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SUPERINTENDENCY OF CANTERBURY. ELECTION OF MR. ROLLESTON.

At noon on Friday last the election of a Superintendent for the Province of Canterbury took place. Mr. ltolleston was the only candidate, and was duly elected. The report of Mr. Holleston's speech on the occasion (says the Lyttelton Times) will be read with satisfaction by every one who is interested in the welfare of the province. On all main points Mr. Ilolleston holds sound views which will be acceptable to the majority of the community. Economy an-l patieuce are his watchwords. To work and to hope is the advice lie gives. And he shews that there is good room for hope when he points to the large productive powers of the province. Indeed, it is hardly conceivable to imagine how a population of 40,000, of all ages, which already exports produce to the amount of £600,000 a year, can need to be told to hope. This alone is a plain proof how far extravagance, both public and private, has demoralised the people at large. But {better times are in store now that we really begin to recognise the fact that there is no royal road to fortune, but that all alike must work and wait. It is with particular gratification that we learn Mr. Rolleston's views upon two important topics —the land regulations and immigration. With regard to the former, Mr. itollestou avows himself averse to all change, mainly for the reason that if the price °of land is lowered, the public estate will inevitably be thrown into the hands of large landholders, and very probably encumbered with debts, the interest of which will go out of the province. By this means the small proprietor will be shut out from the soil,aud the country impoverished to tho evaefc extent of his earnings. On the subject of immigration, Mr. Kolleston holds equally sound doctrine. He deprecates the idea of flooding the labour market vrllli the kiul of labour which is not wanted, and points out at the same time that it is necessary to supply the large productive sources of industry with an adequate amount of rural labour. And that if this is done judiciously it will re-act upon the towns by causing an increased demand for the labour of artisans. On colonial matters, Mr. Ilolleston is equally correct in his views. He traces the causes of the evils from which we have suf- | fered to their true source, and points out that while we have been working, other parts of the colony have been squandering our earnings upon worse than useless wars, for which we have now to pay. He points out that the taxation of the colony can never be relieved unless all further loan-mongering is put an end to. And he adds that the inci-ease of population can alone really relieve the taxpayer by sharing among a large number the burden which falls so heavily at present upon a scanty population. On the subject of local institutions, the speaker's remarks were equally satisfactory. He pointed out, with truth, how admirably our municipal institutions and Road Boards have been worked, and drew the moral from these examples that the gradual extension of

the power of local Government is all that is likely to be required in order to secure the peace, order, and good government of the province. Mr. Rolleston's address was received with quiet satisfaction by a large and very influential meeting, and his manner left the impression that he will be true to his word when he said " that no exertion on his part should be wanting to realise the hopes that had been j expressed by the gentlemen who proposed and seconded his nomination."

The anniversary of the Queen's birthday was celebrated in Wellington to-da}? The banks were closed, all business suspended, and the shipping in harbour hoisted every available bit o£ bunting. The Porirua volunteers came into town to swell the military display, aud were met at its entrance by the excellent band of the Artillery. The Wellington Artillery, Veterans, Rifles, and Cadets, aud Porirua Rifles, went through a general inspection and review on the reclaimed land. The various evolutions of the Artillery and line volunteers were got through with great precision. At the instant the noon tiuieball dropped the first gnu of the Artillery "waked it 3 deep mouthed thunder," and after seven guns had been fired the respective companies fired a feu de joie, aud fclie Artillery repeated until the Royal salute of twenty one guns had been fired, the bands playing "God save the Queen." The various corps next inarched through the town, accompanied by a large number of the numerous spectators who had attended the review, and the members of the Wellington Fire Brigade. A sailing match round the harbor between the Hind and Star of Peace, and also some pulling matches took place during the course of the afternoon. This evening the Odd Fellows will give a ball at their Hall, and the Wellington Volunteer Fire Brigade will have a torchlight procession through the town, to be followed by a supper at the Empire Hotel, and many of the numerous illuminations prepared for the visit of his Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh will be lit up, and fireworks set off, and bonfires lighted. Altogether her Majesty's Birthday will be better celebrated than it ever before has been in the Empire City. His Excellency the Governor and party are reported to have been most loyally received at the different townships on the Great South Road, Auckland ; the usual addresses, speeches, and replies have been made with all due ceremony. A Provincial Government Gazette was issued on the 17th instant, proclaiming the new gold field at Kennedy's Bay, Auckland. In the House of Commons, on the 19th March last, Mr. H. Lewis asked the Undersecretary of State for the Colonies what steps had been taken to put the men of the New Zealand Defence Corps iiito possession of the land to which they are entitled for their services, and what was the reason of the delay which had taken place in giving the men the portions of land to which they were entitled. Mr. Adderley replied that the home Government had nothing to do with the matter. There had been delay in making the allotments, but he understood they would ultimately be made. This morning as Mr. Hastwell's (Cobb and Co. 's) coach was near the Hutt Bridge, the horses became restive, and as M'Quinuey the driver tightened the ribbons to hold them in, the reins broke, and he, of coui"se, lost control over the horses as they bolted up the road and finally stopped at Valentine's. Beyond a few scratches to the driver and to one of the passengers, no damage was done. The steamers Taranaki and Wellington arrived yesterday, the former from the South and the latter from the North. It would appear that the question was raised, in inference to the state "trials at Hokitika, whether Mr. Ireland could be allowed to appear in the Supreme Court without going through the formal preliminaries of admission to the Bar of New Zealand. It seems, however, that Mr. Ireland, as a Queen's Counsel, is not only entitled to appear in any of the Queen's Courts in the colonies, but to take precedence of barristers of the outer bar. Another curious question was also raised in connection with these trials, viz. , how far it is in rule for a Queeu's Counsel to accept a retainer against th e Crown for prisoners charged with seditions without special leave from the law officers of the Crown. — JYelson 3faif. Of Mr. Gladstone's motion for the abolibion of the Church Establishment in Ireland, the Outgo Daily Times observes :—": — " There is j a movement going on that will be regarded with deep interest throughout the British Empire. It i 3 no new thing to hear of the grievances of Ireland. One by one they have been removed ; but some still remain, and one of the heaviest of them is about to be attacked. It requires rare qualities of mind in a statesman to assail successfully an ecclesiastical establishment. He must expect to make enemies on every side. But Mr. Gladstone, who has undertaken the task of ridding Ireland of the burden of a Church opposed to the religion of the people, will b« supported by the intelli',enl tlas3C3 in Great Britain and Ireland. Mi. Di-sraeli, for the present, opposes the movement. How far he will carry his opposition remains to be seen. Precisely the same policy was pursued inreference to Roman Catholic Emancipation during years of agitation, until, at length, forty years ago the measure was carried by the same statemen who had most strongly opposed it. Possibly

