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Evening Post. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1875.

That the recent contest for the Mayoralty of the City has resulted in the election of Mr. Hutchison, need not cause surprise. Prom the very first a cry. was -raised against Mr. Gisborne that he was brought forward by a particular sect, and- that his election to the Mayoralty was desired as increasing his chances of obtaining a seat in the Assembly. In this matter Mr. Gisborne has been much misrepresented. His utterances on the education* question were twisted and distorted, and unjust prejudices excited against him in the most unscrupulous manner. That Mr. Hutchison should, under such circumstances, receive a large measure of support, was only to be expected. The feeling of the great body of the ratepayers is rightly in favor of a purely secular system of education, aud Mr. Gisborne's opponents contrived to create the unfounded impression that he held strong denominational views. When once a cry of this sort ia raised, whether with justice or the reverse, it is in almost all cases useless to contend against it. Mr. Hutchison's election is, therefore, entirely due to the successful misrepresentation of Mr. Gisborne's views. On hia own merits, he would have stood no chance at all. Comparatively few of the ratepayers know much about. him, and those who do know, readily enough admit that he is very far from being the most suitable person to choose as Mayor of the City. It may be that the result of the election might have been different, had tho friends of Mr. Gisborne' .worked more heartily on his behalf. But in this matter we are not disposed to blame them, because Mr. Gisborne himself took the contest very coolly and easily, and this in some measure discouraged his supporters irorn exerting themselves to the extent they otherwise might' have done. The ratepayers, however, have made their choice, and the fact must be accepted that for the next year Mr. Hutchison will occupy the portion of Chief Magistrate of the City. As such, it is only common justice that he should receive fair and impartial treatment

in his public position, as the elected head of the City Corporation. And this treatment he shall have at our hands. We shall, in the interests of the ratepayers, watch the proceedings of the new Mayor very closely. We sincerely trust that in the discharge of his public duties he may justify the expectations which some people have formed of him. It will- be well, not only for the interests of the City, but for his own sake, that he should do so. By. an accidental combination of circumstances Mr. Hutchison has attained a high and honorable position, and the proof of his fitness to fill it with credit now rests with himself.

The Times this morning attempts to damage the candidature of Mr. Travers, by asserting that he is opposed to a system of secular education, and i " that as his views and the origin of his candidature are the same as in the case of, Mr. Gisborne, he has no chance of election, and had better retire, and leave the field to those candidates who have pronounced definitely that they are jirepared to support a system of State education 5 purely undenominational." It adds :—": — " Even a sudden conversion to secularism in education, of which Mr. Travers is quite capable, would not save him now." We charge the Times in this matter, with making assertions which are deliberately and knowingly false. Mr. Travers was never associated with Mr. Gisborne's candidature at all, and it is simply untrue to assert that he came forward in the interest of any sect. From the very first moment of his candidature, Mr. Travers has in unmistakeable terms declared himself in favor of a system of secular education, aud in his speech at the Odd Fellows' Hall on the 4th December, he uttered his views on this subject with a clearness and precisiou which placed them beyond the possibility of doubt. To convict the Times of wilful misrepresentation, we quote its own report of what Mr. Travers said on that occasion :—: — " The whole duty of the State was to provide secular education. It had no business to teach religion. He did not despise religious instructions, but it ought not to be given in state schools. He would not' oppose the Bible being read in schools, explanatory instruction being given relative to its history, geography, and grammar, but the theological element should be rigidly excluded. (Cheers.) Religion should be left to home teaching, and the State should confine itself to secular education. The State is concerned only with secular education — they have no business to meddle with religious education at all. • But, gentlemen, let it be distinctly understood that I do not despise or in any degree deprecate religious instruction. All I say is that State schools are not the places where, as I understand it, religious instruction should be given. Religious instruction in schools means denomiuationalism. If we allow lay teachers in the schools to go into religious instruction at all it must of necessity degenerate into denomiuationalism, and it does not do for the State to permit that. The State concerns itself only with the secular education of its children." We appeal to that sense of justice and fait- play which all honest men possess, against this attempt to injure Mr. Travers' prospects of election by attributing views to him the very reverse of those he holds. Such conduct - is simply disgraceful, and will only serve to injure, the cause which the Times is prepared to support by any means, however discreditable and unscrupulous.

