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SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1879.

A morning contemporary has thought proper to garble our statement that the Government intended to introduce legislation next sestion on the management of coal mines, by representing it as an announcement that " die Government do not intend to fulfil the prnqdg) made in the last session that the Regulation of Mines Act. 1874, should be brought iuto general operation, and that they intend to postpone all action until the Assembly meets." This is of course a complete non sequitur, and the assumption is utterly unfounded. It does not follow because Ministers intend to legislate on the subject next session, that therefore they do not intend meanwhile to utilise existing enactments. One would have imagined tbat this could not fail to be plain to the meanest capacity, but to place the matter beyond dispute we may mention that " The Regulation of Mines Act, 1874." was brought into force yesterday in all parts of the Colony by a proclamation, under the hand of his Excellency the Acting-Governor. The proclamation was gazetted last night.

The Wellingtan vital statistics for tho month which expired yesterday are even more unfavourable than those of tho preceding month. The actual number of deaths, it is true, was slightly smaller, beiug 53 as against 57; but, as this is equivalent to nearly 2 per diem, and February has only 28 days to January's-Sl, it is obvious that the proportionate death-rate is heavier in February, for at the same rate January would have had about 59 deaths. Of the 53 which actually occurred, 10 were of adults. Of the 43 deaths of children which were registered, no fewer than 30 were caused by diarrh«3, dysentery, typhoid fever or worms — all diseases known to be directly causable by impure water. This affords additional proof that the City Council was not a day too early in ordering the construction of proper filterbeds.

The vexed question in reference to the receipt of payment by City Councillors for their services as members of the whnrf subcommittee is about to be definitely tested. Messrs. Buckley, Stafford, and Fitzherbert, have received instructions to take legal proceedings against one of the City Councillors to recover the prescribed penalties for the alleged unlawful receipt of this payment. A writ therefore will be issued immediately and the case will be heard on an early day before Mr. Mansford, R M., the Act providing that the case may be tried by a Resident Magistrate. It is certain, however, that the question will have to come jbefore the Supreme Court, as whichever side Mr. Mansford's decision may be unfavorable to will appeal to the higher court. Mr. Greenfield has been selected as the City Councillor who is to become the defendant in thii action.

Our usual Saturday's Supplement published with the present issue of the Etbning Post contains an interesting 1 account of Zululand (from the Bay of Plenty Times), a report of the action for slander brought by '•' The Vagabond " against Joe Thompson, the wellknown bookmaker, some London Gossip (from the Dunedin Star), and a quantity of other selected matter of varied interest. The Zealandia, with the January colonial maHtj arrived at San Francisco on tha 26 th February, one day in advance of Kcr dut date. At a meeting of the shareholders in the New Zealand Times Newspaper Co. held yesterday Mr. W. W. Johnston, M.H.R , in the chair, the directors asked the shareholders to empower them to sell the property of the company if they should deem it advisable to do 80. The shareholders passed a resolution giving the authority asked for. It is rather gratifying to us Wellingtonians, who are justly proud of our city tramway, to learn that Mr. Nancarrow, the Government Inspector of Machinery, who lias just returned from a tour in Europe and America, declares that tue Wellington tramway is in every respect the best he has seen, after travelling on those in Eugland, Scotland, Franco, Belgium, Germany, and America. He asserts that the road is a better one, the cars more <"omf.>rtable, the speed greater — especially up hill — and tbe facilities for stopping more handy than on any other tramway he has seen, while in iio other place yet is steam in such thorough and successful use as a motor tor tramways. This testimony is very valuable and satisfactory. At the Resident Magistrate's Court this morning Thomas Walker, who did not appear was fined 10s, or 48 hours' imprisonment for drunkenness. The New Zealand Sun has dropped in for a good thing in Government advertising. Its issue this week includes a supplement containing the Licensing 1 Court advertisements of nearly every licensing district in the colony. Having nothing better to do, some of the Auckland papers are trying t© bring about a re baptism of New Zealand, and offi-r themselves as sponsors. Tbe new names they suggest are not, however, very attractive, and we suspect that most people would prefer to retain the old uncouth name given by its Dutch discoverer rather than to exchange New Zealand for Oceania, or Southland, or Freeland. As many enquiries are constantly made as to what on earth the "Maori Parliament," now sitting at Auckland, really is, and what its powers and functions, we may explain that the Parliament (or Runartga) is simply a gathering of friendly natives to discuss various questions of general interest to the race. 1 1 is, in fact, a sort of Maori Debating Club on a large scale. Probably its chief use is as a mild safety-valve for national feeling and exuberant eloquence. The City Missionary, Mr. D. Hall, thankfully acknowledges the receipt of the following subscriptions for February:— Mr. G. T., £1; A. and J., ss ; Mr. A. 8., ss; W. G. X., £5: Mrs. F., ss ; J. and R. S , ss; Mrs. B, 2s 6d : Mr. E. T., sj; I*. A J , 10s; Mrs. J. T. T , £lls; Mr. J. E. S., £l Is; A. Friend, 12s; Mr. J. S , ss; Mrs. H., 2s. Mr. Hall would also thank that kind lady, whose name is unknown to him, for a suit of raiment, per Mr. Wilson, tailor. We understand that the whole of the shares required for the extension of the tramway to Newtown have been taken up. The company at present have not power to run to Newtown without the sanction of tbe City Council. Immediate application will be made to the Council, and when the requisite permission is obtained, as no doubt it will be, the work will be commenced at once. The enrs will then run right through from the railway station to tbe Newtown Hotel. The boy Pilraer who was convicted of theft and sentenced to a private flogging at the gaol, and two years in the Burnham Industrial School, received the first portion of his sentence this morning. The flogging was administered with a birch rod of manuka, with which he received 20 strokes " well laid on," causing him to howl lustily. He was sent away to Lyttelton by the Rotorua this afternoon, on his way to Burnbain, where it is to be hoped he will turn over a new leaf. With reference to the letter signed A. Z , in our issue of Monday, Mr. J. Hall, the secretary of the Hutt Pastoral and Agricultural Association, requests us to state that there will be separate paddocks for the cattle and flowers, so that ladies afraid of the cattle may visit the flower show without going neqr them. A strong and large marquee has been engaged for the flowers. The entries for the show this year are more numerous than in any previous year, and it bids fair to be a great success. The railway authorities will run extra trains, and these, as well as the ordinary train?, will stop directly opposite Messrs. Barber's paddocks, in which the show is to be held, for the convenience of visitors. This arrangement should fldd materially to the success of the gfcow. When it was held on the race-course visitors bad either to walk a long distance from the Hutt atatioo or pay hslf-a-crown for a seat in a crowded conveyance, whereas they will now be able to step' dnractiy frojp the train into the sho»r grounds. Wp ffgwt to hear that Constable M'WiUjams, jyho, It may be remembered, had his leg *Wtifeßß WkUfi fifj^yoriag to c J !Ct some *■*•! «te» $?J» .s*• Q*PT*&» Hall in Jrun* t _ "■** « §£fj lame pt>ra jthe aeddent, October, 18v», ~***S)i)9sPffy ?9 ¥* st (? T 4W and is likely to be p. * *^«dee OftQe h§§a of be was examined at the in*. — - ' '

