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The Evening Post. FRIDAY, JULY ,17, 1868.

The Lyttelton Times states, on good authority, that Mr. Stafford has repeatedly telegraphed within the last few days to several absent members of the General Assembly, likely to support him in the coming struggle, to lose no time in making their appearance in Wellington and assuming their seats. The struggle alluded to by the Times will probably be contingent upon the debate which will, without doubt, be raised by Mr. Stafford's introduction of a bill intituled au Act for better' securing the Freedom and Independence of Parliament. The Premier, we perceive, has given notice that he would move for leave to bring in the bill on the 22nd instant, and in all probability he will find himself in good need of support on the occasion. The act in question is presumed to he another step in the direction of clipping still further the wings of the oiiponents of the present Ministry, by causing their ranks to be thinned of its ablest members. It is supposed to contain clauses, which, were the bill passed, would prechide the holder of any Provincial appointment from becoming eligible for the reju'eseutation of any district of the colony. It is needless t > observe that little or no hope can possibly be entertained by the Government to carry such measure. But as it is obviously an attempt to inflict a keen and decisive Woav Upon the expected Opposition, there is little |

doubt but that determined efforts will be made by the Ministry to carry the measure through, t The merits and demerits of the question have long been discussed and affirmed, and we do not propose to enter enter into the pros and cons of the absurd farce thus enacted in order to obtain still greater monopoly of power over the House. The introduction of the bill, however, has brought to our mind a question to which we would gladly receive a satisfactory answer. Everybody, doubtless, remembers how a death blow w.aq given to that very " freedom and independence of Parliament, '* during the last session, which our Premier is now pietending to be suddenly so anxious to uphold. It is yet fresh upon the memory of every one, how, subsequent to the passing of the Public Debts Bill — one of the most iniquitous measures ever brought before the Assembly — several Government servants holding seats in the Upper House were forced to resign, their seats under the threat of losing their appointments. Those unfortunate gentlemen, ignorant of any feelings of toadyism in the exercise of their duties, had thought proper to follow the dictum of their conscience* never for one moment dreaming that they might be made to suffer thereby. One exception to the rule remains, however, to prove that Mr. Stafford did not mean, as a general measure, the abolition of paid offi" cers from the Upper House, which he partially intimated on that occasion. We refer to Mr. Domett, the head of the Crown Lands Department, whom we find is far from inactive in the discharge of his duties in the Council, and who, we presume, will undoubtedly have the good sense to profit by the results which, follow the action of his late unfortunate brethren ; and, when the occasion presents itself, will possibly " vote straight," in the Ministerial sense of the term. Coupling with those facts the "packing" of the Upper House, as attempted lately by the addition of the new members called to replace the last batch of honorables who Were made to resign, we are entirely p$ a loss to conceive how, without a blush, or in all seriousness, the Premier can with any confidence bring forth before the country this act, "to better secure the independence of Parliament."

The Government have chartered the s.s. Waipara in order to convey troops from Napier to Poverty Bay, or to any portion of the coast where the escaped prisoners from the Chatham Island are likely to be found. H.M. s.s. llosario lefb for Napier and the North to-day, She proceeds under orders to assist in the matter of the escaped prisoners from the Chathams. In the House of Representatives, th' s afternoon, Mr. W. T. Travers asked the Government "whether »j>y further news had been received in connection with the escape of the Maori prisoners from the Chatham Island, and what steps had been taken in the matter. The Defence Minister and Mr, Stafford in reply stated that no further news had been received, but that the Government did not intend moving in the matter until further news was received by the chartered veasel, the Rifleman, which was expected hourly from the Ohathains. The llosario had been ordered on special service, but not to the Chathams. The s.s. Alhambra, from "Melbourne, via the South, arrived in port this afternoon at 2 p.m. The Rev. P. Hay-Maxwell acknowledges the receipt of £10 from Messrs. J. and T. Kebble, in aid of the Benevolent Society. The revenue received at the Customs today amounted to £167 3s lOd. The towns of Greymouth and of Timaru, have been gazetted boroughs under the Municipal Corporations Act, 1867. J. H., Campbell, Esq., of Waiapu, has been appointed a Commissioner to investigate claims preferred by settlers residing fn Hawke's Bay and Auckland, for losses iiicurred during the war. Major Edwards received, some time' ago, a similar appointment with regard to the Wauganui District We understand that the handsome sum of £30 has been handed to the Benevolent Society, as the result of the "benefit given in tiie Oddfellows^ Hall on Monday night by the Wellington Amateur Serenaders. It ig with much pleasure we announce that these gentlemen will in a short time give a similar entertainment, and we trust meet with the same kind support from a benevolent public. The departure of Major You Tempsky's constables from Hamilton, in the Waikato, apjjears to have catised much sorrow amongst j the inhabitants of that locality. The Hamilton correspondent of the Southern* Cross pathetically deplore the exit of the gallant mounted constabulary, and expresses the feelings of the community on the subject in the following affecting terms :—": — " The mounted constabiilary have left us, and the township, in consequence, has lost a great deal of its military appearance ; but their absence is more felt by the hotel-keepers and their over-confiding creditors. I think their inspector should strongly insist on the absolute necessity of his men paying the various claims that arc uoav owing by them, as the credit of the corps ia at stake. A warrant for the arrest of Walter M'Donnell, was received at the police ofiico, Wellington, on Wednesday last, from the Auckland Bench, charging him with having stolen a quantity of jewellery. This even. ¦

