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Evening Post. TUESDAY, MAY 15, 1877.

The ratepayers will to-night, at the public meeting to be held iv the Odd Fellows' Hall, have an opportunity of discussing Mr. Cmmie's drainage scheme. It is proposed, should the meeting be in favor of such a course, to have a poll taken of the ratepayers on some future day, to decide whether Mr. Climie's scheme shall be adopted or not. As we have already shown, this plan of taking a poll has no legal weight or significance. It would 1» right and legal to take a poll of the ratepayers on the question of whether a special loan should lie raised, but in the present case a .sum of £50,000 has l>een already raised for a specific purpose, and it is absurd to take a poll to decide whether it shall be spent on that purpose. The Council already possesses the fullest legal power to spend this money in carrying out a drainage scheme, and would in no way be bound by the result of the poll proposed to be taken. With respect to Mr. Climie's proposals, we think that they are sound in principle, and that his scheme, carefully carried out, and perhaps slightly modified in some of its details, would supply an efficient system of sewerage adequate to meet the present and future requirements of the city. Those who oppose the scheme should be prepared to-night to come forward and state on what grounds they do so. So far as the scheme has yet been discussed and criticised in the newspapers, its opponents have entirely failed to make any good case against it. In fact, the more the scheme is opposed, the>better and stronger it appears. The objections offered to it have mostly been of so vague and general a character as to make them practically worthless. Whenever any specific objection has been made it has been fairly met and answered by Mr. Climie. " The scheme will be ruinously costly — something like £240,000" is the alarmed cry of one objector, to which Mr. Climie replies witli telling effect that two experienced contractors are willing to iio the work for a price less than his estimate. '• There never will be enough of^ water to work the scheme," is the plaint of another doubter, whereupon Mr. Climie supplies facts and figures to show that there is no danger whatever of any deficiency in that way. " The annual cost of working the scheme, including interest and sinking fund, will prove a crushing burden," is the protest of a ratepayer who dreads taxation ; but the obvious reply is that the annual cost of a sewerage system would be far less in the long run than that of removing nightsoil by carts. Some other minor objections have also -been made to the scheme, not one of which remains unanswered. One point of some importance Mr. Climie has disposed of. It has been stated that the arrangement for depositing the sewage on Mr. Crawford's land might not be carried out. We think it probable that it "will not be carried o*ut, simply because it would not pay Mr. Crawford to attempt to utilise sewjige which was so much liquified as that would be which was discharged upon his land. Solid sewage, such as is removed by carts and deposited on land, is an admirable fertiliser, but sewage driven through some miles of pipes by water would not be worth much. Mr. Climie mfeets this difficulty by proposing to carry the sewage out to Lyell's Bay, without any increase on the cost of the original scheme. He adds that two contractors are prepared to undertake this work at a price somewhat under the original estimate of £80,104. The ratepayers, of course, will decide as they think best, but we think there are many rand valid reasons in favor of adopting Climie's scheme, and beginning the work of carrying it out forthwith. We confess to have been somewhat doubtful at first as to the advisability of adopting this scheme, but the lucid and complete manner in which Mr. Climie has combatted objections and cleared up misconceptions has removed those misgivings. In any case, should it be agreed to go on with the scheme, it is advisable to have a gentleman of high professional ability associated with Mr.^CLiMIE, as a consulting engineer, with whom he could confer on all matters of importance as the work progressed. As a reason for proceeding with the scheme, it should not be^forgotten that the £50,000 has been borrowed, and that while it is left unused, the Corporation is paying interest upon it. The money was borrowed for drainage purposes, and it must be spent in that way. There- is just one other so-called argument which will be used by the opponents of this scheme, and that is * " the breeches pocket argument." They will try to set people against the scheme, because it will cost money, and possibly involve extra taxation. We do hope that the ratepayers will take a broad, enlightened view of the question. It is imperatively necessary that Wellington should possess a proper system of sewerage. The comfort, the health, nay, even the lives of the people, in a great measure depend upon obtaining this. The cost of the thing should not therefore prevent people obtaining it. We can bear the nrst cost well enough, while the annual charge of working the system will be far less in the end, as population increases, than that of dealing with the sewage in our present primitive and unscientific way. On these grounds, we trust therefore that the meeting to-night will decide on adopting Mr. Climie's scheme.

