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Our Woodville Letter.

? (Our Own Correspondent.) Woodville, 9th August. The three men, Maher, Dale, and Dennahey, were brought up on remand on Monday, at the Woodville Courthouso, charged with attempting to burn tho premises of Thomas Gilbart, hotolkeepor, Woodville. A link was wanting in the evidence, ojid the charge was withdrawn. They were then charged with being illegally on the premises of A. Maras, after having been asked to leave, Maher was sentenced to two months' imprisonment, Dale to one month. Dennahey was convicted, and discharged with a reprimand. Mr. Baker, the Conservative candidate, has addressed the eleotors at Herbertville, and reoeived a vote of thanks and confidence. Muoh indignation is felt at Woodville that Mr. Baker did not address Woodville as the centre of population first. It is certainly a slight which, he may be sure, will not increase his popularity. Mr. M'Cardle has finished his tour through the northern portion of the electorate, Ormondville, Danevirke, Norsewood, and Matakukn, and received votes of thanks at each place. At Norsewood. bo stated he would not object to follow a Government including Major Atkinson. It is ourrently reported that Mr. M'Cardle and Mr. Baker have had a conference with the view of arranging for one of the two to retire, but with what result I cannot say, The report, however, is very improbable, as one is a Radical a,nd the other an u'tfa* Conservative. Sir George Grey addressed a large meeting here on Tuesday night. It Wng the firet time he has, addressed a meeting iv Woodvillq, many weretempted, by" the nam» ' , fame of the " Radical Knight," to • M° The Mayor was voted, to, tfee. t* attend, made a short introductory • -»""r, and George went over a. gr<M* \, *?? e nn ce f ol lj, S£ subjects of fqrmer fe*'' . deal of the old and tfapier, refewi*' •3?n? 8 *iA" 0 .? d village aettlei«w» •* at leD fth, l.to,th! settlement »«>- •, scheme and the laud verameat r^als generally of the Gohe, had M comPared with the soheme 2= a • embodied in an Act which he p* v not aucceeded in yet reading the -rst time. His allusions to the Premier were full of acrimony, and he alleged that on the only occasion when an opportunity had offered, the Premier burked the first reading by announcing a ball at Government House, which left the floor of the Chamber without a quorum. He argued that the advantages of his Bill over that of the Government were that it would empower the acquisition of blocks of land near the constructed railways, and near the centres ot population; the payment to be secured by bonds issued by the Government, the settlers to be charged five per oent. interest. The following were answers to questions:—He did not remember Mr. W. C. Smith speaking in favour of the tariff proposals of the Government. He was in favour of railway reform to the extent of reducing the oharge on long distances, so as to give more equal advantages for the transit of produce to the centres and the return of commodities from the same. He believed the avenues leading up to the highest positions of honour and distinction in our law courts should not contain a single barrier to the humblest aspirant if had a good knowledge of English and the law. He believed in the principle of "temale suffrage," and would vote for it on certain conditions, which he could not explain at that late hour. He believed in a land and income tax. He would foster industries by a certain amount of protection. A vote of thanks to the speaker was proposed by Mr. W. W, M'Cardle, who spoke of him in glowing terms as a man whose name would live as long as New Zealand existed, for being associated, with everything for the welfare of the people. This was carried by acclamation. At the conclusion of the meeting three enthusiastic cheers were given for Mr. W. C. Smith the Liberal candidate for Wood vile.

"Rough on Cataeeh." Corrects offensive odors at once. Complete oure of worst ohronio cases; also unequalled as gargle for diphtheria, sore throat, foul breath. "BouaH on Pileb." Why suffer Piles ? Immediate relief and complete cure guaranteed. Ask for Rough on Piles." Sure enw fo^ itohing, protrudng, bleeding, of any'form of Piles. (4 ]

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP18870811.2.27

Bibliographic details

Our Woodville Letter., Evening Post, Volume XXXIV, Issue 36, 11 August 1887

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718

Our Woodville Letter. Evening Post, Volume XXXIV, Issue 36, 11 August 1887

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