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Evening Post. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1874,

TKb question of the site of the new hospital is one of very great interest to the inhabitants of this city, and is now exciting » good deal of attention. By the Act passed last session, the Hospital Trustees are authorised to raiie by the sale or mortgage of the endowments a sum of £12,000 to be spent in tbe erection of the urgently required new building. This sum will be barely sufficient for the purpose. The two sites between which tbe choice of the Trustees seem to rest are the allotment in PipiCea and Hobsoa- streets, on which the present hospital stands, and the reserve at the back of the Terrace, on part of which ihe building until recently occupied as the Grammar School, stands. The Hobsonstreet site consists of two- acres, while at the back of tne Terrace there are eighteen acres available. The Bobson'Street Bite was chosen after careful investigation in the very early days of Wellington as being peculiarly adapted to the purpose, and the -, present building was erected, and opened early in 1852 with a ball to Lieut.Colonel Wynyard on the 1 occasion of bis departure from Wellington, The site is not an exposed one. It commands a pleasant view, » easily drained, the subsoil is light and porous, and, although situated at one end of the city, is readily accessible from all parts. These are the advantages which it it offers, while amongst its disadvantage* the following are urged ; —That its limited extent does not afford sufficient space for the erection of necessary buildings, outbuildings, and recreation grounds ; that it is. being crowded in by houses on all sides ; and that in case of infectious diseases the risk of infection spreading through the city is very great; that there is no opportunity of affording outdoor employment to convalescent patients ; and that ,tfie vicinity of certain public- houses offers temptations which, 'are sometimes yielded to by patients When taking exercise. It is further urged that great inconvenience would be caused daring tbe erection of the new building there, as it most necessarily occupy the exact position of the present one, and it is asked what is to be done with toe patients while the building is in coarse of erection. The extreme value of the site for building, purposes is also urged, and calculations are made as to what it would realise, tbe proceeds of course being avail* . able for the purpose of building with elsewhere. In favor of the Terrace site it is urged that the extent of land would enable .detached . wards, for - the treatment of various classes of complaints, to be erected, and that there would be little or no chance of infection spreading to the city, that there would be ample means of providing healtbfal recreation and exercise for convalescent patients, that the atmosphere is purer than in tbe city, and that there is a magnificent view. On the other hand, there is the high and ragged nature of the ground, and its distance' from the town, A road would cost £1600 to construct, and then for nearly half a mile the gradient would be lin 16. This, it is urged, would be * very serious matter to outpatients, and also involve much suffering in the removal to the hospital of those injured by accident. Clergymen, medical men, and the friends of patients would also find the ascent and distance interfere with their frequent visits. Cabs, which now run front alhparte of the town to the present hospital at the ordinary fare, would have torbe specially engaged and paid for to go to the terrace site. - It is also urged that a site situated on the side of a bill is necessarily* damp and difficult to drain, and also that the air is apt to stagnate and bank up, as it were, against the hill side. The subsoil is said to be a stiff clay, which is not at all what is required on an hospital site. The position is also said to be bleak and exposed, so that throughout a large portion of the year delicate patients could not venture out. The cost of excavating building sites and the want of a good water supply are also urged as objections. In opposition to some of these objections, it is urged that there would, of coarse, be a resident surgeon, that' for ihe benefit of out-patients a dispensary might be established in some part of the City, and the hospital surgeon attend there at stated intervals. It is also alleged that shelter can be grovidad by. higb wind-proof fences and by planting. In a pecuniary point of view, the advocates of the flobgon-street site express an opinion that the eighteen acres Oft the Terrace/ if sold in allotments, would realise nearly, if not quite, 39 much as the two acres in Hobson- street. We have thus endeavoured to place before our readers' 4hV' arguments pro and con in reapedyrf each of the suggested sites. The opinion of the trustees, we believe, originally leaned the Terrace site, while that ef the majority of the gentlemen whom they recently consulted was in favor of the Hobson-streefc site. The balance of public opinion will probably prove in favor of the. retention of the present site. .