the Armed Constabulary Department by Drs. Grace, Johnston, and Harding, who are to rrport on h!s caso. M'Williams was a very officiant officer, and if it i* found tbat he has been incapacitated for po'ic© duty, the Government will it is said, provide him with the means of earning a livlihood. The case certainly seems to be one calling for the favorable consideration of the authorities. A supplementary mail for Europe and America will be despatched to-morrow morniosr by the s.s. Wellington, at 9 o'clock. The appointment of Mr. David Mitchell Luckie as Government Insurance Commissioner, ia gazetted. l The appointment dates from tbe 27th ult. The resignation of Major Heaphy of that appointment, which he held temporarily, is also gazetted. The appointment of Mr. Thomas Luther Shepherd to be a clerk ot the District Court, Resident Magistrate's Court, Warden's Court, and Licensing Court at Nasaby, vice Mr. H. C. Brewer, promoted to be Deputy- Registrar of the Supreme Court at Duaedin, is gazetted. The Port Darwin line is interrupted north of Farm. There was a very large attendance at the rehearsal last night for the Kaitangata Relief Fond Concert, and a capital practice was held. Tha baud meet for rehearsal at Mr. Bonnington's thls^evening at 7.30. The Waihenga Tollerate, in the Featherston Highway District, has been let to Mr. Bennett for £140 per annum, subject to tbe condition of keeping the bridge in repair. Mr. J. K. Warburton, Accountant to the General Post Office, will go by the mail steamer to San Francisco as mail agent this month. Mr. J. Hoggrard, chief clerk in the Wellington Post Office, was mail agent last month. The alleged juvenile embezzler, Cullimore, whose indictment for this crime caused the detth of his mother from a broken heart, was sent to Christchurch for trial by the Rotorua this afternoon. The ordinary monthly meeting of the Wellington Teachers' Association was held to-day in the Thorndon School. Pre>eot— Messrs. Young (President), Mowbray, Holmes, Lewis, Hurley, Evans, Willis, Watson, Prenderville, Mrs. Willis, Mrs. Wilkinson. It was resolved to ask the Board of Education not to hand over the teachers' salaries to the Local Committees for distribution to the respective teachers without first giving the teachers an opportunity of expressing their views. One new member was admitted. Mr. Young tben read his promised paper on sanitary arrangements in schools, dealing briefly with sites, cleaning, warming, and ventilation of schools. Considerable discussion followed, and some useful hints were dropped by the different speakers. Mr. T. W. Lewis, chief clerk in the Native Office, has been appointed Under Secretary of Native Affairs, in room of Mr. H. T. Clarke, resigned. Mr. Lewis entered the service as Record Clerk in tho Defence Office, under Captain Holt, at tho time of the formation of Department in 1863. He was subsequently appointed Chief Clerk in the Native and Defence Office when these two departments were conjoined in 1870, and he has filled that office since, besides also being' Confidential Secretary to Sir Donald M'Lean and tho Hon. Mr. Sheehan, as Native Ministers. The annual meeting of the Philosophical Society will be held tbis evening at the Museum, at 8 o'clock. The following is the return of patients in the Wellington Hospital during the month of February, 1879 : -Admitted, 23; discharged, 26; died, 2; remaining, 63. A preliminary meeting of persons in favor of Mr. Climie's drainage scheme was held v at the Atheneeum last night; Mr. H. Trueman presiding. It was resolved to send a requisition to the Mayor to convene a public meeting for Monday, 10th March, to enable the burges«es to take into consideration the present position of the drainage question, and to place upon record their opinion as to what scheme of drainage should be adopted for the City of Wellington. The minority on the question of opening the Athenaeum on Sundays do not intend to abide by the decision of the late meeting of members. Archdeacon Stock has given formal notice to the President tbat at the next annual meeting be will move, " That the Athenaeum shall be closed on Sunday." Messrs. T. Kennedy Macdonald & Co., the well -known land auctioneers, have determined to put a stop to the dilatory practices of some of their clients in allowing purchases to be uncompleted for a length of time, and in our advertising columns notify that all those parties who have failed to complete the purchase of those valuable sections on the Terrace, Woolcombe-street, &c, sold at the great land sale on tbe 27th January last, will have their deposits forfeited after noon on