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DINNER TO THE MAYOR.

A dinner was given by the City Council last evening to his Worship the Mayor, on his retirement from office. It took place at the Panama Hotel, and was catered in most excellent 'style by Mr. W. Light, the proprietor. The chair was occupied by Mr. J. Dransfield, as an ex-Mayor of the the city, Councillors Mills and George taking the vice-chairs. The guests included three of his Excellency's Ministers (Dr. Pollen, Sir Donald M'Lean, and Major Atkinson), his Honor the Superintendent, the members for the city (Messrs. Hunter* and Pearce), and a number of leadiug citizens. After the usual loyal toasts, the Chairman proposed" "The guest of the evening, the Mayor," in terms of high compliment, referring to Mr. Moorhouse's readiness, notwithstanding the high office he had held previously, to come forward and assist ,in carrying -out municipal institution by taking an onerous office which added no honor or dignity to him. Mr. Dransfield concluded by expressing his hope that Mr. Moorhouse, after he had ceased to be Mayor, would' continue to help them by becoming a member of the City Council. The toast was received with the utmost enthusiasm. His Worship the Mayor, in returning thanks, first remarked on the earnest aud pleasant way in which the City Council had worked together for the good' of thecitjr, and expressed his conviction that although they had not made much noise about it, yet the work done was such as to •"be of great ultimate benefit. He had met with the ntmost courtesy and assistance from the Council, and especially from Councillor Dransfield, who, at his earnest entreaty, gave up the idea he had entertained of retiring from the Council. He himself should be happy to give the public his services so far as lay in his power, and so far as they chose to use them, and should be quite willing to enter the Council if it were desired. Mr. Moorhouse then referred to the bills thrown out by the Legislative Council last session, attributing the rejection of those necessary measures for municipal improvement to an extreme fear of the taxgatherer's visits. He then alluded to the important commercial position of Wellington, adopting Mr. Fitzherbert's simile, that it was a sort of "corner shop." Mr. Moorhouse concluded by expressing his approval of the way in which municipal government was worked in Wellington, and by expressing his hope that what he had done daring his Mayoralty might meet with the approval of the ratepayers. (Cheers.) His Worship then rose again and proposed " His Excellency's Ministers," coupling the name of the Hon. Dr. Pollen, remarking that that gentleman had been one of the members of the Legislative Council who had supported their Municipal bills. "

The PrmnEn returned thanks in general terms. Councillor Gillos proposed the health of his Honor the Superintendent-, Mr. Fit*> herbert. His HoNon returned thanks in & very humorous speech. Alluding to the. idea that Superintendents aoon would bo as extinct as the moa, he declared there would be a manifest in' delicacy on his part in giving ready ad* hesion to any such popular bnt delusive hope, and they must pardon him if he bfi' Jonged to a class of incredulous Thomases in this respect. He looked on the present banquet as analogous to a Lord Mayor's feast at home, when it was customary for Ministers of the Crown to be present, and to let drop those expressions which were listened to with such interest as falling from men who held such exalted positions, and whoheld in their discreet hands great secrets of state. Mr. Disraeli aud Mr. Gladstone were alike distinguished for the eXoeedingly clever manner in which they let drop such expressions. If the present company should feel any disappointment at what they had heard from the Premier that evening, it would be extremely 'improper to say so. It should be attributed to the exceeding discretion bo characteristic of the present Ministry. He was sure that if Mr. Disraeli and Mr. Gladstone could Bee how discreetly Ministers at the Antipodes used Brtcb occasions as the present, they would deeply regret that they themselves had not been born colonists. (Laughter and applause). The remaining toasts were "The Ciiy Members," proposed by Councillor Mills and responded to by Mr. Hunter; "The City Councillors," proposed by Mr.|Travers and acknowledged by Councillor George ; "The Officers of the Corporation," proposed by the Mayor, and acknowledged by the City Surveyor and Town Clerk ; "The Press," proposed by Mr. Pearce and acknowledged by Mr. Hutchison ; aud " The Chairman," proposed by his Hon. I the Superintendent, acd suitably acknow* ledged. Mr. W. Bavmond presided ably at the pianoforte during the evening, and played suitable selections. The company broke up soon after 10 p.m.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP18751201.2.11

Bibliographic details

DINNER TO THE MAYOR., Evening Post, Volume XII, Issue 131, 1 December 1875

Word Count
793

DINNER TO THE MAYOR. Evening Post, Volume XII, Issue 131, 1 December 1875

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