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The Evening Post. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1873.

We are afraid 'that stormy times are brewing for Ministers. They- and the various Provincial, authorities do not get on together a J fc"all, ft for 4 Both ' parties seem desirous td act in har- ' mony, somehow or another the system on which public works and;; immigration are conducted, more especially the latter, is so ili-ordered> that wfiiler the spirit of co-operation,, is indeed -willing, thf lk ih*is- fduncj- to b^ too w<uik to bear the constant irritation under which it suffers, aud the consequence is general confusion, . and.anf ; utter failure to meet public wants.

Latterly, also, a good deal of red tap^&ra „ has b&en introduced into the 'Civil Service, wbicli by no means tends to make the machinery go more smoothly. What has occurred in Auckland i 3 an illustration of the pro i gress which has been mad© towards establishing a Circumlocution Office in .New; Zealand. Correspondence has rjeen passing between Mr. Waterhouse on behalf of the Colonial Secretary, and Mr, Gillies, on the subject of immigration, and amongst the matters clGalt with was a proposed special settlement at Victoria Valley, Mongonui. This proposal originated in the Provincial Council, and the resolution embodying it was signed byMr. O'Rorke, in the capacity of Speaker of that body. Now, at the very time Mr. Gillies was corresponding with Mr. Waterhottse on this matter, Mr. O'Rorke, Minister of Lands and Immigration, whose peculiar function it is (if his office mean anything at all) to make arrangements for the settlement of immigrants, was staying in Auckland, yet official etiquette, alias red tape, required the correspondence to pass through the Colonial Secretary's department, and consequently, direct negotiations could not take place between the Superintendent and Mr. O'Eorke. This, we think, is not bad for a young, Colony v , . . . . IBut *red f tai)ei^ni;.is/not the only thing of which the Auckland people have to complain. Out of the 8000 "immigrants which it is proposed to ship from Great Britain for New Zealand' during the ! year 1873, only 800 have been allotted to Auckland, although there is a great dearth of labor there, ' *knd ¦ the Provincial Government contemplated the importation of 2000 immigrants during the year. Considering the magnitude and population of the Province, 800 seems an absurdly/small 'number/ Taut it is impossible to guess upon what basis the Government framed their calculation as 'to the proper distribution of the 8000 immigrants. Mr. Gillies, upon being notified what proportion - 1 had' w been allotted to Auckland, remonstrated with the General -Government on its insufficiency, but to that remonstrance, he recently informed a deputation of citizens who waited on him, no reply had been given. ; neither bad any information been vouchsafed as to the class and condition of immigrants to be selected,, The Auckland . imniigrafcfon, in fact, seems to have got into a thorough mess, and while despatches are travelling to and fro between Auckland and Wellington, agricultural operations are impeded for want of that labor, which might easily be obtained, if the local and general authorities could only agree upon the method by which the work is to be accomplished. The root of the mischief lies in the indefinite position in which the Provincial Gevernments have been placed by the Immigration and Public Works Acts. All the real power is vested in the hands of the General Govem- _ ment,..wjxo.are^compelled, Jiowever, ,to_ ask the advice of the Provincial authorities, but not to follow it. Hence, if the latter venture fco offer advice at variance with the opinions of the Ministry, operations are apt to -pomefto 'a^lrfcajadstiiljTand "the ' blathe is thrown "upon the v Provincial Go--vernments, who are frequently subjected to the further annoyance of "tileitfg their own schemes frustrated, because the General Government will : not carry out their ; views in relation to immigration and public works. A .dual , system, of,- this, kind is obviously both impolitic and expensive. ' The evil mighfc be considerably abated if the red tapeism which r now prevails in the Civil Service' were accompanied by;, a? sound organisation, .and a .rigid attendance of Ministers to the duties of their several departments,.'; Bufc, instead, we find the old practice so;much censured during the continuance of Mr. Fox's administration ~of " Ministers ' rambling here, there, and everywhere, and eachieav- . ing in succession his .department to be looked after by some confrere during his own,afcsence^d'rii'W^llingtori---in full forced *" Even/ the New* Zealand .Herald, i^hicb, since Mr, Oreighton's sadden political conversion, has been a zealdus supporter of the Government, begins to see that matters* are not going on swimmingly, and we *sball conclude by quoting one of its latest utterances : — ; " The fact is, there aeems fo be a general departmental disorganisation, at head- ; qtrarters"itf Wellington, and the business of the country is left to subordinates to manage as best they may, while s Ministers are moving hither and thither on peripatetic * commissions, or playing the role of ambassadors in other colonies, Ik has been said of one administration in our Indian Empire, that? its rale was like that of the Deity— ' unseen, but felt everywhere.' Our administrators seem to show to better advantage 'abroad than at .home, and! their influence is felt but to .obstruct, to irritate, or to wound, In^the 'good old times,' when Ministers were ' passing rich' on £800 a, year— when secretaries, 'private* or " 'confidential/- were" still creations in the f womb, of the future— the business of the l co 4 untry wasr conducted "with regularity, 'System, and dispatch. But 'plenipotentiaries' travelling en suite— big with ' schemes;' projected^ of '> developed — find the every day routine;,, of official life but dull work. The consequences are what we now see— general neglect in the departmental work of Government, vexatious delays," and' ntu.tual between the General and Provincial Governments, While the , memorandammiad campaign proceeds,' the best interests of the colony are sacrificed, to official incapacity on the -one^HaM,' or % } -heartless indifference, still more criminal, on the other."