The Californian mail contract may be said virtually to have collapsed. It haa gone the way of its predecessors, and met with the fate which was to have been anticipated for so imperfect and blundering an arrangement. From the first we have expressed strong disapproval of the San Francisco service in (general, and of this especial contract in particular, and the upshot has justified the soundness of our views. It is possible that this unhappy muddle may be patched, and then foisted anew on the public, but, at the present moment, it is undeniable that the service has broken down, totally and that practically, no valid contract exists. The present position of the affair presents a somewhat novel aspect. The "magnificent steamship Colima," which was expected to cut the Gordian knot by taking this month's mails through, ' has proved her "magnificence" by breaking down twice between San Francisco and Auckland, thus losing several days. Instead therefore of being on her outward voyage from Sydney with the mail, she is still in Auckland harbour undergoing a process of makeshift tinkering, and has never as yet been near Sydney at all. This leads to the following new complication : — First, the only possible steamer which can be despatched from Sydney with this month's mail is the Macgregor, which has just arrived with the last inward mail under the old temporary contract. It is connected that Mr. Hezekiah H. Hall will probably endeavour to charter the Macgregor for the present trip, but as she already has received sailing orders from her owner, it would be extremely doubtful in any case whether her captain would be justified in entering iuto a new arrangement on his own responsibility, and this doubt is increased by the recent refusal of both Governments to recognise the present attempt on the part of the contractors to carry on the service with boats of a class greatly inferior in point both of size and power to those specified in the contract. Under these circumstances, especially considering the antecedents of the contractors' Sydney agent, Mr. Hezekiah Hall, and the fact that the New South Wales Government wholly repudiates this unauthorised arrangement, it is not at all unlikely that the captain of the Macgregor wil refuse to perform this extra trip, in which case there will be no steamer at all from Sydney, unless some local boat, about one-fourth of the minimum permitted size, be chartered by Mr. HalL The case is complicated still further, as it specially affects New Zealand. It was intended to send this month's outward mail by the Cyphrenes to-day, but as the Government very properly has refused to recognise the present makeshift service, it oecame somewhat difficult to arrange on what terms the mail could be sent, without appearing to condgnethe breach of contract. The Solicitor-General advised the Government that the alternative course might be adopted with safety, and it was decided to forward the mail by the Cyphrenes, giving the agents written notice that such proceeding should not prejudice the right of the Government to enforce the penalty of £25,000 for breach of contract. A small mail therefore was made up and despatched by that steamer this atternoon. There is no definite knowledge whether she will meet any boat from Sydney at Kandavau, but she has gone to take her chance. From the very small number of letters posted by this mail, it ia evident that tht public has

wholly lost confidence in the serrice, and that the bulk of this month's English correspondence will be forwarded by the more trustworthy Suez line on Sunday.

The Government have made a mistake in appointing Dr. Giles as Resident Magistrate at Wanganui. Personally the new Resident Magistrate is in every way estimable, and is besides a gentleman of considerable literary acquirements. But an | important centre, of population possessed of large commercial interests such as Wanganui, imperatively requires either that its Resident Magistrate should be a member of tho legal profession, or that a Resident District Court Judge should be appointed. Experience has shown this in a very striking way during the last year" or two. Major Edwards, another layman, by no means gave satisfaction during the period which he occupied the Bench there, and this feeling grew to be so intense as to lead to his removal. When that took place the Government could have allayed all this discontent and met the wishes of the settler 3by appointing a District Judge with a' sphere of action extending from Manawatu to Patea. Any person acquainted with the district in question will at once admit the necessity for this being done. There is an enormouß amount of legal business transacted in Wanganui, and the bankruptcy cases alone almost necessitate the residence of a District Judge." We trust that the Government will take this subject into consideration, and acquiesce in the just and reasonable wish so generally expressed by the settlers in what is one of the most important and advancing districts of the Wellington Province.

