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Evening Post. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1875.

As only two Candidates have been nominated for the Mayoralty, the choice of the ratepayers is, therefore, now limited to Mr. Gisborne and Mr. Win. Hutchison. Of late the opinions of Mr. Gisbprne on public questions' have been so fully placed before the public, thdfca pretty correct estimate can be formed not only of them, but also of the ability and qualifications of the candidate himself.- , In, common with many of oar fellow-ratepayers, we are of opinion that it would be difficult to find a gentleman better" .qualified to fill the office of Chief Magistrate of the City than Mr. Gisborne. He possesses highpersonal character, a share of ability far above the average, and, in the fullest sense of the word,~is an educated man. Added to this, Mr. Gisborne has hadt. long experience of jpublic life, and is familiar with the methods ,of ¦ transacting public business/ His savoi? ~faire,'hi&ia.ct, ' discrimination, and intuitive knowledge of how conflicting interests and opinions should be dealt with, all combine to show his fitness for the office to which he aspires. We believe. that Mr. Gisborne would be able jtb keep the City Council well in hand, 'and maintain that higher and better tone which has of late characterised its proceedings. In the details of administration, Mr. Gisborne would be perfectly at home ; while ;in those negotiations 4 which sometimes occur, where the Mayor requires to represent and. guard the interests of the city, he would-be essentially"' the right man iv the right place." We think that Mr. Gisborneis honest and straightforward, and that if elected as Mayor, he will earnestly endeavor, in concert with the City Council, to make- the city in municipal matters worthy of its commercial and politipal position in the Colony. In electing Mr. fcrisborhe, the choice of the ratepayers could not well fall upon a more suitable candidate. On the other hand, it is very difficult to discover what qualifications Mr. William Hutchison possesses for the office of Mayor, or on what grounds he can claim the confidence or support of the city ratepayers. Mr. Hutchison is in no sense a public man, with respect to the City of Wellington. He has been less than two years resident in it, and the only means which the ratepayers possess of forming an opinion of his merits are that he started a newspaper, conducted it with neither enterprise -nor ability, and ultimately abandoned an undertaking for which he was manifestly unfitted^ So far, then, the ratepayers only knotf Mr. Hutchison as being a conspicuous failure in journalism, and that knowledge is scarcely likely to furnish an adequate reason why they should entrust the important Interests' of the city to his charge by electing him as Mayor. In truth, this candidature of Mr. William Hutchison is a piece of intolerable impudence and presumption. The man does not possess* a single qualification or recommendation for the -high office which he seeks. From first to last his whole career in this Culoay has proved this- beyond the shadow of a doubt. Whenever he has been by accident placed in a prominent position, his, failure has been alike ignominious and complete. On a leading Auckland journal, his work was of «uch $

nature as to ensure a speedy close of the engagement. At Wanganui, he drivelled on for a few yeara in the Wanganui Chronicle, till that unhappy journal almost j expired through sheer inanition, 1 while of ' his performances in a similar line here the public .have a due appreSßtion./Jlh politics Mr. Hutchison has been very much, worse than useless. As Mayor of Wanganui for a brief period, he evinced an nttec lack of business capacity, and the affairs of that borough were only saved from falling into -inextricable confusion by a change -'_•©£- regime. As a member of the Provincial Council for the Wanganui district, * he > became notable only as an utterly impracticable man, and an obstinate, cratchetty obstructionist. Incapable himself of doing any work which would stand, his chief occupation was to thwart and obstruct theplanfio;fablerlnen,andindoingthishewaß in some measure' successful. As a member of the Education JBpard he has displayed similar qualities, and much of the delay which has attended the transaction of important business in that body is to be attributed to his action. Besides, and above all this, the man, in a public sense, is shifty, prevaricating, and treacherous. He has strong antipathies, and is not over scrupulous as to the means which he employs to gratify them. . It is fortunate in the interests of society, that Mr. Hutchison's power of attacking opponents falls far short of his desire, or otherwise he would be a most dangerous man. In his hick of ability, society finds its protection, 'and his opponents their safety. But in the printed attacks which have issued from his pen, there is a meanness and. malignity which indicate .clearly enough to what lengths he would go, if he' had the brains to execute what his heart has conceived. We should counsel Mr. William Hutchison to abjure public | life in the future. People in this Province | have already taken his measure pretty accurately, and 'Vwill none of him." As a journalist and politician he is played out, and as a man of business he never possessed a single qualification. m In Rangitikei, where he is best known, he polled some twenty votes when he sought to be elected for that district to the General Assembly, and when he goes to the poll here "we have little doubt that his matchless presumption will receive a summary and wellmerited rebuke at the hands of the ratepayers of Wellington City. f • r " i