The Australian papers uu not hold out much prospect of an early termination of the strike of the Newcastle miners, which, originally aiming at the laudable object of reducing the number of hours during which boys should bs required to work in the colleriea, has now assumed a far more complex character, each colliery, apparently, having its own separate dispute, and the men being combined into a firm organisation to prevent the resumption of work until every dispute is settled. A general demand on the part of the men ia that the present mines shall only be worked for 10 hours daily, so as to bring others into operation, which is considered an outrageous interference. An enormous number of vessels are lying idle at Newcastle, waiting for cargoes, and some have returned to Sydney, as there ia no prospect of an immediate cessation of the strike. The enormous price to which coal has risen has caused the Victorians to take steps for the development of the coal beds at Cape Patterson, and a steamer had also been laid on for Hobart Town, to fetch a cargo of Seymour coal. The Argus points out that New Zealand may be looked to as another source of supply, and we hope our Governmnt 1 will not lose the opportunity of utilising the seams lately discovered at Ngakawau, if they can be rendered available at anything like a moderate cost. The latest telegram on the subject of the strike is dated Sydney, 24th January, and is to the following effect : — "Representatives of two coal companies have offered the miners to work two shifts in 11 hours, and to pay them only for the time they are employed ; the price of coal to be raised to 12s, the miners receiving 3d advance ; the hours not to be reduced until January next year. A general meeting of miners was called to consider the above propoaals, but the colliers' delegates appear to have persuaded the men to reject; the masters' offer. There is some likelihood,' however, of work being resumed on Monday."