Monday next, while all purchasers can, if they desire it, obtain an immediate title. The bash fire, the smoke from which darkened the sky yesterday, has been burning for several days on the ranges at the back of Ohariu. About ltjlO acres, including some valuable bush, were on/fire yesterday, and at one time there was a danger of the firo extending to tha houses in the galley beneath. This caused the settlers some uneasiness, but so far as we can learn no damage to property resulted. The Timaru Herald pleasantly remarks: — "Wellington is not a very easy place for a stranger to find his way about in, for when he is once <tif ' the Beach ' he readily loses bimself among the narrow lanes, alleys, and slums into which the newer parts of the town have been cut up by speculators, and which will one day render tbe city all but uninhabitable. We heard of a plan of describing the whereabouts of a particular house, though, the other day, which is rather good. A visitor from abroad, passing through the Empire City, asked a person whom he met in the street where a well-known resident livod. The answer he received was something like this : — ' Go on straight till you come to tbe next stink but one. Then turn to the left, and keep on that side of the road seventeen stinks, when you will find another turning. Cross over there, and your friend's bouse is just b9yond tbe eighth stink on the right hand side. It has an open drain and a dead dog ia front of it You can't miss it. The slops of the whole street meet just there.' The visitor sent his card by post, and got on board his steamer again as fast as possible." The Wellington Church Chronicle, in its current number, warmly approves the action of St. Paul's Parish in introducing a surpliced choir, and expresses the hope " that tho good example set by St Paul's will be followed by the other city churches." As the chronicle is understood to be edited by one of the church dignitaries, tbis may be taken as an indication of a fresh departure in church matters, with the view to greater decency and order in the conduct of the services. " Uncle Tom's Cabin " again drew a capital house at the Theatre Royal last night. The excellent acting of Un<>le Tom, Littlo Eva, and Topsy, as usual, railed forth warm applause, while the very clever dancing and singinp: of the troupe also met with hearty recognition. The season is now fast drawing to a close, and those who have not already visited tho performance would do well to do so. The entertainment at the Imperial Opera House last night, in aid of the sufferers by the Kaitangata explosion, parsed off very satisfactorily. There was a large attendance, and Mr. N. Thornton's dramatic compaoy, and the amateurs by whom he was assisted, acquitted themselves very creditably. The pieces performed were the operatic drama of " Don Cceaar de Bazan " and the farce of "Kitchen Courtship." A number of representatives of the Southern Provinces arrived by the Tararua yesterday afternoon, and left for Nelson in the Wellington immediately after, for the purpose of competing: at the Rifli Association. They were accompanied by several of the Wellington representatives.

The sale of the suburb of Melrose will be held in the Athenaeum Hall on Monday and Tuesday, the 17th and 18th March. The plans, which are being lithographed, will be distributed in a few days. The property is one of the largest -which has ever been subdivided within such an easy distance of the city. To the business man who desires a residence in a healthy locality, tbis offers special advantages. As the auctioneers, T. Kennedy Macdonald <fc Co., are giving ample notice of the sale, we anticipate that the Atnenseom will be crowded both days. Still waters run deep, and the unpretending virtue of an article is more apt to be genuine than that which flaunts itself in noisy and ostentatious show. The compounds and specifics advertisedin flaming placards and garish posters need such adventitious agencies to foist them into public notice ; but such a preparation, as TldoijPho Wofle's Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps modestly but effectually asserts its own superiority, and takes tbe public patronage by sheer force of its intrinsic merits.— fADvr.]

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SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1879., Evening Post, Volume XVII, Issue 357, 1 March 1879

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SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1879. Evening Post, Volume XVII, Issue 357, 1 March 1879

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