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THE CITY ELECTION.

NOMINATION'S FOR THORNDON. The nomination of candidates for the Thorndon Beat in the new Parliamont took place at noon to-day, outside the premises adjoining Mr. Barrett's stxtioner's shop, Charlotte-street. Mr. James Hay, Returnin? Officer, called first upon the proposer and seconder of Mr. Dwan to "do their duty." Mr. Fobwood then ascended the table on the footpath, and proposed Mr. Th Dwan as a fit and prop' r person to represent the Thorndon district in Parliament, and urged thai Mr Dwan had a greater claim on the support of the public than Mr Ley m, iuasmuch as he lad taken greater pains to enlighten the people ou his political viewa than his opponent, who seemed to have trusted too much to his frieuda of the Pre«s. Mr. R. Walker seconded the nomination, amid cheers. Mr. Jas Wallace then came forward and proposed Mr. Levin, whs, he said, had done much to advance Wellington iv every possi-, ble way. During his remarks, Mr. Wallace was graeteJ with groans and other nnseemly interruptions. Mr. Hates seconded the nomination, re* marking that Mr. Levin had taken a great interest in local industries in this city, and through hia efforts the tariff had been so altered that local manufacturers conld now produce articles as cheaply as those brought from beyond seas. Mr. Dwan briefly returned thanks to the electors for the interest they had taken in his candidature. He Baw before him, he said, working men whom he trusted to return him to Parliament. He would rnn the election in no spirit of hostility to his opponent, for whom he had the greatest respect —

(cheers)— but he would carry it out to tho end. Mr. Levin aacendod tho temporary platform amid prolonged (hear*. Ho f aid he had served the electors of Wellington as one of their members for upwarJs of two years, and conld conscientiously say that during that period he had spa-od himself in no respect, but hai endoavonroi to fulfil to the letter the duties oast upon him, and, so far as in him laid, to secure the well-being of those who had entrusted their interests to his care. (Cheers.) He preferred to be judged rather by his past career than by any promises for the future. He had carried out to the letter every pledge he h*d male, and could not charge himself with deviating from the course he had laid down at the last eleO- ' tion. and which hal been endorsed by the electors by their returning him to Parliament by a. large majority. He trusted and believed he had not forfeited their esteem, and that the record of their votes would bear this out. The last Parliament was mark id by two important features—legislation of a sound and advanced character, and measures of liberal reform. The attention of publio men now should be direct d to suoh all-important' questions as opening up the oountry for settlement, and the placing of suitable land within the reach of those fit to occupy it ; the development of natural resouroes and encouragement of manufactures and industries ; the completion of the main trunk lines of railways ; and the amendment of several social laws, many of which required alteration. If tho electors did him the honbnr to return him, they might rely upon it that h:s most earnest care would be given to matter* of this kind. He looked forward hopefully to the futnre, and he would do everything in his power to advance the interests of the couutry, and bring happiness and prosperity to its inhabitants. (Cheers). There being no othor candidate, the Returning Offioar called for a show of hands, when he announced that thero were 57 np fot M*. Dwan, tmd'GO for Mr. Levin. Mr. Lbvin then moved a jrote of thanks to the Returning Officer, which was carried by acclamation. Mr. Dwan having demanded a poll, the Returning Officer stated that a poll would be taken between 9 am. and 6 p.m. on the 9th inst. At the close of the poll, the totals would bo roughly stated, and the offioial declaration made 48 hoars thereafter. ¦ There were about 300 persons at the nomination, and the proceedings were somewhat noisy.

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Bibliographic details

THE CITY ELECTION., Evening Post, Volume XXII, Issue 129, 1 December 1881

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703

THE CITY ELECTION. Evening Post, Volume XXII, Issue 129, 1 December 1881

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