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Evening Post. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1876.

Thb House last night practically decided that the Government may confer the office of Agent-General upon Sir Julius Vogel. It is true that the arguments of ' those who opposed the appointment being made were unanswerable, and that Sir Julius Vogel was justly made the subject of accusations which would have caused any man of independence and public spirit to resolve under no circumstances to accept the office; but, nevertheless, the voting was largely in favor of the proposal of the Government. This result was fully expected. The question was not dealt with ou its merits, but was decided on the" ground that it formed a' part of" a political arrangement, with respect to which a majority of members were pledged to act in a particular way. It would be unprofitable to discuss the debate in detail, because the several speakers had said the same things in previous speeches and on other occasions. It may, however, be remarked that never before in the political history of New Zealand has any public man, by his own act, subjected himself to humiliation so abject as Sir Julius Vogel has , done to secure this appointment. The strictures passed upon his conduct last night owed their terrible severity to their undoubted truth. We do not envy Sir Julius Vogel the possession of the gift which is about to be bestowed upon him. To be told — and with truth — that his conduct with respect to his personal expenses during his ' last mission to England was deeply objectionable, and ,

that the clouds which hung over the subject had never been cleared away; to be told that he was utterly incapable of acting in a subordinate position ; that he had shown himself unfit to work amicably with other people; that he had again and again systematically set the House and his colleagues at defiance ; that he was rash, extravagant, and imprudent; and, finally, that he had made a trade of politics, and was only receiving this appointment in order that he might be enabled to turn himself about in London for a year until he could get into some private business— surely all this must have made Sir Julius Vogel feel grieviousty humiliated, and gone far to mar the anticipated enjoyment of the position which he has so long intrigued for and striven to attain. There is one circumstance connected with this affair which will to a certain extent afford satisfaction to those who desire to see extravagance give place to economy in the administration of public affairs. The Hon. Mr. Bowen, speaking on behalf of the Government, indicated that the office of Agent-General would only be held temporarily by Sir Julius Vogel, and that after he h .d made certain financial arrangements in London, and concluded the negotiations for the inscription of New Zealand stock by the Bank of England, it might then become a question whether arrangements should not be made for cutting down and ultimately abolishing altogether the Agent-General's Department. We have long urged the necessity of this being done, and are of opinion that it should be done at once. There are no arrangements either for the inscription of New Zealand stock, or the raising of further loans, which could not be managed by the Crown Agents for the Colonies, and there is no need to appoint an AgentGeneral at all.! The House, however, has decided otherwise. It was a foregone conclusion that Sir Julius Vogel should be provided for, and so this lucrative billet will be given him, so that he may have the wherewithal to live upon until he gets into business for himself. Far better would it have been for the Colony to have made him a present of a lump sum of money and let him depart from our shores for ever.