v •We are glad to be able to announce that completely satisfactory arrangements have ;been^come to, between tb6 General and Provincial Governments in reference to the expenditure of the £66,000 authorised by -Parliament to be advanced to this province. It will be remembered that the basis on which the grant was agreed to was that the ' province' shduld set apart 80,000 acres of j land for the purpose v£ special settlement On terms 1 agreed on. In accordance with Mr Calcutt's report, 160,000 were reserved from sale to enable the General Government to select the four blocks of 20,000 tores each', A short time ago the Provincial Government addressed the General Government, urging that the selection should be made as soon as possible, and it has since been agreed on between the two parties, at th'e- suggestion of the Provincial Government, that the selection shall be made and the external boundaries surveyed and denned by Mr Heale, Inspector of Survejys,who|in that capacity ia already familiar with the features of the land in question. The oost of this'tiattgh survey is estimated, at £3000 r and when it is made the Provincial Government will proceed with the sectional survey of the block by it« owu officers, the estimated expense being. £22,000.- The £25,000 for surveys will be a first charge against the £66,000 advance, ! and a further sum of £10,000 is to be ap- [ priated to the formation of roads, &c, .within the" special settlement blocks. The i fialancft of £31,000 is, under the act, available for, the works authorised, contingently, by the Provincial Council last session. The following is the proposed expenditure, as suggested by the .Provincial Government, and of which the Minister of Public Works, on behalf of the Colonial Government, has expressed his cordial approval : — Roads — Paraekaretu block, £5000 ; Deviation of West Coast road, £4400 ; Caatlepoint to Alfredtown, £6200 j Masterton to Alfredtown, £4000, Bridges — Tauere, £3500 ; Kaumiogi, £400 ; Rangitikei, £5000 ; and the balance of £3600 is to be devoted to the Wanganui

River works, ia accordance with Mr •<. Blackett'g report. Tenders for all these ; works will probably be called for immediately, and the money will be advanced by : the Colonial Treasury as required. The Minister of Public Works throughout the late negotiations most cordially accepted the proposals of the Provincial authorities with regard to all the points which had to be settled.

*' Subscriber's" letter might involve us in unpleasant consequences if we published it, and the question to which it relates can scarcely be considered of general interest. " Subscriber's" object would be better attained by his communicating the facts to one or other of the insurance agents, who would then take the necessary precautions. At the Resident Magistrate's Court this morning, Daniel Carter, accused of refusing duty on board the Halcione, was discharged with a caution. Clara Payne was fined 5s for drunkenness. Hannah Mendoza, charged with vagrancy, was remanded for a week. Frederic Stagg was charged with assaulting Sophia Anderson, The prosetrix stated that the prisoner asked her to go and have a drink with him, and on her refusal, seized her and tried to detain her forcibly The prisoner related a long story to the effect that he mistook her for another girl. He was fined 20s, with the alternative of 48 hours' imprisonment. Thti civil cases were J. and T, Kebbell v. J, Sawyer, Claim £9 3s 6dL Judgment for amount claimed with costs. I. Plimmer v, T, W. Downes. Claim £20 183 Gil. Judgment for plaintiff in amount claimed and costs. The following 'us an approximate list of the immigrants expected to arrive by the Star of India : — Married couples without children— 6 laborers, 1 carpenter, 1 plasterer, 1 sailtnaker ; married couples with children — G laborers, 10 farm laborers, 1 cooper, 1 brick maker, 1 ploughman, 1 gardener, 2 shepherds, 3 bricklayers, 5 bootmakers, 10 carpenters ; single men — IZ laborers, 5 shepherds, 2 carpenters, 2 bootmakers, 17 farm laborers, 1 groom, 2 plasterers, I tailor, I blacksmith, 6 lads ; single women — II general servants, 3 housemaids, 1 nurse, 1 housekeeper, 3 cooks, 6 girls. The Wellitgton Acclimatisation Society lately has released in this province about 90 pairs of Australian minahs, 40 pairs of Australian magpies, and some quail and pheasants. [Our sage morning contemporary recorded this as Dunedin news ] It is earnestly hoped that these birds