Mr. Gisborne has retired from the contest to represent the city in the General Assembly. We regret, but cannot disapprove of his decision. The prejudice which has been raised against him, though undoubtedly unjust, is yet so strong as to render his prospect of election hopeless. That being so, it is a wise and judicious step on his part to avoid the trouble of a contest by which nothing could be gained. We believe that the time will come when the electors, after a calm and dispassionate consideration of Mr.. Gisborne's expressed views, will be inclined to form a -more accurate and just opinion of them than prevails at present. We can find nothing in'his views which justifies the cry that has been raised against him. These views are on record, and it is only by a deliberate perversion, on the part of the Times, of the words which he uttered, that the feeling has been raised which has proved fatal to his candidature.

In his speech to the electors of Napier yesterday, Sir D. M'Lean, after taking credit to the present Government for having inaugurated the public works expatiated uponpolicy, the advantages which had accrued from it, and pointed out that when he took office the native expenditure was at the rate of £350,000 per annum, which the first year he redcued by £200,000. With respect to what institutions should replace the provinces, he thought that the colony should be divided into shires with Shire Councils, consisting of an aggregation of Road Boards. The shires should have control of tne main roads, bridges, and other public worksj -and should have power to borrow on the county rates such sums as were ne- • oeasary. They should, in fact, be the administrative bodies of the colony, legislation being carried on exclusively by the Assembly On the question- of taxation, he said they must accept it as inevitable if they wished to carry out the public improvements inaugurated. He thought a tax should be levied on property, which had acquired a great increase of value owing to the construction of the public works. He hoped such a tax would lead to the cutting up of large holdings into small ones. In regard to the proposed constitutional changes, their great object should be to keep intact the unity' of the colony. He received a vote of confidence at the close of his address.

In order to afford space for news and reports- in the body of the paper, an advertising supplement is published with the present issue of the Evening Post. It contains advertisements, Gazette notices, and some reading matter. Despite the increase to the numbers on the Ratepayers' Roll, it is noteworthy that fewer votes were recorded yesterday in the Mayoralty election than was the case in the previous contest a year ago. Last year Mr Moorhouse polled 1009 and Mr. Dransfield 507, making a \otal of 1516. This year Mr. Hutchison polled 658 and Mr. Gisborne 586, making a total of 1244. This sUbws a decrease in votes recorded of 272. The weekly meeting of the Committee of the Wellington Benevolent Institution was held on Tuesday afternoon. Present: Archdeacon Stock (elected chairman), Bishop Hadfield, Rev. W. H. West, Rev. Father Petit Jean, Rev. S. Morley, R«v. B. W. Harvey* Messrs. J. G. Holdsworth, L. Levy, and the Secretary. Several cases of distress were relieved. The following subscriptions were received : Mr. Urwin, £2 ; Rev. W. H. West, 10s 6d ; H. C, £1 ; Haste to the Rescue Tent (Band of Hope), £1 Is ; Provincial Government grant, £12 103. An important omission has occurred in the Pahautanui Racing Club's programme. By an oversight, the date for closing entries for the various races was omitted, but Mr. Thompson, the Secretary, has now rectified it. It is notified in another column that no entries will be received for the Pahautanui Stakes after the 23rd instant, and for the other races after the 24th. By a typographical error in our issue, of yesterday it was made to appear that Captain Hewitt, R.M., would lecture on the "Polar Regions" at the Lower Hutt on Monday next. To avoid any misunderstanding we have been requested to state that the lecture will be delivered on Tuesday next, the 21st instant. We also omitted to state yesterday that Mr. Igglesden assisted Mr. Beetham in the preparation of the descriptive paintings. The p. s. Manawatu was launched last evening, having been laid up just One month. She has received a thorough overhaul, and has been greatly strengthened with iron Btringers, while her fore-cabin, forecastle, and gallery have been much enlarged. But the principal impovement is the replaoing of the old, inadequate steeple engine, of 30-horse power, by oscillating engines of 50-horse power. This should effect a great increase in the Manawatu's speed, her lines being all that could be desired. Mr. Seager (fiomthe Lion Foundry) and Messrs." Coffey and Dixon have carried out all the alterations, under the direction of Mr. Carman, engineer of the boat, and everything seems to have been done most faithfully and substantially. The Manawatu always has been a favorite boat from her excellent accommodation for her size, and now bids fair to be more popular than ever. She resumes her running to Wanganui tomorrow evening. A meeting was held of residents in CubaBtreet last night, Mr. Barlow in the chair, to consider the proposal to run the tramway along Taraaaki Street. It was considered very desirable that the -course should be along Cuba Street, and a committee was formed to take steps in the matter.