Further papers relative to the San Francisco mail service, in continuation oi the former series presented to Parliament on 18th July, , have been laid on the table. The present batch comprises 36 letters and telegrams, with 14 enclosures. Nos. 1 and 2 and their enclosures relate to an application made by the contractors, and acceded to by the two Governments, ! that "the time occupied on the voyage shall I be computed from the hour at which the pilot leaves or takes charge of the vessels at Sydney, Port Chalmers, Auckland, or San Francisco/ but in the event of any needless delay in sailing (the Postmasters-General being the judges as to the necessity of the case), the time to be computed from the hour of the final shipment of the mails, both Governments reserving the right at any time to waive this concession. Nos. 3, 4, and 5 refer to the proposal made, but subsequently withdrawn, as to an increase in the charge for the land transit of the mails across the American continent. Nos. 6, 7, and 8 and their enclosures relate to the grounding of the Australia at Port Chalmers, and " the unfituess of the channel there for ships of her magnitude." Nos. 9to 13 are on the passing of Napier by the City of San Francisco. Captain Waddell's letter to the mail agent on the subject, written on board the City of San Francisco at sea, Cape Kidnapper bearing west, distant six miles, is as follows : — " I regret that the easterly gale and sea, which in the opinion of the coast pilot renders the bar at Napier impassable, makes it my duty to pass Napier without communicating to land mails and passengers and receive the same. My instructions are to call ' weather permitting.' " This is countersigned by the coast pilot. The "mail agent states "it was blowing a strong N.E. gale in Hawke's Bay." Captains Johnson and Edwin append a memorandum which concludes as follows :—: — " It is evident that the latter (the City of San Francisco) must have passed at a long distance off shore, and probably experienced rough weather and sea, which led Capt. Waddell to believe that the same weather prevailed at Napier." Nos. 16 to 20 refer to the grounding of the same steamer at Port Chalmers. Nos. j 29 to 31 relate to the proposed modifications of the eontijft, the final telegram from the Sydney GovernnAt being to the effect that recent changes in the directory of the Pacific Mail Company were likely to improve the management, that there was no chance of the service being allowed to drop, and that if the present contractors wished to drop it, or if their sureties were unwilling to carry on, the Central Pacific Company would take it up. The rest of the correspondence is in reference to the conI tractors' repeated claims for subsidies on account of services which the stesimers Vasco de Gama, Colima, and Cyphrenes did not perform. This claim ultimately has been compromised by the payment of a sum greatly below that demanded. The payment is made with the expressed object of maintaining the entente cordiale between the two Governments and the contractors, and on the condition (to which the contractors agree) that it is accepted in full discharge of all outstanding claims.

We are glad to find that the Licensing Commissioners have at length refused to grant a license to a proposed hotel on the ground " that the house was not wanted in the locality." The applicant in this case is a Mr. Duff, and the house is situated at the corner of Webb and Cuba-streets. The house is a commodious and substantially built one, well adapted for a hotel ; but there was no need whatever for any hotel in the neighborhood, there being four alreadyin Cuba-street, and a considerable ! number in other streets close adjoining. Mr. Duff appears to have thought that if he erected a good house, a license would be granted as a matter of course when applied for. It is well that the Commissioners, by their decision, have now shown that though this may have been the case in - the past, it will not be so in the future. Certainly, the free way in which some licenses have been granted might well lead Mr. Duff to think that he also would get one, and in that respect he may be entitled to some sympathy, seeing that he has spent about £2000 on a building which cannot well be used ibr ; other purposes than a hotel. Still, in a great, measure he has himself to blame. ! A considerable time back some of the inhabitants' in the locality took action to oppose the license being granted, and Mr. Duff had a caution from the Inspector of Police that it would be foolish to build. With the decision of "the Commissioners we entirely agree. The ' house in no way wanted in the locality, ¦ while a considerable number of the residents were most strongly opposed to having it. We trust the Commissioners will >in the future adhere to the. precedent they have laid down, and in* no case grant a new license when it is made quite plain that no additional hotel accommodation is required in the locality where the house is proposed to be established. There are quite enougu public bouses in the ,Te Aro end. of the town without increasing their number.