ing Sergeant Monaghan cleverly captured the offender in a lodging-house in town, and placed him in the watchhouse. The Southern News say that a man named Charles Webb, suffering from severe injuries to the head, Was admitted into the Hospital on the afternoon of the 26th. The poor fellow, who was working alone in the Waikivi Bush, states that in the fore part of the day he was struck down by a fallen tree, and became insensible, until providentially discovered by Mr. Royds, who promptly procured a dray to convey him to town. How he escaped with life it is difficult to imagine, when the nature and extent of the injuries are taken into consideration. One side of his head is severely bruised, while the other is frightfully lacerated. One deep wound on the temple divides an artery, from which extensive hemorrhage has taken place. The Oamaru Times, of the 23rd ult., says : — The recent wet weather has caused the prevalence of hooping-cough and different forms of bronchial affection. Indeed, not only scores of children, but even many grown up persons have suffered acutely from hoop-ing-cough, but as we have for the last three or four days experienced fine bright days, with clear frosty nights, it is to be hoped that with this more favorable weather, the health of the community will improve. The "tub and bucket factory" started some months ago near Mount Eden, in Auckland, has proved a losing speculation to its enterprising proprietors. The plant and factory was placed under the hammer by the mortgagees a few days ago, and realised only £700. On this subject the Southern Cross says :—": — " We hope the future working of this branch of local industry may be more successful than it has hitherto been. The demand for such articles throughout the colony is great, and we see no reason why the manufactures of this province should not enter into competition with those of the United States." An important decision, affecting those having dealings with Colonial Steam Navigation Companies, was given by Mr. Justice Ward in Napier a few days ago. In a case of damages claimed by a shipper of sheep against the Captain of the Ahuriri steamer for negligence as a carrier, the plaintiff obtained a verdict, whereupon the learned Judge alluded to the provisions of the company's bills of lading, " that the company are not answerable for loss occasioned by negligence," as being contrary to the Carriers' Act of 1865, and null and void to all intents and purposes. The Ajtcklund News s.oys that some passengers by the Star of the South, which arrived lately from Napier, went ashore on their way up at Port Charles ; and, as gold prospecting is the order of the day, tkey took some quartz from a hill near the beach, and brought it to Auckland. It has since been pronounced to contain gold. Pleuvo-pueumonia seems to be on the in, crease in Canterbury. Thi-ee or four heads of cattle are destroyed weekly on that portion of the plain called the Maori Run. The Hawke's Bay Provincial Council have passed an Education Act during the session just terminated, imposing a rate of £1 pothouse on all buildings, for educational purposes. The funds thus raised will be administered by the Government. A company of farmers, woollen manufacturers, and others, are preparing to leave Montgomeryshire, in North Wales, for the Province of Canterbury. A gentleman has been sent out as the agent of the company, for the purpose of selecting a block of and of several thousand acres, in order that all the families who form the company, may, on arrival, locate themselves at once. The land likely to be selected is that situate south of the Rangitata, following up the Opihi and Tengawai rivers, where some tracts of the iincst land in Canterbury is to be found. It is stated in the Hawke's Bay papers that Hugh Carleton, Esq., who represents the Bay of Islands district in the House of Representatives, is dangerously ill, and that even if he should ever attend the Assembly again, he certainly will not make an appearance there during the earlier part of the session. The Canterbury 2>eople appear unanimous in condemning the course pursued by the railway contractors, Messrs. Holmes and Co., in auddeidy stopping all traffic on the line under their temporary control. Our latest Canterbury files furnish us with the intelligence that the Provincial Council have voted the sum asked for by the Government in order to meet the claims of Messrs. Holmes and Co. The general feeling of the House was that the matter should be left entirely in the hands of the Executive. Now that the contractors have stopx^ed the traffic, there is no doubt but that a speedy and jjositive termination to the contest can be calculated upon with certainty, and that the Government will enter upon possession of the railway as soon as the works are completed. Somehow or other, niany large contracts in New Zealand seem to be doomed to create litigation of one kind or another. The dearth of coals in the Auckland market seems to continue. It appears that there is as great a scarcity of that necessary article as ever, and that it can hardly be got for the steamcrd plying from Auckland to the Thames, With difficulty 40 tuns were got for the Rangalira from the Lorenzu Sabinc, and the sailing of the steamer