The arrangements relative to the Californian Mail Service seem to be getting i .deeper and deeper into confusion. The totally unexpected arrival at Auckland yesterday of the Cyphrenes, supposed to be half way aero3s to San Francisco, introduced a new phase of complication. It appears that instead of the Cyphrenes taking the combined mails to San Francisco, she transhipped, them into the Yasco de Gama, which took them forward. The Cyphrenes waited at Fiji four days for the Colima, but, as the latter did not turn up, came on to Auckland, and nextproceeds to-Toft Chalmers to takq this month's outward mail. The New ' Zealand Government very properly Has protested against the employment of such a boat as the Cyphrenes, so greatly below the size and power specified in the contract ; but we hope this protest will not be as on former, occasions, vox et preterea nihil. The penalties prescribed in ;the ; contract ought to be exacted "most rigidly. If the contractors began the service before they were ready, that was their "own fault, and it is not fair that this colony should suffer. It is high time, indeed, that these enterprising" gentlemen who~are so very .ready to undertake a large 'contract, without possessing adequate means of carrying it out, should be taught a severe lesson against thus trifling with the public. j^Agit is, any contractor feelshimself atliberiyto carry out or drop a contract just as it mayliappeh to suit his personal convenience, and considers it a grievous .hardship' -if the Government enforce the penally under which he himself consented tp.j'be bound. The best course would be for'ih'&New Zealand Government to withdraw altogether from the present contract, which has been broken already by the contractors, and, instead of attempting to resume this unlucky Calif ornian service,; to consider the proposals of the P. & 0/ Company in regard to the Suez line, mentioned in another column. It is clear that if, ' as stated, the mail service by that line between, London and Wellington can be reduced to 43 days, and. between London and Sydney to 40 days, it would be from evelry point of view far more advantageous both to New^Jealand! and New South Wales than the illfated San Francisco service, '

In consequence of the continued bad weather, it was decided last 'night by the Stewards of the Jockey Club to postpone the remainder of the .races still further. This morning from, the information received as to the state of the course, it was deemed ! utterly impracticable to resume the races before next week ; and a special meeting of the Stewards was .held, at noon to-day to make prospective .arrangements. /It was resolved! that the remainder of the races should be postponed until the first, fine day next week, and that there Should be an extra day's racing, the. programme of which will appear in to-morrow s issue. With respect to theJMaypralty elections we desire to note the fact that Mr. Gisborne will address the ratepayers to-morrow evening at 8 o, 'clock"/ &fcpS/Lk. Magirinity'a Royal Hotel --He will also? hold a meeting- at Mr. -Valentines-F oresters Arms Hotel on Saturday evening at the same hour. Nothing-further has transpired, in reference' to. the Supposed. boat accident and loss of life, the night before hist The man, ¦ John Camp by name, who was washed, ashore, is still lying at the Hospital in a ~ very weak and confused state. His memory appears very uncertain as to the circumstances under which he received his ducking. He persists in asserting that he went out with two other men in a boat, but [ denies that the boat belonged to the Can- ' terbury, or to any ship, although he cannot explain what boat it was. He says they were pulling, and had no sail set, but the wind and sea were too heavy for them, and. the' boat /capSLzed., He saw : nothing more of his companions, and recollects nothing more until after he was rescued. . The affair is involved in considerable mystery. If the boat had capsized sufficiently near a lee shore for a drunken man to be washed to land, one would have imagined that the gale and sea would drive the boat ashore also. 1 On the other hand,; as no sail was set it is more likely that she was swamped by the seas breaking over" her, and sank with the other two men., Camp's story is so " mixed up that it has been suggested — he and his missing companions being admittedly intoxicated at the time^ — that possibly, the whole occurrence may be the effect of a disordered brain, and that he simply got into the water while drank, and that, on being picked up, his imagination supplied a history of the anterior events which led to his ducking. In any case no information is afforded by his statement as to the, boat from the Canterbury which was washed ashore yesterday.A man named Richard Barnes was taken to the Hospital last night by the constable on duty, with some apparently severe injuries about the head, sustained in falling from the wharf in a state of drunkenness. On being examined, however, the sum total proved to be a slight scalp wound, which was duly dressedy and the patient allowed to sleep himself sober. , ' ~ ¦.* * i An apparently slight accident which occurred about a week ago, has resulted in the death of a man named James Cockton. He was working on the p. a. Manawatu, now on Meech's slip, and stumbling over