Rumor had it, this afternoon, that Sir Julius Vogel had resigned his seat for Wanganui, and it was added that it was doubtful whether, ..after last night's debate, he would accept the ; office of. Agent- General. It is not the rase that Sir Julius has resigned his seat. His declension of the office of Agent-General, when he does resign, is rather a remote probability, unless there have been serious changes in the circumstances which first led to hid resignation of the Premiership. We notice with regret the announcement of the death, at' a comparatively early' age of Mr. John White, who will ,be well and kindly remembered as representative of Hokitika in the last Parliament. Mr. White first came to the colony in the employment of the Intercolonial Steamship Company, and when that company was succeeded by the Panama Company, he was appointed *to one of its most important and profitable agencies— that at Hokitika. Mr. White always .took a lively interest in public matters, and was a frequent and smart writer to the Press, professionally or otherwise. His ability and activity brought him prominently to the front, and he was for a number of years active in public service, as -Borough, County, and Provincial Councillor, and as member of the House of Representatives. His peculiar independence prevented him from seeking or, when obtained,holding paid office, and he sacrificed much of his personal interests .in.davotiug himself to the interests of the public- As a member of the House of Representatives, he often lightened the proceedings by, his peculiarly conceived ideas and his earnest mode of Bxpression, and was always listened to with respect and relish. There are many members-in the "present House who must remember hours passed pleasantly in his gefiialeompany. After last session he interested Mmseli less in public matters than he had done previously, anti devoted himself more to his own private interests,' whichlie was recovering, •whdn-Tiis health suddenly broke down and he died: , His enthusiastic exertions in public matters, and his'exeifable* nature,. contributed not a little to his early physical prostration. ' '

! With reference to a statement which has bden ! published, to the eflvct that Mr. Revel], chiS^ | mdssetiger at the General Government Build- . ! ings,*' had kicked the young man Corrad&V«o shot. himself on Monday morning lapt," <j w6 ate 5 requested, on the.part or Mr. Retell, to state that he (Mr.' Revell) used no violence to Corrado, ami that in discharging him he was only acting in accordance with instructions! he had received from his superior officer. When Mr. Revell prevented Corrado seeing the Colonial Secretary, Corrado said to him "You will be sorry for this." It is a curious fact that on I Saturday last Corrado told a friend of his that j he had dreamt he had shot Mr. Revell- and i another mao, and then committed suicide. ' We are informed that Mr. E. T. Gillon met and addressed the Te Aro ratepayers last night, but as we received no previous intimation of the meeting, no representative of this paper was present. The following tenders were received at the Public Works Office, Wellington, for the Mercer and Newcastle contract of the Kaipara to Punui Railway : — Accepted : Daniel Fallon, Auckland, £16,832. Declined : W. H. Topham, Auckland, £22,994 ; John Brett, Auckland, £23,129; A. Watson and Colebrook, Auckland, £25,323 ; A. Smith, Auckland, £27,534; J. Taylor, Auckland, £29,529; R. Dickson, Auckland, £32,635; W.H.Clarke, Newcastle, £32,985; W. Cameron, Auckland, £33,945. It is understood that Detective Farrell left for Dunedio by the Hawea last evening to bring up Charles E. Haughton to Wellington. The unfortunate Italian, Pietro Corrado, who shot himself the day before yesterday, is making excellent progress and there is now every reason to hope that he will recover from his self-inflicted wound. His spirits have been greatly raised by the extraction of the bullet and he expresses an earnest desire to live^ also - much contrition for his act of folly and rashness. It is remarkable that the wound is precisely identical with that received by the Duke of Edinburgh in Sydney. It is not a very valuable testimony to the excellence of the revolver or its maker, who ever he may be, that the ball failed to penetrate through a man's body when fired with the muzzle touching. We should imagine such a weapon would not be very serviceable at 20 or 30 yards. It is a noteworthy fact that the large majority of the foreign immigrants arrive here provided with some kind of fire-arms, revolvers being the favorite weapon. The safety of the lives and limbs of railway workmen is a subject of anxiety with Mr. Reynolds, who has given notice of his intention^to ask the Minister of Public Works whether the Government has any intention of legislating this session with a view to putting a stop to the system adopted by railway contractors of driving workmen in ballast trucks in front of locomotive engines. The Hon. Mr. Peacock is to ask the