from dragging its companion and the vehicle over the wharf. The oab was very little damaged by the bolt, and it is estimated that a few shillings will effect repairs. Tho Board of Education meets at 11.30 a.m. ou Thursday next for the consideration of the questions of appointing Bohplarship exatninorß and taking stops to erect a building for the School of Design. Goorge Luke, carriage-builder, of Lower Taranaki-street, has just completed to the order of Mra. Ritson, livery stable proprietress, of Cambridge-terrace, a very beauti-fully-finished waggonette. The workmanship throughout is of the very best order, and does credit to our looal manufacturer. The vehicle, which is conspicuous both for lightness and Btrength, is very roomy, and provides accommodation for nine passengers. The body ia mounted on eliptio springs, and the tore carriage, which is made of iron, is that known as the English typo, with full look, which enables tho vehicle to be turnod in its own length. The painting is in blaok and blue, relieved with white lines. Tho cuehions and back rests aro nicely upholstered in dark green leather. Altogether the carriage refleots great credit on Mr. Luke. Two persons, who were charged in the Magistrate's Court this morning with drnnkenness, were discharged from oustody after being cautioned, in consoquenoo of their having already been detained for some hours in the police cells. Court Pride of Wellington, Juvenile Foresters, held its usual fortnightly meeting at the Foresters' Hall, Tory-street, last night, the chair being occupied by the C.R., Bro. H. S. Woolcot. There was a good attendance of members, and after the usual routine business had been transacted, the Secretary (Bro. J. T. Webber) read the balance-sheet for tho past quarter, whioh j showed that_ tho finances of tho court wero in a vory satisfactory condition, as although there had been the large Bum of £7 17s lOd paid away for sick allowance, there was still a balance of £105 4a 2d. Two new members had been added to the roll during the quarter, and one member had boen transferred to an adult court, leaving the numerical strength of tho court at 34. Songs aud recitations wero contribntod by tho members during the evening, and at a quarter to 9 the C.R. closed the court with the usual ceremony. Mr. Maurice Cronin, who lately sold out of the Crioketers' Arms Hotel, Ingestrestreet, has purchased, through Messrs. Dwan Bros., Carmody's Central Hotel. Palmerston North, which he took possession of yesterday. A company of amateurs styling themselves a " Surprise Party," under the management of Mr. H. Roselle, made their second appearance at Petone last evening, and, despite wind aud rain, succeeded in almost filling the Oddfellows' Hall with an audience who were unsparing in their favours. Tho entertainment waa a unique one, the first part consisting of a selection by the orchestra, an exhibition of statuary, tumbling, &0., by members of the party, songs by Messrs. G. J. C. Parker and DonWallace, an Irish jjg by Mr. Laohlan (encored), a clever blindfold trapeze act by Mr. Percy Smith, and an interview with Professor Lazern, who astonished the audience with feats of legordemain, and was compelled to re-introduce several of his tricks. The most praiseworthy items of the second part were_ selections on bells by a family of accomplished bellringers, a sailor's hornpipe by Mr. A. Hudson, treble trapeze act by Messrs. H. Roselle, W. G. Kingsley, and C. Pearce, and an exhibition on the Roman rings by members of tho Surprise Party. The other items wero songs by Messrs. Parker and Don-Wallace and a selection by the orchestra. Tho entertainment conoluded with the farce " Handy Andy," and this was followed by a danoe. The party had intended returning to town last night, but through an aocident to their vehicle shortly aftec making a start, they wero obliged to remain at Petone all night. The Rev. Father Kirk raises an interesting point in the following lotter addressed to a Wanganui paper :—" Sir,— -At the last meeting of the Education Board an application was received from Mr. M'Carthy, of Manaia, asking tbat his son might hold his scholarship at St. Patrick's College, Wellington. A similar application was made by Mr. M'Govern, who requested that his girl might take out her scholarship at the Convent Superior School, Wanganui. I believe the authorities in Wellington expressed willingness to allow the Government inspection of the work of Mr. M'Carthy's son or others similarly circumstanced at St. Patrick's College ; and, with the consent of the Nuns here, I wrote Mr. Carson, the Chairman of the Education Board, telling him that the Inapector and himself could visit onr school for a like pnrpose. Knowing that boys can avail of their scholarships at the Church of England College, Wanganui, and that the Catholic schools mentioned are very efficient, it was reasonable to expect that a favourable answer would be given to these parents, so deserving of credit for their desire to secure a good education for their children according to their principles. But their praiseworthy desire oannot be gratified if they will have the prize. According to tho Chronicle report of the Board meeting, it was resolved to reply that the Board could not comply with the request, as it would be an infringement of the Education Aot. Can you toll me, sir, how thia is bo ? Ij it not hard ?" Although tho weather was far from being pleasant last night, Mr. Fred. Maccabe'a entertainment in the Theatre Royal was well attended, and those who were there appeared to be thoroughly pleased with the bill-of-fare presented. The various songs nnd sketches were excellent, and Mr. Macca.be came in for a largo amount of applause. The graceful dancing of Mdlle. Minnia was a treat to witnesß, and tho audience were not slow to show their appreciation. The entertainment will be repeated this ovening.