The events of the great struggle now going on in the East succeed each other with amazing rapidity. The accounts of the battle of Reni and the victory claimed by the Turks are not yet confirmed. Meantime the Russians have had a minor success at Ibraila, on the banks of the Danube, the guns of that fortification having sunk a Turkish iron-clad wjth 200 men on board. But the most important item in the intelligence is the .defeat of the Russians at Batoum, with an alleged loss of 40,000 men. Batoum is situated in Trans-Caucasia, ou the coast of the Black Sea. When the Russians first entered the Turkish territory a fight occurred at Batoum, in which they (the Russians) were routed with a loss of 800 men. The telegram received to-day is to the effect " that the Turkish official accounts state that a Russian army corps unsuccessfully attacked the entrenchments near Batoum, but were repulsed with loss of 40,000 men." This appears to indicate that there has been a second battle in tHe same place. We have made special enquiry to discover whether 40,000 killed was the exact telegram, but the Press Agency, on telegraphing, has had the same number repeated. So heavy a loss of necessity implies that a large force of Russians was engaged in the attack. The British fleet has meantime been ordered to Port Said. This place is situated at the entrance to the Suez Canal, on the Mediterranean side.

An explanation of last Friday's tidal phenomena apparently is furnished by the brief telegraphic announcement of the destruction of Iquique by an earthquake. This supports the hypothesis we suggested on the day the tidal disturbances occurred, viz., that they were caused by volcanic phenomena similar to those which produced the tidal wave of August, 1868. On that occasion, as will be remembered, fearful earthquakes devastated the West Coast of South America, and destroyed this same place -which we now learn has been destroyed again. Iquique is a small port town in the Peruvian Republic, its geographical position being latitude 20 degrees 14 minutes S.; longitude, 70 degrees 26 minutes W. The population is estimated at from 2000 to 3000. Its exports are chiefly saltpetre, nitrate of soda, and guano, the last being obtained from some small islands in the vicinity, wbich apparently bear the same name, and one of which was completely, and we believe permanently, submerged by the great convulsion of 1868. Assuming that the ocean wave travelled with the same velocity as in 1868, and judging from the time the wave was actually recorded as having reached Sydney— none of the New Zealand accounts being authentic or definite in this respect — Dr. Hector calculates that the earthquake would have occurred at Iquique about 5 p.m. on the 9th inst., allowing for the difference of time. Until, however, some

further particulars shall be received, no theories can be formed which would Ikj more trustworthy than mere conjectural hypotheses.

