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MELBOURNE.

Payment of the Civil Service salaries is to be resumed this morning. The operation is to be accomplished by the opening of a cash credit in the name of the Government, at the London Chartered Bank, and, on the strength of that arrangement, drawing moneys sufficient to meet the demands upon the Treas-iry. The intentions of the Government were communicated to both Houses of Parliament yesterday — to the Legislative Council by Governor's message, and to the Legislative Assembly by the hon. Treasurer, in reply to questions put by Mr. Macgregor and other hon. members. The Governor's message intimates that the "temporary and provisional arrangements" which have been made will not violate " either the letter or spirit of the law." It also communicates his Excellency's regret that he cannot interfere between the two Houses, and his desire that the dead-lock may soon terminate. The message, which is to be considered to-day, will probably provoke a lengthy debate. Mr. Cole's remark, on the Council adjourning last night, that the House would have " something to do tomorrow," shows that such an expectation is entertained by ministerial members. A large number of strangers were present in each chamber when business commenced yesterday, evidently in anticipation of some official disclosure. At the close of the sitting of the Legislative Assembly, the . Chief Secretary proposed that the House should adjourn until Tuesday next, but Mr. Levey objected, and ther- fore both Houses will meet to-day.— Argns, 6th September.

A serious accident (Rays the Canterbury Prcs) occurred on the Stunner road, on the evening of the !2fh inst. As Cobb and Co's coach wa* coming in from Christchurch, arid had just pas.t the Look-out station, near the rifle range, something gave way belonging to the drag at which the horses were startled and the vehicle was capsized. Mr. George Diamond we fear is injured beyond hope of recovery, having, in trying to jump out, fallen on to his hend. lie was surrounded by a pool of blood when picked up. Mr. Raphael, of the Canterbury Hotel, has also received very serious injuries, as well as Mr. Edward Hargreaves while several other gentlemen have received slight injuries. We may consider it fortunate that the coach capsized inwards instead of outwards, otherwise there would have been little chance for any of the passengers to escape. We believe no blame whatever is attached to the driver. [Mr. Diamond ha* since died and an inquest held on the body. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.] We extract the following item from the September number of the Southland I'olice Gazette, a monthly publication now nearly two years in existence, and .which has been found of considerable service in tracing offenders, &c. It is compiled in tbe office of the Commissioner of Police, by Mr. Thomson, Detective officer, and is circulated amongst the police of this and adjacent Colonies. Under the head of missing friends we find : — " Information is requested respecting John Henry Galborne, who in 1854 (being at that that timo a medical student) married one Mary Ransford, and in 1856 deserted her. In 1857, he left England for Victoria, where he remained till 1861 ; during this interval he followed various occupations, and at one time adopted for awhile in the neighbourhood of Melbourne the calling of a Methodist preacher. He returned to Great Britain in IB6t, and resided for some months in Glas-

gow, where he attended one of the medical schools. In 1861 or 1862, he again left Eng land, and is believed to be now in New Zealand, or in one of the Australian Colonies. He is said to have married one Teresa Claritta Field, at Ballan Victoria, on the 14th November, 1859. If living, he is now aged 31,5 feet 4 inches high, |dark hair, and usually wore neither whiskers, beard, nor moustache. Although not a duly qualified medical practitioner, he may probably be found practising when away from large towns."— Truly a friend more likely to be missed than grieved for . Referring to the man Young, condemned to suffer the extreme penalty of the law for murder, the Castleaiaine Daily News says :—": — " When the death warrant was read to David Young, it is reported on good authority, that he said that he would return to earth, and haunt three well known persons who, he considers, have been instrumental in obtaining- and enforcing his conviction." The cultivation of tobacco at Albury is rapidly increasing. Dr. Burnett is getting two tons of leaf rolled into cigars, and some thousands have been sold at £8 10s per thousand. The people of Wood's Point are anxious to acclimatize wild rabbits in that district. Application has been made to Mr. Austin, of Barwon Park, for a few to commence with. About 150 prisoners are v> be sent to Port Macquarie jail, so as to relieve the Darlinghurst jail, which is overcrowded.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/EP18650919.2.12

Bibliographic details

MELBOURNE., Evening Post, Issue 192, 19 September 1865

Word Count
812

MELBOURNE. Evening Post, Issue 192, 19 September 1865

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