Government to-day whether they will lay upon the table a copy of instructions, if any were given, to the captain of the Luna to search for the wreck of a vessel reported to be floating, bottom up, off the coast between Wellington and Lyttelton. In the House of Representatives yesterday, the Public Petitions Committee brought up nine reports, one of which was upon Mr. H. W. Farnall's petition for compensation for dismissal from his position as Emigration Agent in the United Kingdom. The committee recommended that £139 be paid to him without any deduction for a contra claim by the General Government. After the report on the petition had been read, Sir Robert Douglas moved the suspension of the Standing Orders for the appointment ot a select committee to inquire into serious charges made by Dr. Buller against Mr. Farnall, but he was recommended by the Speaker to give notice' of his motion, and adopted that course. Just before we went to press yesterday, the Canterbury Football team came to a decision not to proceed homewards by the Hawea but to .wait for the next Union Cos. boat southward, which leaves Wellington on Saturday. As under this new state of affairs there was no necessity to hurry the match, and as, moreover, fully a day's notice was needed to enable the Wairarapa contingent to come in, it was resolved to postpone the match until to-morrow (Thursday) when it will take place, weather permitting. The match will be played at 2.30 p.m. in Mr. Riddiford's paddock, at the Hutt, and, should the weather prove favorable, there will, without doubt, be a large gathering to witness the match, which will be about the best that has ever been played in this province. Special trains will run during the day at reduced rates. The banks have given their employees a half-holiday, and we trust that the leading merchants will follow their example. A dinner will be given to the visiting team at the Panama Hotel in the evening, and tickets can be had of the secretary and members of the committee. The following are the names of the Wellington team :— P. Webb, A. Campbell, G. Campbell, Allison D. Smith, H. Pollen, J. Thompson, W. P. James, R. G. Park, Cowie, L. E. Lee, Allan Bishop, Speed, Hillsden, H. Hickson. Emergency men— Keith, J. Bishop, G. Blackett. Mr. R. J. Duncan held an extensive sale today at Messrs. Turnbull and Co.'s yards, on the reclaimed land, of the plant belonging to the Wairarapa Carrying Company. There was a very large attendance, the bidding was spirited, the prices obtained being satisfactory. The following were the principal lots : — Five teams of six horses each, with waggons and harness, brought respectively £440, £380, £3GO, £340, and £315. A 5-horse team, with waggon and harness, brought £240. Twentythree horses brought from £8 to £23 each, a carriage £37, a coacli £31, a buggy £21, and a timber-wagon £16. The sale was proceeding when we went to press. Mr. R. J. Duncan this day sold by auction, 130 bags maize at 4s 3d ; oats' at 2s 4d : bran, Is 2d. ' Mr. Tonks' steam, Ijay, and corn mill in Manners-street was offered at auction this afternoon by Mr. R. J. Duncan. The property wasput up at £1,500, but the bidding was very languid, and the mill ultimately was bought in by the owner at £1,700. , As an instance of the unprecedented^ bad weather experienced this winter on' the West Coast of the South Island, we may mention that the brigantine Prosperity, a regular trader between Melbourne and Hokitika, has been lying off the latter place for 78 days unable: to discharge her cargo from Melbourne. The bar ,is still quite impracticable. Wiltshire, the unwearied pedestrian, is still slowly progressing with his feat. He seems as plucky as ever in his undertaking, but his pace of walking is rather slow, as his feet are rather sore, but no doubt this will wear away. We are ftlaH -±o gee that be is so. wall- patramaod, especially during the'day time, by the fair sex. W& are informed that there are a great many pay him a visit during the moonlight nights, and keep him company till morning. He looks very well so far, with the exception of being a little lame. The number of miles completed up to 6 o'clock last evenmg was 266. , A meeting of the shareholders in the Empire Gas Company will be held at the Odd Felloes' Hall this evening, at 8 o'clock, when the whole question of the vigorous prosecution, or the relinquishment of the project will be finally decided. We hope that- this question will be settled by the adoption of the former alternative. ' The Star Boating Club announce a ball to be held, at the Provincial -Hall, on the 25th inst., under distinguished patronage, in aid of the club funds. ' ' ' ' The weekly meeting of the Wellington Literary Association was held last evening, in the Willis-street schoolroom. The attendance was good, and four new members were elected. The Hey. Mr. Paterson read a very able and interesting paper on " Poetry and Culture." The rev. gentleman— treated the subject with his usual ability, and received a warm vote