will escape molestation by the " larrikin" element, and we may mention for the benefit of these young' gentlemen who, as on former occasions, amuse themselves by catching the birds while still weak from the effects of their imprisonment, that, if they lie in wait for the birds, and catch them, the police will lie in wait and catch them, and they, too, then will have the opportunity of trying how they feel after a term of imprisonment. It is resolved to prosecute rigorously, and press for a severe punishment against all such offenders. The Wellington courage has been proof throughout against the terrors of the Incantation Scene in "Der Freiachutz," which in other places caused considerable alarm and once or twice very nearly a general stampede. Last night the grand fiery climax was even more startling than upual and led many people really to believe that the stage actually was in flames. This, however, was quite iUusive, the fiery composition being so constituted as to become extinguished directly it comes in contact with any substance and it does not possess suffi* cientf heat to ignite anything solid. To-morrow night Mr' Howard Vernon will take his first benefit. The programme is jto comprise Rossini's lovely " Cinderella" ("-Lft' Cenerenfcola"), and the great cave scene in the " Lily of Killarney." Mr Vernon's performance as Mylesin the latter alone would suffice to stamp him as an actor of the first order and a very excellent tenor singer. We have no doubt the house will be a " bumper" one. The weather at Timarn to-day is reported in the telegrams as "considerably swell," So it is here, and we hope this "considerably swell" weather may continue. In consequence of the severity of the weather in Dunedin, the s s. Taranaki was nnable to complete her overhaul ia time to start on her regular date. The Ladybird, therefore, will be substituted for her, and will be due at all ports on the dates on which the Taranaki is announced to arrive and depart, Mr George Thomas' sale of the balance of the stock in Fisher's estate was fairly attended today, but the sale in the forenoon dragged on at a very slow rate, the bidding being spiritless. In the afternoon, there was a considerable improvement. As the sale will be finally concluded tomorrow, without reserve, the competition will no doubt be greater. There was a decided improvement in the price of stock yesterday at the Hutt Market. Mr J. H. Wallace sold cows at £5 10s each ; yearlings and two-year-olds, mixed lot, at £3 10s per head ; horse stock, fair hacks, at £7 to £10 each. We may remind investors, buyers of house and landed property, and speculators, that Mr Duncan will hold his large auction sale of town and country properties, tomorrow, at his sale rooms, at two o'clock. Property in the city, as well as in the country districts, is, we are very glad to be informed, eagerly enquired after, and we have heard of several Biles made privately during the past few days, at greatly increased rates on prices current a few months ago. these circumstances, there is little doubt that at to-morrow's auction, which is nearly all without reserve, business to a considerable extent will be transacted. At the Royal English Opera last night "Der Freiacbufcz" was repeated. This evening Vincent Wallace's pretty opera "Maritana " will be given for the last time, it is announced, in Wellington. Apart from the intrinsic attractions of this opera, which are always sufficient to draw a full bouse, especial interest attaches to its performance to-night in the fact that it will be played for the benefit of Miis Lambert, the leading contralto of the company, being her first benefit in New Zealand. Miss Lambert deservedly has won the public favor not only by her careful and conscientious acting, and her pleasing singing of the music properly within her register, bat even more by the readiness with which she so often undertakes to do her best with music obviously unsuited to a contralto voice, thus saving the necessity of omitting many grand works which could not be performed without a seconda donna. We need not go farther back than "Der Freischutz " to adduce an instance of this. We hope Mils Lambert will have a crowded house to-night. | The Wellington brlnch of the Hibernian Australasian! Catholic Benefit Society was opened on Tuesday evening in due form, Brother Bohan, P.P. of Charleston, being the presiding officer. The principal business tiansacted was the initiation of members

