Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

SPORT IN BRITAIN

March 4. THE TURF. Sportsmen, and sportswomen, for the fair sex are not behind nowadays, who have supported Easter Hero for the Grand National Steeplechase, had every reason to feel pleased with the performance of Air Whitney’s horse in the Bucklmrst Steeplechase al_ Lingfield. With an impost of 12st 71b, Easter Hero was made a hot favourite, and when he led his three rivals over the final fence he appeared to have the race won. Suddenly Desert Chief (receiving 831b) came with a strong challenge and just got up to wjn by a head

It appeared as though Easter Hero was caught napping, and the defeat may even do good. The distance was only two and a-Jialf miles, and naturally Mr Whitney’s crack is being trained to stay almost twice that distance. consequently he can hardly be expected to have dash tor a very last finish. It may also be discovered later that Desert Chief is much better than generally imagined, and altogether, the race at Lingfield. opened up possibilities.

Another notable Grand National horse in Gregalach ran at Lingfield, but played no part in the finish. He turned out for the Lingfield Park Steeplechase of three miles, and though fencing well, lacked the pace to stay with the leaders. Rather unusual interest centred in tlie Emblem Handicap ’Chase at _the Kompton Park Meeting. Gib, 12st 71b, beat Blaris, receiving 111b, by three lengths. A few weeks ago Easter Hero conceded Blaris 71b in the Mole Steeplechase at Sundown and won by eight lengths. In each case tlie distance was two and a-half miles, and the “ book ” form suggests there is little to choose between tlie two cracks. That a race is never won until the post has been passed was well illustrated by what happened to Troutwal in the Bagshot Selling Handicap at Hawthorne Hill this week. Pineapple was leading by ten lengths two fences from home, but then fell. G. Wilson, the jockey concerned, was so smart in regaining the saddle that Pineapple finished second. The fall enabled Mr R. F. Goad to gain another victory on his horse Gryphon, and fie is another owner-rider who has met >viih considerable success this season. RUGBY. All is not well with French Rugby. There are two rival camps striving to control the game, one on strict amateur lines, and the other permitting liberal expenses to players. Apart from this, the control of the game by the officials lias given rise to adverse comment anil at last the authorities in Britain and Ireland have decided that there shall he no international fixture with France next season, nor until a better state of affairs prevails. Of course, tins decision lias given rise lo wide comment in France, and it must tend to make bad feeling. Still, some of the French authorities admit that Rugby in Franco is far from satisfactory, ami that it is up to them to bring about a better state of affairs.' Ireland brought off another great Rugby win when meeting Scotland at Dublin on Saturday. With the advantage of playing with a strong wind and snowstorm behind them, the Irish men scored 8 points in the opening half, whilst Scotland registered a try, which was converted. Turning round, when only 3 points in arrears, the Scots felt confident ol winning, now that tiie strong wind was in their favour. It was thou that tinhome players showed their worth and their defence was wonderful, and by keeping the Scots at bay they won a very exciting match. Wales were altogether too clever tor then French rivals in the Swansea fixture. It was a not of scoring, as

the 35 points to 3 success of Wales suggests. The win makes it appear probable that Wales will win the international championship, though Ireland may upset matters when the two nations meet at Belfast, and the struggle is likely to he hectic. SOCCLH. Lxcter City is an example showing that a small club . f enthusiasts can attain high honours in the football held. Wolverhampton Wanderers won the F.A. Cup a good many years ago when, the team was almost entirelycomposed of local players. Now we have seen Lxcter City bowl over highlytalented first division teams, made up of players secured by the payment of large sums of money. When called on to visit Sunderland last Saturday, practically every critic thought the task of the third division club hopeless, yet “ Gloriois Devon” gained a moral victo.ry by making a draw of it. Sunderland appeared likely to romp home at first, but the visiting players showed wonderful stamina and outstayed their rivals. There were upwards of 51,000 people present, so the Kxcter men were not dismayed by the great gathering of onlookers, most of whom were Sunderland supporters. That Chelsea managed to make a dr aw of it when visiting Birmingham was not unexpected. Having beaten Arsenal (holders) the Chelsea | layers were counted on to do well, even though away from home. It was the wonderful skill of Jackson which played a big part in the partial success of Chelsea Me gave tlw> visitors the lead after eight minutes play. In the second half Birmingham had a spell of brilliancy and scored two goals, and it was only a last strong effort which enabled Chelsea to draw level. Over 55,000 spectators were on hand to see the plav the receipts being over L f.DDO.