some of the materials, fell, his head coming into contact with some iron work. He suffered a good deal of pain from the blow, but -took no particular notice of it utitil some days after,- when he became seriously ill, arid was removed'to theTSCps^tal.^He - complained constantly,^ of his v^ffeado«|id sank rapidly, earj^eptetaay cause' of death being ctmcua-. sion of the brain. His age was 41. " Tipster," in the New Zealand Times j of this morning, is anxious to know "on what grounds*"'fhe stewards- of the Wel- , lington Jockey, Club disqualified CastiUian in the Selling Race?" ' The* evidence .-of " jostling," in its technical sense, was perfectly clear, and according to-tneruleaof "The Victorian Racing Club," by which they were guided, the stewards were perfectly justified in their decision. (The rule on the subject is as follows :—": — " I£ in running for any race one horse shall jostle or cross another, such horse and every horse belonging to the same owner, or in which he shall have a share, running in the Same race, maybe disqualified from winning the race, whether such jostle or cross happened by the swerving of «the horse, or by foul and careless riding of the jockey or otherwise, and where one horse crosses the track of another it is deemed a disqualification, unless he be two clear lengths or more before the horse whose track he crosses, and if such cross or jostle shall be proved to have happened through the foul riding of the jockey, he shall be subject to such punishment as the stewards may think fit to inflict." / Solomons (recently committed for trial on a charge of forgery) was released on bail this morning, his sureties being Messrs. Godfrey Jacobs and Louis Solomons, of Dunedin. That well-known hostelrie, the Prince of ' Wales Hotel,- at the 'top Tory-street, close to the Cricket Ground, has recently been undergoing, extensive alterations, a second story having been added, and various other improvements effected. It is now exceedingly handsome and commodious, and its comforts will, doubtless, be much appreciated by the knights of the willow during the coming season. On the - ground floor are the bar, an unusually large hall, a neat bar-parlor, comfortable commercial and bagatelle-rooms, besides three large-sized and well-furnished bed-rooms. The second story contains 9 bed-rooms — 4 of extra size, — a large' "bath-room, and two very handsomely furnished sitting-rooms — seventeen rooms in aIL The doors, fittings, wainscoat, &c, are of New Zealand hard, wood, French polished. The kitchen is large,- and looks equal to any amount of cricketing dinners. Even the horrible-weather of last night could not daunt the .playgoers, and a very fair audience was present at the third performance of the "Shaughrauri." Distinct ' improvement is visible Bince the first performance, the piece being played closer and more careful attention paid to details. ' The enthusiasm of the audience seemed unabated, and the leading characters were repeatedly recalled, v In all-probability the piece will run for more than a week.

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Bibliographic details

Evening Post. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1875., Evening Post, Volume XII, Issue 138, 9 December 1875

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2,350

Evening Post. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1875. Evening Post, Volume XII, Issue 138, 9 December 1875

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