and. the election of officers, which resulted | 1 a3 follows : — President, Brother Hanghton ; Vice-President, Brother Ooogan ; Secretary, Brother Wiggins ; Treasurer, Brother Sheridan ; Warden, Brother Callaghan ; Guardian, Brother Vincent. The next meeting of the branch ia fixed for Wednes'ay, 2iet October, at 7.30 p.m., in ths » ihoolroom attached to St Joseph's Church. Persona wishing to join the society are requested to communicate with the president, vice-president, or secretary. Mr Bathgate lately administered the full penalty of the law on a debtor, who had neglected to satisfy a judgment against him. It was alleged that the defendant had been exceedingly obstinate, having had two fraud summonses against him and a distress warrant. He was sent to prison for 30 days. Major Jackson, MH.B., has addressed his Waikato constituents. His speech was short and unimportant. The following resolution was passed, and he was afterwards entertained at dinner :— " This meeting having heard the address from our representative, Major Jackson, expresses its entire approval of his action in the late session of Parliament. This meeting further approves of the resolutions proposing the abolition of the provinces." The Dunedin Star urges that the maintenance money paid by the creditors foi the support of debtors — 12s per day — being now abolished, that all debtors committed to gaol should be sentenced to hard labor. The public ought not to be charged with their support. An extraordinary accident, says the Otago Times, occurred the other day to a fine littlfi boy, named Thomson, about Bix years of age. He was playing with a copper token, and after retaining it in his mouth for some time he unfortunately swallowed it, A medical gentleman was immediafcelycalled, andhe advised, amongst other things, plenty of exercise. The unlucky youth, however, caught the measles, and he has been confined to his bed for three days. He is bearing up very well under the circumstances, still retaining the penny, and hopes are entertained of bis ultimate recoT cry. The Taranaki Herald says that the latest news from abroad is that Mr Commissioner Parris is about to obtain twelve mouths' leave of absence to visit England, and, in consideration of his long and valuable services to, the colony, that full pay will be given him during his absence. We should scarcely grudge Mr Parris full pay for the term of his natural life, on condition that he never came back to the colony. The colony would be cheaply rid of him at the price, for we have always regarded him as one of the most mischievous members of the most mischievous class of officials in the Civil Service. We mean those of the Native Department. In the notice of a concert lately given at Waipawa, Hawke's Bay province, the reporter says :: — '• Mr Hoilister, of tho Bank of Australasia, was rapturously applauded, the words ' stay with me, my darling stay,' ia ' Love's Request,' being so feelingly expressed that ttie blushes of the listening maidens present betrayed the entrancing power of the vocalist's delineation of the tender passion." The Southern Cross publishes the following telegram from its own correspondent at Akaroa. None of our Southern files say anything of either Mr Macandrew or Mr Reid being in Christchurch, and we doubt the fact : — I have learned that the Superintendent of Otago (Mr Macandrew) and Mr Donald Reid, his secretary, are at present on a visit to Christchurch, with .the- view of- -making preliminary arrangements for agitating^ for a great constitutional change — nothing less than the abolition of all the provinces except two, one for the North Island and one for the South, with the capital of the North Island province at Auckland and that of the South at Akaroa ; the land fund in each island being common property, for each, and to be allocated according to population. This is the report, and I believe you will hear more of it shortly. It is said that this is a move on the part of Otago, in which, it is further added, that the Superintendent of Canterbury is disposed to concur, in order to checkmate the movement which is felt in both of these provinces as likely to extinguish them. Both provinces are determined to die hard, and this is a move to save themselves. , , An Otago paper Btatea that at a banco sitting of the Supreme Court recently, Mr Barton applied for a rule nisi calling upon his Excellency the Governor to show cause why a mandamus should not issue requiring him to give his consent; to a petition of right under the act, for the enforcing of claims against the Crown in New Zealand — the Crown Redress Act, 1871. The rule was made in order to enable Dr O'Donohue, of Port Chalmers, to bring an action against the General Government for the recovery -of £600 or £SdO in connection with the appointments held by him formerly under the Provincial, but now under the General Government. Hi 3 Honor refused the bill, being of opinion that the statute referred to conferred a certain discretionary power upon the Governor. The matter will probably be brought before the Court of Appeal. ' Mr J. L. Gillies' acceptance of the office of Secretary to the Dunedin Harbor Board will not, we ar6 glad to learn, necessitate the resignation of his seat in the House of Representatives, the Board having decided that it will not at present require him to give tip his 'political position, unless it be found to interfere with his duties as secretary. Anyone owning hilly country can obtain heather seed gratuitously from Mr G. Denton, who has a considerable quantity for distribution. A laughable, incident occurred in the Houae of Commons on 28th July, when Mr Brand, on advancing to take the oath and his seat for Stfoud, in the place of Mr Doringfcon, was loudly cheered from the Liberal benches. The formal introduction of the new member to bis father, the Speaker, was performed with due gravity by Sir Erskine May, and was watched with amused interest by the House, the cheering being renewed as the Speaker expressed, in the usual manner, by- a shake of the hand, his gratification at making the new member's acquaintance. . The Auckland Church News states that the eldest eon (Lord Mulgrave) of our new Governor is a .parochial clergyman in the , Church of England, and that ho is of a zealous type, may be inferred from the fact that he was one of the two " raissioners" who recently held a ten days mission in a parish of Derbyshire. The Bishop of Dunedin, in his address to the Diocesan Synod, at its late sitting, expressed very similar views to those embodied in the resolution of the Wellington Synod, which we quoted yesterday, in reference to the proposed reinforcement of the diaconate from the class of those who are engaged in secular pursuits, without requiring as a sine qua non the relinquishment of such occupations. Bishop Neville, however, refers to the customary promotion to the preabyterate, after one year's diaconal probation, as not a matter of course with

the proposed semi-secular deacons, bat as obtainable by such of the number as show especial fitness for the calling. In this form, the proposal appears simply a slight enlargement of the functions usually granted to lay-readers, and a recognition of this quasi lay-readership as a first step towardß the priesthood, which, however, would not be the necessary sequel to the preliminary orders.

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Evening Post. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1874,, Evening Post, Volume X, Issue 198, 8 October 1874

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Evening Post. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1874, Evening Post, Volume X, Issue 198, 8 October 1874

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