i Dr. Lemon has ascertained that the Cook Strait cable is broken about 14 miles from this end, near the deepest part of the Strait. This may cause much difficulty in effecting repairs. Meanwhile the s.s. Tui has be^n chartered at £25 per day to make if possible two trips daily to and from White's Bay. A marvellous specimen of the bicycle - family has just been imported in the Avalanche by Mr. James Webber, of the Treasury. It is constructed of polished steel throughout, the spokes being wonderfully light and yet immensely Btrong. The larger wheel is nearly sft. in diameter, and the seat is so high as to require ascending by. two steps. There is also a powerful brake, by which the speed can be checked in a very short space. This last is no _ supererogatory precaution, for Mr. Webber, who intends astonishing the people with feats of velocipedestrianism, expresses his iull conviction that he will be able to travel at the rate of IGO miles an honr. We fear he is over sanguine as to the power of his steel steed, but certainly it is by far the best ' specimen ever yet seen in this city. Mr. Webber made his first performance on his Bteel steed yesterday. He got two awful cropprrs in the first three minutes, but ultimately succeeded in making running at an astonishing pace. If he does not break his neck, he will yet do well. At the Theatre Royal last evening, "The Lottery of Life" was produced for the first time in Wellington. The play is a highly sensational one, and is illustrated by some equally sensational scenery, prepared in Mr. Massey's usual excellent style. The principal part was filled by Mr. Wheatleigh, who played "Terry, the Bwell," capitally, and was well supported by the other members of the company. An amusing farce, "The First Night," followed. The same programme will be given to-night. To-morrow evening Mr. Wheatleigh will take his benefit as Myles in the "Colleen Bawn," a part singularly well suited to his especial talent. An actress, new to Wellington, Miss Lizzie Morgan, will make her first appearance on the same occasion. A crowded house may fairly be anticipated with such a combination of attractions. Mr. Gillon addressed the electors of the Wellington Countiy District at Johnsonville last night, and received a vote of thanks. Mr. Wallace addressed the electors- of the Wellington Country District at Karori on Tuesday evening, Mr. C. C. Graham, M.P.C., in the chair. There was a large attendance, and Mr. Wallace, after speaking for nearly two hours, received a unanimous vote of thanks and confidence. The ninth anniversary of the Sydney Street Wesleyan Church waß celebrated last evening by a tea meeting, which went off most successfully, an excellent tea being provided for what was a very good attendance considering the unfavorable weather. Subsequently, the report for the year was read, showing the receipts to have been £123 for the trust funds, and £151 for the circuit fund ; the total being £274. The church debt had been reduced bj £20, and a harmonium had been bought for £30. Several ministers and friends addressed the meeting. The Standard is able authoritatively to state that the Hon. Mr. Waterhouse, though atrongly urged to do bo, positively declines to become a candidate for a seat in the House of Representatives for the Wairarapa district at the ensuing electionThe Rangitikei Advocate gives the following account of the fatal accident already reported by telegram as having occurred to a drayman named George Green, in .the employ of Mr. Pell, the contractor. It appears that Green was driving a dray and two horses from Wanganui to Wangaehu. On reaching the rise on the Wangaehu side of Holder's, Green attempted to pass a heavily loaded wagon that was not proceeding so fast as his horses were accustomed to travel, and while just abreast of the other, the shaft horse stumbled, nearly coming to the ground, and in his endeavor to assist the horse to regain his feet, Green, who was sitting on the dray, was dragged off his seat, and fell directly in front of the wheel, which went over him, causing injuries from which he almost immediately expired. An inquest was held on the body on Friday, when a verdict of accidental death was returued. The Wairarapa Standard says that it received a telegram last Monday from Wanganui in which it was stated thatthere would be a close contest for the two seats there, and that there was every probability of Sir Julius Vogel being defeated, and a moral certainty that Mr. Ballance would be beaten at Rangitikei. Mr. George Thomas has postponed his sale of land, &c, till Saturday, in consequence of the races.

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Bibliographic details

Evening Post. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1875., Evening Post, Volume XII, Issue 144, 16 December 1875

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3,496

Evening Post. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1875. Evening Post, Volume XII, Issue 144, 16 December 1875

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