An accident happened at the establish- , ment of Messrs. Compton Broa., builders of ' Boulcott-street, about noon to-day. Inu«ini? a planing machine Mr. Arthur Compton, a member of the firm, had the miafortune to get hia left hand in too close proximity to the knives, and as a result two fingers— the fourth and little one— were severed close to the second joint. Aa may be imagined the accident waß a painful "one, , and being alone in tho shop at the time Mr Compton had no ono to send for assistance. Ultimately a visit waa made to the surgery ° f , D f- Collins and the injured member attended to. The accident will effectnally prevent Mr. Compton resuming work for some time to come. In the Magistrate's Court this morning, before Mr. H. W. Robinaon, R.M. George Lealie was fined £2, and ordered to pay 17a coata, for aesaulting Thomaa Roulaton in Vivian-street on the 25th of September. In default of paying the fine the defendant was ordered to be imprisoned for Bix daya He waa also required to find sureties to keep the peace towards Roulston for two montha, entering into his own recognisance of £10 and a snrety for a Bimilar amount. Mr. Devine appeared in support of the complaint, and Mr. Hutchings acted for the defendant. Jamea Madigan waa required to enter into his own recognisance of £5 to keep the peace for one month towards Mary Maginnity, who complained tbat the defendant had usel inßnlting language towardß hat on the 28th September. Defendant waa also required to pay £1 88 costa. A croas-complaint waa dismissed by the Court. _ Mr. Menteath repreaented Miaa Maginnity, and Mr. Tanner appeared on behalf of Mr. Madigan. An affiliation case brought by Alice Larkins against John 1 Fabian, hotelkeeper, of Greytown, was gone into and dismiased by the Court, following the denial of the defendant that he had ever had improper intercourae with complainant, who waa at ono time a aorrant in hia employ. Mr. Tanner appeared in aupport of the proceedings and Mr. Brown defended. Yesterday afternoon Constable Harnett, of the Lower Hutt, was communicated with in the matter of tho breaking down of the Heretaunga target on tho Lowry Bay-road, and tbat officer ia now endeavouring to find a clue to the perpetrator. We aro informed by a resident that the site on which the target was erected has, ever Binco its being placed there, been viewed aa dangerous to residents on this and the Lowry Bay side of it, as well as by the fishermen who übo tho waters hard by. When tho cavalry are practising, the ehota cross tho road, and those which miaa the target fall into the harbour. Hence it is thought quite possible tbat tho outrage ia a delicate hint to have the target removed. The St. Patrick'a College brasa band ia to play in the College grounds next Sunday afternoon, not Saturday, as announced yesterday. Tho entertainment given on Tuesday last by the pupila of the Thorndon School, aeßißted by several adults, in aid of the Chriatmas Tree, waa practically repeated last eveniupr for the benefit of Mra. Matthews, who had been at great pains in teaching them the Maypole dance, and also how to perform the operetta entitled " A Merry Party." Tho attendance was excellent considering tho state of the weather, and the fund should receivo a satisfactory amount as tho proceeds of tho entertainment. The programme waa the same as on tha previous occasion, except that difforent songs were given by Mra. Parsonß, and Moaara. J. E. Page and F. V. Waters. Tho musical drill was much admired by tha audience, and the operotta was performed even better than it waa last week. Noble Campbell & Co. will sell to-morrow, fruit, produce &c Freeman It. Jackson & Co. will sell to-morrow, at Johnsonville, stock, &c. Laery & Oo.will sell to-morrow, fruit, to.

Dressmaking.— Our head dressmaker has but recently returned from Melbourne and Sydney, and from tho abundant opportunities she has bad of noting the variona fashionable Btylea, most in favour among the leaders of " ton " in these Australian capitals, offers tho folio wing observations to ladioagonerally, and in particular to tho patroneases of the dressmaking department at To Aio House:— Dresbmakin*. — " Black lace dresses aro as popular as ever ; silk sashes, tiod at the sido, are much worn, and China silk is also fashionable." We have a full, complete, and elegant assortment of tlioso, at To Aro House. Dressmaking.— " Plain materials, trimmed with braid and g imp, are in much favour, and the ' Diredoire ' atyle of dress promises to be the rago." In theaepfawi drets fabric* we have an abundant variety, both of Frenoh and English make, with a lovely choice in braids, gimps, and buttons of every desoription and Bhado of colour, at To Aro House. DRESSMAKING.— " Bordered dress materials aro about the newost things out, and are bound from thoir novelty to bo much patronised." There is such an immense choice of theno in our Beason'B importations that thero need be no fear of monotony. Our assortment of these beautiful fabrics, at Te Aro House, is already being muoh appreciated by the ladies of Wellington. Dressmaking.— " A profusion of embroidery is to be the ' correct thing ' thia season, as also bowa of ribbon, finished off with long ends in front." Ladies will find that n«whoro will they obtain bettor variety, or a more excellent aasortment of theao, than at To Aro House. — Adyt.

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RESIGNATION OF MAJOR CAMPBELL., Evening Post, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 86, 8 October 1889

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RESIGNATION OF MAJOR CAMPBELL. Evening Post, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 86, 8 October 1889

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