of thanks on concluding. Mr. Toxward passed a good night, and was much easier this morning. It is feared that his severe accident will confine him to the house for several months. Two charges of drunkenness were the cases before the Resident Magistrate's Court to-day. In one of the cases the delinquent was an old offender significantly namedTJohn Collins. He had been tour times brought up on a similar charge within twelve months. He was ordered to pay 205., or go to prison for 48 hours. Messrs. M'lntyre and Co.'s s.s. Moa will convey -visitors to and from H.M.S. Nymphe to-morrow afternoon, making 1 two excursions the first at 2 o'clock and the second at 3 o'clock. The fere will be only 2s for adults, and Is for children. Captain Suttie has kindly consented to permit visitors to inspect the ship. This will afford an excellent opportunity to the Wellington citizens of inspecting a. man-of-war without the usual risk of a salt water shower-bath, and we have no doubt the cn ter-

Uprising owners of the Moa will receive large 1 StabliCipatronage. > ¦•"Sfe- ** ' Jwb usual weekly meeting of the Wellington I '^Benevolent Institution was held yesterday ' afternoon, at the Provincial Government Buildings. Present: Mr. J. C. Crawford, RM. (chairman), Right Rev. Bishop Hadfield, Rev. B. W. Harvey, Rev. W. H. West, Messrs. Lipman Levy, D. Lewis, and C. P. Powles. The business consisted merely in ordering payment of various sums in relief of cases of distress. No fre«h subscriptions were received. At the Theatre Royal last night the Hegarty Globe Combination Troupe gave their farewell performance with entire success. This evening Mr. and Mrs. Bates will re-appear in " Don Caesar de Bazan. Peter Bonnell was forwarded to-day to Masterton, where he will probably be brought before the local Court to-morrow, on the charge of forgery, for which he was arrested in Otago, and remanded first to Wellington. The Sydney papers give a long account of a grand choral wedding held in St. Andrew's Cathedral on Saturday week. The bridegroom was a son of the late Dr Bedford, the bride a daughter of Sir Alfred Stephen, G.C.8., K.C.M.G. The service was entirely choral, Tallis' Responses and Maciarren's Service in F being used. The organist, Mr. M. Younger, played Viviani's "March of the Silver Trumpets," and Mendelssohn's •' Wedding March." The cathedral wa3 crowded with spectators. Referring to the intention of Messrs. M'Meckan, Blackwood, and Co. to run a line of steamers from Hobart Town to New Zealand, the Hobart Town Tribune says : — Ifchasalwavs been a matter of surprise to many that the Tasmanian Steam Navigation Company have not looked more closely into the possibility of opening up a trade with New Zealand. Now that a powerful company have taken up the matter, it will no doubt be carried jmt to a success, and we shall not only have qpect bimonthly steam communication with the various New Zealand ports, but we shall also have an additional means once a month of passenger traffic to Victoria. We feel convinced that it only requires a few trips to show the advantages of this route, when a large and paying trade will be the result. The Otago Guardian referring to " Bones," remarks :•— " The man M'Laren, who has been such a pest at public meetings in Dunedin, and who was very properly bundled off the platform neck and crop on' Monday night, has been endeavoring to get a little cheap notoriety by boasting that he has had £100 placed at his disposal for the purpose of defraying the expenses incidental to the getting up of a meeting in the interests of the Central party; and that he has received other favors from the Colonial Government.'' Concerning the notorious Wanganui loafer, John M'Laren, the Otago Daily Times says : — " M'Laren, the great un- washed, evidently either is about to seek legal redress for some of the not very flattering comments of which he has been made the subject of late, or he intends to act on the tv quoqiie principle and libel his assailants in return, and therefore wishes to ascertain how far he may safely go in this direction. He yesterday made application to the Librarian of the Supreme Court Law Library for the loan of ' Starkie on Slander,' a well-known authority on the law of libel. His request was not complied with, so there is nothing left for him under the circumstances but to cast up the inevitable 6s 8d — if he can raise that amount. At a recent meeting of the Otago Harbor Board the following motion, proposed by Mr. M'Kinnon, was carried — " That the Engiueer be instructed to bring up a report at the next meeting on the most favorable means of keeping clear the inner and outer bars at the Heads, either by harrowing, dredging, or otherwise." Mr. Kirton, who was mail agent last month brought a number of specimens of silver ore from San Francisco, and has deposited them in }he Hokitika Museum. Several of the specimens correspond exactly with samples of the ore taken from the Mount Rangitoto mine,' in Westland, and in one instance so similar