His Excellency the Governor arrived today by the s,s. Taranaki from Lyttelton. A detachment of the Armed Constabulary, under Captain Stack, formed a guard of honor for him on the wharf, and he was met by Captain Machell, Mr. Hackworth, and several of our respected citizens. The Karori election has terminated in favor of Mr. Wright, who polled 10 votes more than his opponent, Mr. Reading. We congratulate the electors or the district upon their choice. They have got a good man as their representative, and we feel no doubt that Mr. Wright will prove to be a very useful member. At the nomination for Porirua to-day, Messrs. Brandon, J. Taylor, and Lowes, presented themselves as candidates. Election meetings hive been held in different parts of the district during the past few days, active canvassing is going on, and 'it w6uld be hard to say ab present which of the trio will be the rejected one. Mr, N, Valentine has come forward to contest the Hutt ; and Mr. J. H. Wallace is also spoken of as a likely candidate, in which case there will be seven in the field. The nomination takes place tomorrow, at the Mechanics' Institute, Lower Hutt. The nomination for the representation of the Porirua District in the Provincial Council took place to-day, at the Schoolhouse, Kaiwara. The Returning Officer having read the writ, Mr. Hurst briefly proposed and Mr. Cameron seconded Mr. A, de 'B, Brandon as a fit and proper person to represent the district. Dr. Taylor proposed and Mr, Jones seconded Mr. Taylor; and Mr. Chew proposed and Mr. Woodward seconded Mr. Lowes. Theßeturning Officer called on the candidates to address the meeting. Mr. Brandon said he had addressed the electors so often that they knew his opinions well, and he should there--fore imitate the brevity of his proposer. Mr. Taylor spoke about a , coalition formed againsfe him {between the other candidates, and said he came forward as an independent member. He had supported the Government because he believed they had acted for the good of the province, but if they did otheswise he should oppose them. Mr. Lowes said he came forward at the request of a large number of electors, and not with any idea of opposing anyone in particular. He had not spoken to either Mr. Brandon or Mr, Taylor till after the publication of his address. Dr. Taylor made a few remarks on the subject of women having votes under the Highways Act, the same as on education matters. The Returning Officer called for a show of hands, which he declared in favor of Messrs, Brandon and Lowes, A poll was demanded by Mr. Taylor. A meeting of the Star Club was held last evening, when it was decided to leave the choice of a crew for the Interprovincial Race for the boat to Mr. Logan. He has selected Lennox for stroke, Griffiths 2, Werry 3, and Walden 4. This crew wa3 oat practising this morning, and at length we may hope that Wellington has a good chance of taking the honors at the forthcoming contest, A sitting of the Native Land Court will bo held to-morrow. We must request; the person whose duty it 13 to forward the Provincial Gazettes to this office to do so with a little more punctuality. We received a Gazette to-day which was published on Friday last, and, as ft rule, we do not get the Gazette until a day or two after publication, when, of Course, it is of little service to us. A meeting of the Port Nicholson Mining Company was convened for yesterday evening at the Company's offices, but a quorum not attending, it stands convened till to-night, at the same time and place. In the Resident Magistrate's- Court this morning, William Stewart was brought up on remand, charged with a criminal assault upon Rebecca Parnell, a patient in the Karon Lunatic Asylum, Mr, Lrord, who