As anticipated, the West Bromwich Albion and Wolverhampton Wanderers tie 1 provieled many thrills. The Wolves looked like winning, until Shaw headed through ins own goal, a misfortune which enabled the home siele to draw.

Dixie l Dean se-ond four goals for (Overtoil against Southport, and other players got five, so that the favourites for tin* imp had the big margin of nine goals to one on their favour, the' only tie which led to a eleeisive result. That the replays in the I'LA. Cup ties tn-elay all ended in wins for visiting t"ams. Sunderland. Birmingham, ami West Hromwie-h, again showing the uncertainty of football. BOXING. The ret urn mate'll hi'lwcmi Charlie SmitU, of London, and Larry Gains, (he coloured boxer from Canada, looks likelv to prove' one of the l biggest attractions of the season. Originally it was intendeel that the' men should inei'l at the’ Crystal I’alaee. bill the National Sporting Glidi, tlm premmters, are so

ini pressed by the manner boxing appeals in the provinces, that the venue lias been altered to Leicester. The contest means much to both men. if Smith can turn the tables he will bo well placed to secure a match for the English heavy-weight title. Should Gains again win, lie may quite likely he able to cross the Atlantic and fix up a match for big money against one of the leading lights. Harry Crossley, of Alcxborough, who holds the cruiser title, had to strive hard to gain the decision in his contest against Georges Gardebois, of France, which was staged at Manchester early this week. It was a return encounter, for when they met in London some time since, both sustained head injuries which led to a no decision verdict. The men were both out to secure a decisive win on Alonday, and the fortunes appeared to sway first to one and then the other. Both showed signs of the punishment they experienced, but as the end of the contest drew near, they put more and more energy into their efforts. it must be confessed, however, that science was not a strong point, nor were the punches well directed, or there would have been a knock out. When the fifteenth round ended the general opinion was that there was little in it. though Crossley gained the decision. Another big man in Jack Stanley, of Deptford, knocked out P. Hoffman, of Holland, in the third round of their contest at Nottingham this week, so that two internationals went well for the home men. BILLIARDS. The level match between duo Davis and Tom Newman, which ended last; Saturday, provided a very interesting struggle for those who watched the final stage 1 Davis was nearly 4,000 points in Front at one time, hut Newman made a "Teat effort towards the end. and a break of 1,280 on the final day brought him within striking distance. Another break of 674 at the final session enabled him to take the lead, hut Davis showed great steadiness at the eiitieal stage, and playing well, managed to win by 612, a very fine game. Davis thus atoned lor Ids defeat when meeting Newman to decide which should oppose Lindrnm for the Empire Gold Cnp. Lindrnm has been making new records at Hanley, where he easily defeated APConachy in a match. ’I he Australian scored 2 V >B6 points at one session, lasting one and three-quarter hours, which is truly a rapid rate oi piling up the points. Davis has decided to defend his title as snooker champion, and Tom Dennis, of Nottingham, is his only challenger, so that th(’ champion again looks like taking the honour. —The Amateurs. — The competition proper for tlie amateur championship is now in course of decision. General opinion favours the chances of Lawrio Steeples, of Sheffield, the holder, whilst S. Lee. of London. and H. Coles, of Cardiff, are considered his most dangerous rivals. A veteran in Lewis Stroud has again entered. Some of my readers may recall that he was in the front rank of cyclists away hack in the ’nineties, and his enthusiasm for sports is refreshing. The annual match between Oxford and Cambridge was decided in London this week, the Cantabs scoring all along the line. Id. L. Carr defeated S. Nixon. 600 to 364. K. C. Gandar-Dower beat the Newa'i of Bataodi by 600 to 406. and R. 8. Davis proved successful in his match against F. M. Bancroft by 600 to 307. These matches were for the first, second, and third strings respectively. ATHLETICS. it was unfortunate that snow storms and rough weather generally made matteis uncomfortable for the hundreds of competitors and thousands of onlookers, who supported the three district cross-country championships last Saturday. The Southern at Shenfieid. in Essex, which was the forty-third race, had 276 starters, of whom 236 finished the trying course o! slightly oxer ten miles. Tbe recruiting tor the Army max reveal that there are far too main (men about, but if more supported cross-country running we should soon have a more healthy nation. Early in the race L. H. Wetlierill. of the South London Harriers, took the lead, and. although challenged by A. Ailuin. Be!grave Harriers, at eight miles, lie went