is the stone to the poorest surface stone of the Mount Rangitoto mine, that it is difficult to distinguish between the two. Reporting the arrival of the Tui with immigrants transhipped at Wellington and Greymouth, the Resident Agent at Jackson's Bay says :—": — " They were all landed in good health, and provided with houses, and are now at work on the Smootl'iwater road. Eleven of them have selected land in Smoothwater Valley, and will move out when houses are provided for them. The two Italian families from Greymouth go to the Okura, where the rest of their countrymen are already located, and engaged in roadmaking. Eight of the single men belonging to the same party are at work on the Haast trfek until the land is open for selection. Mr. Smyth, the surveyor in charge, speaks very highly of the land, both as to extent and quality, the soil being very good, easily cleared, and abounding in cattle feed. The Engineer-in-Chief paid a visit of inspection to the Rimutaka railway contracts last week. The exact object of the visit has not transpired, but the local paper thinks it is only reasonable to assume that delay in prosecuting the works was not remotely connected with it. That was a lucky " hatter " who (according to a correspondent of the Mount Ida Chronicle), while working lately upon a terrace up the Arrow River, got £27 worth of gold in one dish of dirt, one " spec " being six and a-half ounces. In anticipation of Mr. and Mrs. DarrelPs departure from Dunedin, a presentation was made to them in the theatre, in acknowledging which Mr. Darrell said :—": — " As an author I am only a beginner, but so far. thanks to the kindly notices of the Press and the public, my efforts have hitherto been a success. After coming from England, as we anticipate, I think I shall be able to show you a colonial drama worthy of a colonial author and a colonial actor. I may now, while lam on the 'speak,' as they say in America, thank the Press, not only in Dunedin, but also throughout New Zealand, for the kind way they have always treated me. We got a little rubbing down occasionally; perhaps we deserve it — though some people say the Press treats me mildly because I am an old pressman. There is a well-known axiom, ' that familiarity breeds contempt,' and there is a great deal of truth in the statement. However, I thank them throughout the colony for the kindly manner in which they have treated me, which has given me energy and encouragement." "Legal hydropathy " is what a young thief was recently subjected to in Auckland. A short time ago (says the Southern Cross) we published an account of depredations committed by some person on carcases of meat Wlilcir wereiert "nanging" overnight In the slaughter-house. These pilfering games have been carried on up till the other night without any clue to the thief being found. The culprit was caught, and proved to be a boy. He was at once seized, and in the absence of a policeman it became necessary for the slaughterman to constitute himself judge and jury, and do a little lynch law. A large tub stands under water. The young thief received an immediate and thorough baptism, and was sent home to his "ma" without any perquisite, but with a salutary lesson which will have better effect than a month's imprisonment. Society will shortly be convulsed (says a Melbourne correspondent of the Maryborough Advertiser), with a new esclandre. None of the particulars have as yet appeared in the daily papers ; and I only learned them by the accidental misdirection of a letter which fell into my hands, and of which I considered it to be due to you to copy the contents before forwarding it to its proper destination. It seems that one of the habitues of the Collins-street Block, who is conspicuous for the richness of her rinkhat and the dazzling whiteness of her ermine mantle, has secretly engaged herself to be married to the junior attache of a soft goods- house ; and that when this was discovered, her father, who is a retired pawnbroker, and moves in the best circle of society at Toorak, was furious at the prospective mesalliance. In the first outburst of parental wrath, he wrote a letter to the presumptuous suitor, full of bad spelling, bad grammar, bad temper, and bad language, warning the wooer that, if he persevered, he would " shute himn thro the 'edd." The youthful attache threatens to publish this letter, unless the old man withdraws bis opposition; while the fair fiancee vows she will bring disgrace on the family name by eloping with the Footman or the greengrocer, if Paterfamiliar continues unrelenting. The Manawatu Times of Saturday says : — "The new and powerful locomotive with six heavily-laden trucks and two passenger carriages, under the charge of our worthy railway manager, Mr. Abernethy, arrived in Palmerston from Foxton exactly at 1 p.m. yesterday. The train was decorated with flags in honor of the occasion, and a large number of Foxton residents took advantage of the opportunity thus afforded to pay our township a visit.