has been instructed by the Crovrn to 1 prosecute, applied for a remand till Friday, i Mr. Gordon A"llan, for the defence, said the ; prisoner, being unable to obtain bail, adjournments were a hardship ; but on the understanding that the case would really be gone on with on Friday, he offered no objection. It accordingly was remanded till 11 o'clock on the day named. - - There will be a meeting of the United Cricket Club this evening, at their club room, Cuba-street. To err is human, and even the Argus, which seldom commits itself, lately made a mistake when, in announcing the departure of Mr. Vogel for Sydney, it stated that "he was accompanied by Mr. Fox, the other New Zealand delegate." The gentleman alluded to is, we presume, Mr. Vogel'3 private secretary. Poor Mr. Reynolds seems to have been lost sight of altogether. Two of our citizens yesterday endeavored to make arrangements for Chiarini's Circus to play here for a week, and telegraphed a liberal offer to the proprietor in Auckland. As the fact became known, considerable interest was felt in the reply, and the delay which, took place before its receipt served to heighten the excitement. At length those anxiously waiting for the ultimatum espied a telegraph boy approaching, and in the centre of a knot of news seekers they opened the envelope placed in their hands. Whether disgust or amusement ensued, our readers may judge. The message received was — " Can you do peaches at 4s a case ?" The Melbourne Argus, with much justice, we think, censures the home authorities for knighting Mr. Duffy. It is certainly difficult to discover what claims this gentleman has for such a mark of distinction, unless Mr. Gladstone's Government deem that the proper recipients of royal favor are those who have done their be3t to disintegrate her Majesty's dominions. Yet such was the nature of Mr. Duffy's services at home; while in the colony his career is chiefly remarkable on account of bis having formed the most corrupt and profligate Ministry that ever disgraced Australia, The Argus justly remarks that " the Imperial Government has certainly not exercised a wise discrimination in this matter, or even acted with common fairness. It may be that the Secretary of State, or the Prime Minister, has been ' got at' by some of Mr.. Duffy's emissaries — some of the gentlemen who were so successful in getting his praises aung by a portion of the home Press — and so misled. It is to be feared that Imperial distinctions will soon cease to be coveted if they are bestowed in this way. If a few more such knights are made, the title will soon be held in scorn and derision." The Poverty Bay settlers are going in for heavy compensation for losses sustained during the war. One claimant demands £2000. We hope he may get it. The notorious Green Harp claim, at Coromandel, has been sold at auction for £200. We venture to say the purchaser has made a good bargain, for there is no doubt about the auriferous character of the mine, although it may not be a Caledonian. The Canterbury Board of Education have resolved to establish a Training College for teachers. In addition to a system of classification for elementary school teachers, the Board, with the view of encouraging competent teachers who have acquired certificates in the second class, and to stimulate those in the third class, have decided to adopt a system of augmentation grants. If, for instance, a teacher is classed third division, second class, he gets an augmentation grant of £10 per annum. By raising his certificate one degree — second division, second class — he gets £20 per annum, and so on, increasing by £10 for every degree he rises till the first division of the first class is reached, when the augmentation grant amounts to £60. Teachers have thus a double stimulouß towards increased efficiency and more extended acquirements. , By the Tararua we have some further items of intelligence about the Intercolonial Conference. In addition to the delegates previously mentioned, Western Australia will be represented by the Hon. F. P. Barlee, Mr. Parkes has been elected Chairman of the Conference, and Mr. Budge, secretary of the Executive Council of New South Wales, secretary. A Sydney telegram of the 24th ult. states that " the Conference did not sit for the transaction of business until Thursday, when the postal question was discussed, but no resolution was proposed. The Conference met for a few minutes this morning, and then adjourned till Monday. The delegates went for a pic-nic down the bay to-day. They dine with the Governor to-night, and are to go for a picnic up the Zig-Zag Railway tomorrow." We are requested by Captain Moss, of the Central Fire Brigade, to acknowledge the receipt of a donation of a guinea to the funds of the brigade, anonymously sent to him by some person who recognises the trouble and expense which false alarms of fires cause. A general parade of city volunteers is ordered by Lieut. -Colonel Reader for Thursday evening, on the reclaimed land, when the prizes won at the recent Rifle Association meeting will be presented. After the presentation, the monthly inspection will take place. We learn from the Standard that Mr. C. E, Haughton, Under Secretary for Lands and Immigration, visited the Scandinavian Camp on Thursday morning, accompanied by Mr. Munro, C.E. He went as far as the new townsbir of Maurice ville, distant 13 miles from Masterton, and expressed his satisfaction at the site which had been chosen, He was surprised to see the progress which, had been made, and the workmanlike manner in which the roads