Mr. Climie yesterday brought a letter, addressed to the Editor of this journal, and made a special request that it should be published to-night. This was at once agreed to. Mr. Climie, after getting that promise, sent a copy of the letter to the New Zealand Times, in which journal it appears this morning. Mr. Climie is, or ought to be, aware that it is an inflexible rule of this journal not to publish letters which have previously appeared in another local paper. Under these circumstances, Mr. Climie's letter is not published in theEvEXixa Post. The formal public unveiling of the memorial bust of the late Dr. Featherston will take place on the 2flth instant. The bust lias been executed hy Signori Del Vescovo and Sani in a stylp which will secure them pfrmanent celebrity in New Zealand. It is now complete, and has been placed on a handsome pedestal, which has )>een fixed on a solid concrete foundation, just within the Museum, facing the main entrancp. The pedestal is a grey marble column, with white marble capital and plinth. Of the bust itself, we have written very fully on several previous occasions, and need only repeat that it is pronounced by all who have seen it to be an admirable and speaking likeness of the late Dr. Featherston. Arrangements for the ceremony of unveiling are now in progress. An inquest, on the body of the late Michael Thomas Connolly, who fell down dead on Lambton Quay yesterday, was held this afternoon before Dr. Johnston, Coronor, and a jury. The evidence of Dr. Diver, who was called in to deceased, and who subsequently made the post mortem examination was to the effect that the cause of death was sanguineous apoplexy, and the jury returned a verdict accordingly. We understand that the Hon. Mr. Ormond has intimated to the committee of the Chamber of Commerce that the reply of the Government to the deputation relative to the proposed new reclamation and railway extension to the Queen's Wharf, and the alternative railway wharf plan, probably will be given towards the end of the present week. The necessary plans and drawings embodying the alternativeschemes are just complete, and will be considered by Ministers in Cabinet, and so soon as a decision is come to, it will be announced in due course to the Chamber. We hope the reply will be a satisfactory one. The admirable plan of Captain Holliday for the permanent improvement of this port, which we described some time back, is now on view at the Chamber of Commerce, having been capitally drawn to scale by Mr. W. C. Chatfield, architect. The plan, it will be remembered, proposes the utilisation, by means of reclamation, of the whole of the shallower portions of the bay, from Pipitea Point round to Meech's baths, without encroaching on the sheltered harbor space, or on the existing wharf or breastwork accommodation — unlike any of the other plans now before the public, — also enabling as many piers as may be required to be run out at right angles with the proposed reclamation breastwork, thus converting the whole of Lambton Harbor into one vast open dock, with o£ miles of berthing. The scheme, although apparently a large one, could be proceeded with in sections as required, without interfering with the unity of the whole. We hope that among the various plans now before the Govei'nment and the Chamber of Commerce, this of Captain Holiday's will not be lost sight of. There was a very fair attendance at the Theatre Royal last night, considering the unpropitious state of the weather. The burlesque, i" Nemesis; or, Not Wisely, but Too Well," was performed very successfully, all the characters being ably sustained. " Nemesis" will be repeated to-night. At a meeting of the Caxton Commemoration Committee, held last night, it was definitely resolved that the dinner should be held on Saturday evening next, at the Oddfellows' Hall. It was reported that the Mayor had consented to take the chair, and that 110 tickets had been sold. Our readers doubtless have noticed in our advertising columns that Mr. Simeon, tailor, Lambton Quay, is offering a reward of £5 for the best poem on his establishment. The competitive poems mast be sent in on or before the 19th instant, as shortly after that date the various effusions will be read publicly in the Theatre Royal. The election of the Hon. William Gisborne as a member of the House of Representatives for the district of Totara, is gazetted. A supplement to last Thursday's Gazette was issued yesterday, it contains only a number of proclamations of no local interest. At a meeting of the Field Naturalists Club, recently held at Dunedin, a Mr. M'Kenzie read a paper descriptive of a trip through the Province of Wellington, giving a graphic description of the country, and exhibiting a large number of specimens of plants collected by him during his tour. He also gave an interesting account of the recent discovery by Mr. J. Mackenzie of a track reducing the distance between the Hutt Valley and the township of Pahautanui to four and a-half miles. There is a very good track, or rather rough road, cut through from Pahautanui to the Hutt, which we have walked over. But it is a good deal longer than four and a-half miles. Editors have had rather "hard lines" of it lately in various parts of the world. A Poverty Bay one came to grief some little time back in a rencontre with a master mariner. Then our Nelson friend was pummelled the other day, and it seems apologised for his sins besides. Again, an unhappy journalist in Germany has been calling the triple alliance "an antediluvian monstrosity," for which he has been prosecuted by the authorities and sentenced to five years' imprisonment. Finally, at Cape Colony a climax has been reached by the tarring and feathering of a Mr. O'Brien, the editor of one of the local journals there. By-and-bye we shall probably hear of an editor having been hanged. We know one or two in whose cases the application of the sus per coll process might be beneficial to the interests of sQciety at large. At the annual meeting of the Australian Mutual Provident Society, recently held in Sydney, reference was made to the late Mr. Joseph Dyer, the Resident Secretary in New Zealand, to whose ability and exertions the remarkable success of the society in New Zealand admittedly is mainly attributable. Professor Smith said the company's secretary in New Zealand had recently died, leaving a wife and nine children unprovided for, except by an insurance of £500, which would be all absorbed in the payment of his debts. The local directors had pressed the claim of this servant on the Central Board, and the Board referred it to the meeting ; but a resolution proposing a grant of £500 was rejected by a large majority. We regret that the shareholders should have shown so poor an appreciation of the valuable services rendered by their deceased officer. A landslip occurred at the back of Mr. J. Ames's Star Hotel, Lambton Quay, yesterday. Fully 100 tons of earth fell, and great difficulty will be experienced in removing it. Mr. Thomas Short, the well-known debt collector", has been appointed bailiff of the Resident Magistrate's Court, vice Mr. Samson resigned. Complaints continually reach us from residents in Oriental Bay and its vicinity that the pleasant sandy beach in that neighborhood is being completely spoiled as a promenade by the constant removal of the sand, leaving the rocky boulders bare. It is alleged that the Corporation employees are great sinners in this respect. We hope to hear ot stringent measures being taken to check this destruction of the only sea-side walk within easy reach of Wellington. The Wellington Chess Club match was continued last evening, when the following games were played: — White v. Wright; Orbell v. Thane; Didsbury v. Willis; and Kirk v. Helyer. The winners were White, Orbell, Didsbury, and Kirk. The following games will be played during the week: Reeves v. Deacon; Brown v. Green ;]Ellaby v. Davies: Hullett v. Gandy. The drawing of the Art Union for Mr. Gully's splendid picture of Milford Sound, now on exhibition at Mr. Jackson's, Lambton Quay, will take place at Coker's Occidental Hotel tomorrow evening at 7 o'clock. Only 7 tickets out of the 110 now remain to be disposed of. Mr. Baker, of " Hibemicon" fame, has arrived in this city, and announces that a drawingroom entertainment entitled "An Evening -with Tom Moore" will be given by his company at the Odd Fellows' Hall on Thursday and Friday next. The brothers Baker established themselves as favorites in Wellington on the occasion of their last visit with their beautiful panorama, and their Irish songs were always received with vociferous applause by their audiences.