iiwav to xvin by 6yds in 62min 26see. V. Harman (of Slough). G. 11. Grefcton (of AVuodlord), and S. herns (of Whyeomhe Blnunix) followed behind Adorn. The winner is twenty-four years of age, and he has shown steady improvement over country, although this is his first big championship success. It is ol interest to note that be is by way o! a food “ faddist,” and his success shows that a simple and largely vegetable and fruit diet can sustain a man and permit ol Ids accomplishing leats calling for stamina.

The South London Harriers again won the team championship, the six men to score finishing inside seventeen places, to total 55 points. Mien f ;'tne the Aldershot Command. II” points, and Bclgrave Harriers, with 150 points. —A Big Surprise.—

Tlk> Neirthcrn race at Mayehtek Bark provided :i surprise. K. Harper iv:is 111 in!»!<■* to rim, due to influenza, whilst A, Burns, the Klswiek star, and I. Kvenson, were oil colour, and finished no closer than seventh and lifth respeedively. G. \\ . Hailey, the Knglish and Kmpire steeplechase champion, ran splendidly to finish an easy winner in oi?min os'ec. the’ course being about nine miles. lie is an improved man, and may earn even higher honours. Hack in the 'nineties the Salford liar-

riers won numerous e-ross-e-oiintry ehampionships. Them e-ame a blank time', ami it is twenty-nine years si ne-c the Turkey Bed jerseys were earrii'd to the fore' to semire individual and term honemrs. It is interesting to note that. I Tarry Harelwie-k lias he'hl the hop. secretaryship throughout, and he will soon complete his jubilee in offii'i*. Ihe Salford Six totalled IIG points, ami only had a single point to spare over Sheffiedel (’n ite’d Harriers, with Leeds !fa real ill Harriers next. ITalla nishire I farriers, holders, gained fourth plae-e. Great B miners. ■ 'l'he Midlaml ediampionsliip was run at Sioki'-on- lre nt . ami showed w hat a line runner •). \V. Winfield is. 'I he Derby man won the ten miles Hat e hampioiiship last spring, and his lali'st sue - - ce-s Siiggi'sis he may hohl his title'. -I. T. Holden and W. IL Howard were his nearest rivals on Saturday, though he> won easily, the* time being G2min ’-Msec for lan miles ol ln*avy I'oiimry. Bef ■ll ( suspensions deprived the Biride field Harriers of three out stain ling run imrs, \et the' club again won the learn

race 1 . The scorin'; six occupied positions from tin' tilth to six toon t!i places, and totalled (jd points. I ipton 111 and Derby Itisi bein'.; next. —A National Ground. — At last there appears some likelihood that the Amateur Athletic Association may have a suitable ground ior (he sraeine of its championships. It is possible that the association will enter into an agreement with one or more sport inn; bodies to acquire tin* White City eroumb the scene oj the Olympic (James in l!)l)sb It is a bij; onelosure, permitting; of a cinder path three laps to the mile, with a cement path lor eveliiisi outside this. The around is now used for wreyhonnd racin';, but d adopted for athletics it is expected that a new track ot I !i)yds to llu* lap wdi be laid out. There is ample room improper dressing rooms and • >ijj; stands, ami it is lioped the negotiations will be carried lhron,i;h to a snccesslnl conclusion.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DUNST19310420.2.33

Bibliographic details

SPORT IN BRITAIN, Dunstan Times, Issue 3518, 20 April 1931

Word Count
2,331

SPORT IN BRITAIN Dunstan Times, Issue 3518, 20 April 1931

Working