The strengthening of the bridge across ti^ff Oroua river was completed to time", according^ to the promise of the Resident Engineer^ ~Mr^ J. T. Stewart, and the work is evidently welf: executed, for this heavy engine and train in. passing over caused no perceptible deflection.-. We may now look upon the Foxton-Manawattt^ line as fairly opened; and as another two of three weeks' will it to Feilding, there is no doubt that tu© traffic and freight upon.it will be so largely increased as to prove to the authorities that the proposed reduction of charges will lead to remunerative returns. Mr. George Thomas commenced his great clearing sale of drapery and clothing, consisting of the bankrupt stock of M. L. Marks, on the premises next the Oddfellows' Hall, Lambtou Quay, at 11 o'clock to-day. At the start of the sale, the bidding was rather slow, but towards the afternoon the number of buyers largely increased, and a considerable quantity ot goods was disposed of. The sale will be resumed to-morrow, at 11 o'clock, and we have no doubt will be largely attended, as the stock is large, and the sale without reserve. Of the many returns asked for by Mr. j Murray, one was yestei'day laid on the table of the" House of " Representatives. It is a return showing what salaried officers of the General Government receiving salaries in excess of £-200 a year are permitted to receive remuneration for services outside of their service to the General Government. The application made by the inhabitants of Foxton for a port of entry has been referred to the consideration of Mr. Seed, the Secretary of Customs. We trust that Mr. Seed will recommend that the application be complied with. It is currently rumoured that an elopement from Martou occurred on Monday last, and that the parties were married at Bulls the following day. A Wellington correspondent of the Auckland Evening Star writes : — Mr. D. M. Luckie was I believe, an applicant for the position of sheriff at Auckland, rendered vacant by the death of Colonel Ealneavis. Probably the Government would have given it him, but they had determined to reduce the salary from £650 to £150, and append the duties to some other office. A Kai Iwi native, says the Herald, named Piripi Rapata has recently erected a new native carved house, which is supposed to be the finest iv the island. At the opening ceremony a week or two ago a feast was given, the food being supplied by the trioes of Ngaramu, Ngatiapo, and Wauganui, and consisted of preserved birds, taros, potatoes, fish, eels, and lampreys— there were seventeen troughs of preserved birds. The total amount of money expended in the purchase of provisions was £400, and a further sum of £190 was given away at the feast ; also 27 blankets, 4 pieces of print, 1 kaitaika mat, 2 korai mats, and 2 greenstones. The European food consisted ot flour, sugar, pork, beet, mutton, and spirits, aud the entire management of the feast was entrusted to Haimona Hiroti and Tukaorangi. The interior of the house is decorated with lath-work, diamond work, &c, aud the rafters are embellished with elegant tracery. It is stated that a rich layer of iron ore has been discovered on the beach at Henui. The Taranaki Budget says : — From analysis kindly undertaken by a gentleman in town, a. small quantity of the material was found to contain about GO per cent of iron, and is held together by other matter which it is believed would enable it to be smelted with greater ease than would be possible in the case of the iron saud. It might be worth the whilo of the Titanic Company shareholders to have some of the stuff passed through the furuace at the time Mr. Smith is engaged with his experiments. jEgles, in the Australasian, says :— An esteemed but somewhat eccentric County Court judge tried a case not long ago in which damages were sought for the worrying of sheep. An expert was called by the defendant to prove their value. This witness valued them at 2s Gd per head. "Why," said his Honor, "do you value them at so low a figure ?" "Because, your Honor, they hadn't a tooth in their heads, and were ewes." " What," asked his Honor, "would have been their value if they had had teeth?" " Oh," said the witness, "from 14s to 14s Gd." "Stand down, Sir," said his Honor, with warmth, " or I shall commit you for contempt. Do you mean to tell me that a sheep's teeth are worth 12s, and its carcase only 2s Gd !" And'it really took some time to make him understand how it was that the teeth made the difference.

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Evening Post. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1876., Evening Post, Volume XIV, Issue 58, 6 September 1876

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Evening Post. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1876. Evening Post, Volume XIV, Issue 58, 6 September 1876

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