The Chief Justice and Judges Johaston, Richmond, Gillies, and Williams, sat in the Court of Appal to-day. The first ca^e heard was that of Alfred Richard Creyke v. Joe Dransfield. Thigjwas an action to recover the sum of £405, the amount of rent alleged to be now due for a half-acre section of land at Lyttelton, which had been leased by the plaintiff to defendant for 1 1 years at an annual rental of £90. It appeared that the defeudant had thrown up his lease on the ground that the plaintiff had made certain representations to him which he afterwards found to be untrue. Four and a half years had now elapsed and the plaintiff sought to recover the rent for that period. Messrs. Macassey and Harper appeared for the plaintiff, and Messrs. Joyce and Chapman for the defendant. The case was proceeding when we went to press. A severe gale from the southward was experienced in this city last night. It set in about 9 p.m., and was" preceded" by four hours of unusually heavy rain, upwards of an inch being registered in that time. The low-lying parts of the city were regularly flooded, especially that part of Lambton Quay opposite the new Government Buildings, where there was quite a sheet of water. Warnings for gales from the eastward and southward were issued on Saturday, and during that night and Sunday heavy gales and rain were felt over the colony. In Wellington though there was little wind the rainfall on Sunday was 1-40 inches. The additional rainfall last night was 1-30 inches, making a total of 2*70 inches since Saturday night. The barometer now is rising and the weather apparently clearing. We are indebted to the Secretary of Customs for the following telegram :: — •' Auckland, 14th May. Secretary op Customs, Wellington. Captain of s.s. Wanaka reports that he noticed heavy breakers about three miles E. by S. off Castle Islet, Bay of Plenty. I. J. Burgess." As a Means op Prevbnting the disagreeable and often dangerous effects produced upon the stomach and bowels by a change of water, or in the use of water containing an infusion of decayed vegetable matter, which so often produces that obstinate form of fever and ague which so frightfully undermines the constitution, Udolpho Wolfe's Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps will bo found absolutely infallible; while in cases of dropsy, gravel obstruction of the kidneys, diseases of the bladder, dyspepsia flatulency of age and infancy, and general debility, it is recommended most emphatically by the most distinguished members of the medical profession. — Advt.

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Evening Post. TUESDAY, MAY 15, 1877., Evening Post, Volume XV, Issue 113, 15 May 1877

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Evening Post. TUESDAY, MAY 15, 1877. Evening Post, Volume XV, Issue 113, 15 May 1877

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