Mr. Disraeli calculates upon, performing a "* similar feat, especially as he managed the Reform question so dexterously. At any rate he has taken means to rouse a strong feeling against himself, and it would be bet- ¦< ter for the interests of Ireland and the Episcopal Churches in both Countries, if he had fallen in with a movement, that each succeeding year has shown, i^Sjj^just as it was inevitable. '~* > Dr. Selwyn, the recently appointed Bishop of Lichfield, will leave London for his New Zealand diocese in July. He holds both bishoprics at present, and will continue to do so until his successor in. the colonial diocese is appointed. At present there is no endow- ' ment. The diocese of Lichfield will be placed in commission during Bishop Selwyn's absence, which must necessarily extend over several months. At a congregation at Cambridge, on 27th Feb., Ralph Richardson, Trinity Hall, was allowed by special grace to incept in Arts in his absence, he being resident in New Zealand. A telegram received to-day from our cor- -* respondent at Nelson, informs us that Douglas, who was found guilty of manslaughter for the murder of his mate, has been sentenced to imprisonment for life. The barque Formsby was signalised to-day from Mount Victoria, but has not yet entered harbour. This evening, owing to the activity of a few gentlemen who did not wish to let the day pass over without some little demonstration to mark the anniversary of the Queen's birthday, there will be a display of fireworks oa the Reclaimed Land. When applied to, a number of the inhabitants at once put their hands into their pockets and subscribed. A correspondent writing to our Oamaru J contemporary an account of a journey he - took to the Kakanui in search of the reported gold field, gives particulars of several paddocks recently dug in one ot the gullies near fche Waiareka stream. Near one of the paddocks was a bucket and rope which, appeared to have been, used for bailing out the -water. There were large heaps of wash dirt about, and the writer expresses his opinion that the prospectors had suspended operations until they could obtain sluice boxes, or other appliances. After examining the ground he concludes that although "there has undoubtedly been recent prospecting in the - locality referred to, Ido not think that the • " shotty" gold which has made so much talk in Oamaru has come from thence, as I should expect gold, if found there, to be fine and dusty. I have since learned that the alleged find is near the head of the Maerewhenua, about Messrs. Graham and Cook's property, and I am told (I don't vouch for its truth) that two men who have been working there for some time have gone down to Dunedin. to see if the Government are disposed to arrange with the owners of the property (freehold) for permission of gold-mining, to cut a waterrace, &c. Referring to the death of Mr. Drummond, - from snake bite, the Melbourne Argus says i — " The prolonged coroner's inquest into the cause of death of the late Mr. Win. Murray Drummond, police magistrate, who was bitten by a poisonous snake on the Ist May last, and presumedly died of the consequences on the following day, was concluded late last evening. The evidence was very voluminous, and at the last Professor Halford explained, in a very exhaustive way, the . nature of the poison, and describing Shires'a . 'autidote,' what it was composed of, aud how far Shires was justified in having^ any faith in it. The professor, in facw described it as useless, and Avithout *, even the merit of novelty, for it was wqfe ., known in America. It was, he said, composeJK. of iodine, ammonia, and spirits of wine. JHei|§ had discovered this before Shires reveafed' the secret of the mode of its preparation, and * he had tested it on animals with unvarying want of succes. Besides he pointed out that, supposing such a preparation were of any ' good, Shires' mode of applying it would prevent it having any effect. He explained Shires' immunity from the evil effects of snake poison, by referring it to the fact that his blood tolerated the poison much in the same way as a human being's system once , inoculated with small-pox poison experienced^ an inuminity from its effects afterwards ; nof^ that these cases were analagous, but c the • explanation came much in the same way.' The jury in their verdict found Shires guilty of 'manslaughter,' blamed Daley and. Wright for not exerting themselves to prevent the 'snake experiment' being tried, and, evpressed a hope that the authorities woiuu' put down * snake exhibitions' in the future." - To-morrow evening the drama of " Flying Jib or the Derby Day" will be reproduced at the Odd Fellows' Hall. The admirable manner hi which the various parts are taken and the expensive and elaborate\scenery are bound to draw a full house. ~\ '

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP18680525.2.10

Bibliographic details

Evening Post, Evening Post, Volume IV, Issue 86, 25 May 1868

Word Count
2,277

SUPERINTENDENCY OF CANTERBURY. ELECTION OF MR. ROLLESTON. Evening Post, Volume IV, Issue 86, 25 May 1868

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