fctad been constructed. It is proposed to survey and lay off in the course of the present summer ttvo or three more settlements along tike main line of road, the sites of which will be chosen, by Mr. Halcombe and Mr. Munroe. We are requested to state that on account of the inspection parade on Thursday evening next, the usual drill of the Artillery will not take place this evening. The volunteers competing at the Colonial prize firing will be under the command of Major Gordon. A writer in the Australasian tells a characteristic story of Mr. Wood, formerly of the New Zealand Marine Survey, and late of Fiji : — They say that when Mr. Woods, one of King Cakobau'B Cabinet Ministers, was lately in Sydney, he couceived that he was not treated with the courtesy and ceremony to which his high office entitled him. Mr. Parkea, to whom the complaint wa9 made, delicately hinted that there was, perhaps, some difference between the relative importance and dignity of the offices they respectively occupied. "Of course there is," retorted Woods ; " I am the Prime Minister of a kingdom — you are the Chief Secretary of a dependency 1" The Parnell tunnel, on the Auckland .and Waikato railway, has been completed. It is 1200 feet long. If the rolling stock be in readiness, trains will be running between Auckland and Newmarket (a suburb of the city) in two months' time. The Duke of Edinburgh, it is stated in England, has been strongly pressed to become an admiral, but he firmly declines to j take a flag until he has had some experience as captain in au ironclad ship, and the Sultan is designated as the vessel he is desirous to command. Ib is said that illicit distillation is being earned on in the northern part of the Province of Auckland to a very considerable extent. The many intricate bays, and almost inaccessible coves along the coast, present great facilities for the erection of illicit stills. In many of the country stores and hotels, or •' grog- shops," as they are called, it is reported that spirits are sold which have never paid duty, and that some of the mountain fastnesses, generally in the vicinity of navigable rivers, are perfect nests of distilleries. The Agent-General of Victoria, writing by last mail, states that it is the opinion of the consulting engineers that the fall in iron will not much affect the railway contracts, as good rails are still in great demand, and cannot be obtained in large quantities at any greatly reduced rates. The following gossip about the Duke of Edinburgh is from the European Mail : — "The other day the Duke of Edinburgh visited Gemunden, where the Royal family of Hanover i 3 at present residing. A ccording to Galignani the journey of his Royal Highness is said to have a matrimonial object, and the approaching betrothal of the English prince with a daughter of King George is .spoken of. If the news of that alliance should be verified, the marriage would be a family one, for the reigning • dynasty of Great Britain is of the House of Hanover. The union would, at the same time, be a political one, for the Prince is presumptive heir to the Duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, just as the Guelr.h dynasty has rights of succession to the Duchy ot Brunswick. King George has two daughters — Princess Frederica, born in 1848 ; and Princess Maria, born in 1859." A public meeting was held in Auckland on the 28th ult., for the purpose of considering the edncation rate and its beating upon the working classes. A resolution condemning the Act was negatived, and the opinion of the meeting seemed to be in favor of giving the Act a fair trial, although no definite decision was arrived at. The Auckland people are envying " Happy Hawke's Bay," and " Thrice happy Scandinavians." They say that in. Auckland people pay an uniform tax for education, but it is not so in Hawke's Bay, In that province a household rate has been imposed, but while the original settlers must pay, a beneficent General Government steps in, erects Bchoolhouses, and defrays all the cost of education of the Scandinavian children "out of general revenue," for the first year. Thanks, no doubt, to the indefatigable'Sttperintendent of Hawke's Bay, Mr. Ormond. There is a great deal of agitation going on in Auckland about the proposed ThamesWaikato railway, and the General Government are being pressed to have a preliminary survey of the live made before next session of the General Assembly, Tenders for the construction of 13 miles of the Nelson and Foxhill railway are called for in the Nekou papers. Some months ago, Mr. W. A. Murray, M.H.R., sent a sample of tussock grasa from Otago to Melbourne, for the purpose of testing its qualities as a paper-making material. The Daily Times states that it is found to make an excellent brown Wrapping paper j and the opinion of those who have tested it is that it will also work nicely into news, common printing, &c, as it takes a good colour, and is easily bleached. Samples of the paper manufactured from the tussock grass have been forwarded to Mr. Murray, and after inspection we can safely say that they fully bear out the favorable opinion expressed by the experienced gentleman who teated the material. The high charges for freight will probably render it impossible to profitably work the tussock grasß into paper either in Australia or England ; bo it is to be hoped that some one will be found en-, terprising enough to establish the necessary works in the colony, and by utilising the excellent material which exists in such abundance, secure the bonus of £2,500 offered by the General Government for the first 100 tons of paper manufactured in • New Zealand.

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The Evening Post. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1873., Evening Post, Volume VIII, Issue 310, 4 February 1873

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The Evening Post. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1873. Evening Post, Volume VIII, Issue 310, 4 February 1873

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