was delayed, owing partly to the fact that the men refused to work at the coaling, uness they were paid extra. Seven thousand bushels of oats were exported from Timaru for Melbourne, a few days ago, by the Ocean Wave. The Invercargillites seem rather sore at the promised visit of the Defence Minister being omitted. Great preparations were made to receive that gentleman ; the daily parade of the local volunteers were taking place in order to "practice" for the occasion. No mention, however, is made by our eourplaining correspondent as to whether a salute of seven guns was to be accorded to the gallant Colonel, as done in Otago. A Canterbury paper states that it is calculated that dogs to the value of about £200, have been wilfully poisoned during the last few days in Christchurch and the neighbourhood. Thomas Brown Bain, late clerk to the Resident Magistrate's Court, (Jhristchureh, was again brought before the local Bench, having been removed from the Lunatic Asylum and committed to trial on two charges of embezzlement. Bail was taken of two sureties of £250 each. Mr. Moorhouse defended the prisoner. The Lyttehon Times says that the Resident Magistrate, before whom and Mr. E. J. Wakefield, the case was heard, gave evidence for the prosecution. A correspondent from Dunedin states that it was rumoured there that the real motive for which the member for Oaniaru, Mr. W. D. Murison, has resigned his seat in the House of Representatives, is his well-known objection to the native element which has been introduced in that House, and which in more ways than one is found most objectionable by the hon. member. The West Coast Times, of the 22nd ult., relates the following incident, which forms a very good pendent to the alleged snake discovery in Auckland, some time ago. It says : — When the cutter Hope was last month lying at anchor off Okarita, a monstrous shark came alongside the little vessel, and seizing a. porpoise which was hanging over the boivs made off with the prize. The length of the monster of the deep was variously estimated by those on board the Hope, the least estimate being 24 feet, and the highest SO feet. The appearance of the huge denizen of the deep is said to have been most terrific, and its cavernous mouth was thickly studded with shar|) serrated teeth. Mr. Barn", M.H.R., who was a passenger, made several attenrpts to harpoon this shark, but the iron would not penetrate his thick skin, but bent like wire. Here is one of the few instances yet on recoi'd in New Zealand of a real " logger's wedding," as wananted hy an Auckland contemporary, it apjjears that Mr. W. Sadgrove, one of the lucky shareholders of the Middle Star claim at the Thames, was married at St. James Church this morning, and quite a grand wedding it was, reminding one of the ' ' Diggers' weddings" one used to see in Victoria some ten or a dozen years ago, only that the thing was done in better taste here. A carriage drawn by four grej's, followed by two other carriages, each drawn by a pair of the like animals, turned out in Quick's well known first-rate style, conveyed the happy couple and their friends to the Church, where quite a crowd was gathered to see the arrival, as well as to watch their departure at the conclusion of the marriage ceremony. No doubt if the prosperity of the Thames continues, we shall see an increase in the number of these gay weddings, which are (or were, at all events, in Melbourne some years ago), the almost inevitable result of doing well at the diggings. There appears to be little or no life at the present moment at Stewart's Island. The bays of this windy locality were alive some time ago with the activity and enterprise created by extensive steam saw mills, fisheries, &c. From what a correspondent says of the Island, things there appear rather dull this winter. The fishing station has been abandoned ; both the saw mills have been shut up ; and the few miners that were prospecting the beaches have left. Gold was j found in various places on the IsL-iud some | time ago, but it appears that nothing payable has turned up. The population of the Switzer's diggings in Otago has decreased considerably lately, and the prospects of the field are somewhat gloomy. There are 100 Chinese on the field out of 600 inhabitants. Our Auckland friends are not, evidently, used to Chinamen, but, no doubt, will soon find that in gold lield districts the sight of the " ehildron of the sun" is "a good sight for sore eyes." The Southern Cross thus expresses the lively interest created by the first appearance of John Chinaman in Auckland : — " We saw a somewhat remarkable object in Queen-street on Saturday last, viz., a leal live Celestial in full flower. We are aware that two solitary degenerate Mongolians have for some time past condescended to sojourn in our midst, but, destitute alike of pigtail or baggy breeches, they have failed to command any admiration whatever. The individual we here bring so prominently before our readers was a perfect specimen of the sons of the Flowery Land, revelling in all the pride and glory of expansive robes, bioad brimmer, and lengthy hirsute appendage. Ho was the observed of all observers, and he knew it. He walked along the street hands in pocket with an air of saucy nonchalance, evidently

despising the barbarians who elbowed him on the pavement. The arrival of a bona fide John Chinaman and the imposition (we intend no double entendre) of a poll tax, form a curious and highly suggestive coincidence, and that we should have already received a first instalment of this niueh-:ibused, but often highly useful, class of bipeds affords a powerful proof of the attractions of the Thames gold fields. The new importation is, we hear, from Hokitika, where, to use a commercial phrase, ' the market is well supplied.'" The Haioke's Bay Herald does not quite appreciate the expensive luxury of telegraphic intelligence, and in order to make "both ends meet," informs its patrons that in consequence of the opening of the line the subj scription to the Herald will, from the commencement of the current quarter, be raised from 2os to 33s per annum.

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Post. FRIDAY, JULY ,17, 1868., Evening Post, Volume IV, Issue 132, 17 July 1868

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The Evening Post. FRIDAY, JULY ,17, 1868. Evening Post, Volume IV, Issue 132, 17 July 1868

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