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SPORTS AND PASTIMES

LONDON, January 1. It is iv matter for satisfaction that statistics in regard to racing under Jockey Club rules show a highly flourishing state of affairs. Figures show that 4,792 horses were raced on the flat during the 1930 sea son that the figures are likely to he Further advanced in the future is suggested by the fact that there were more two-year-olds concerned than in 1929, which must lead to greater numbers in the near future. Equally satisfactory is the amount put Up in stakes. The monetary ieward in 1930 was upwards of .£BOO,OOO, I which was over £7,000 more than the i previous year. In these days of trade degression, it must surely be a good sign that racing is flourishing. Sonic may think the money and enterprise in association with the turf might be better appliod in other directions. It is by no moans certain that this would lead to a more prosperous community, however. Racing leads to the circulation of much money, and any restriction would prove a disaster to a large section of the community. It is only necessary to contemplate the money spent in transport in connection with racing. Practically everyone who attends a meeting has to pay one of the railways for transport, or if going by road, that means help to the motor industry, with its many branches. Then there is the catering trade, which supplies,the refreshments of race-goers. Even the money lost by punters does good to others besides the layers of odds. The average bookmaker is a free spender, and he naturally passes on his winnings to tradesmen and those who supply the public with amusements. To hark back a moment, of the big sum offered in stakes, over £700,000 was associated with races in England. The amount was an advance on 1929, though slightly less than in 1927 and 1928. Altogether the turf in England is highly flourishing. FOOTBALL. Rugby enthusiasts of wide experience are agreed that the closing stages of the Phigland v. Wales match it Twickenham last Saturday provided excitement never surpassed in a like fixture. Wales has never yet defeated England at Twickenham, but when the visitors held a lead with only 3mm remaining for play, the bogey of the ground for the Welshmen appeared to be beaten. It was not to be, however, and England made it all square witn only a tew seconds to spare. The match had not been in progress many minutes when it was seen that the Welsh forwards were slightly better than their rivals. The men in the back row of the England scrum were slow to heel the ball, and Powell usually had time to dash forward and spoil the efforts of the English scrumhalf to set the " threes " in action. Nor were the English wing throequarters very much in the picture, and the match snowed that more attention must be paid to a dashing attacking line, which, after all, is a fine defence. It is generally agreed that the Welshmen deserved to win. After about 20min of hectic play, Powell kicked a goal from a mark, a really wonderful effort. Soon after this, T. E. Jones-Davies made a wonderful run to register a try, but Powell failed to add the extra points. With a lead of 6 [joints, the Welshmen appeared well placed, but a dramatic change tame over the scene. First of all, 13. H. Black was successful when taking a penalty kick, whilst a bad throw-in for Wales led to J). W. Borland getting the ball, and he dashed past several rivals to score a try, which he converter! himself. This sudden change altered the look of things, and England held a two-point lead at the interval. As the game neared its close, the English defence appeared likely to hold, but with only 3min remaining, J C. Morley scored a try, which J. Bassett, the full-back, converted. The excitement and enthusiasm of Hie Welshmen over what appeared a certain win was wonderful, and w.ill not j easily be forgotten. Suddenly the whistle blew for an infringement in a scrum, and a great silence spread over the 50,000 onlookers as Black was entrusted to take the kick. Loss than a minute remained, but he kept calm, and carefully weighed up the situation. A few short steps, and then he sent the ball over the crossbar and between the posts, to make the scores 11 all. Practically every Englishman felt sorry for the Welsh crowd, deprived f 'l a win in the last low seconds, and through an infringement. I As the visitors crossed the English | line twice, whilst the home side only once got ovei the Welsh line, the play I suggests that the Welshmen were superior. It remains to add that Dr J. K. Wheeler, of Ireland, idled the position of referee. Having dravn with last seasons champions, Wales must now be in the running for the international championship ASSOCIATION. If paper form were a sure guide, CheLsea would easily defeat Arsenal in the all-important FA Cup tie at Stamford Bridge. What would students ol form make tt this? When Sunderland visited Stamford Bridge some five weeks ago Chelsea beat their visitors by 5 clear goals. Thus when Sunderland had (o visit Arsenal last Saturday it was natural to anticipate an easy win for the leaders of the first division, further, hail not Arsenal beaten the famous Aston Villa ou the latter's ground in the replayed cup tie? What happened suggests that the Arsenal players took so much nut. of themselves in the struggle against the Villa that they were jaded and unable to show their best form. Anyway. Sunderland scored twice through Our ney and once through Kden, whilst James got one goal for Arsenal. Sheffield Wednesday made no mistake when receiving Grimsby, 4 goals being registerml Ivy the home men. In spite of the set-back, Arsenal remains first favourite for the premier league championship being two points behind Sheffield Wednesday, with two matches in hand. And now a word about Chelsea. Although without Gallagher, who is under suspension, the Stamford Bridge team again defeated West Ham when the clubs met at Stamford Bridge in a league fixture on Saturday. The homo side brought Mills into the team, the old Bromley amateur showing excellent form as centre forward. Whilst he did not score himself, he was largely concerned in thi spirited attack which led to Chelsea registering two goals to one by their rivals. This good form siig-

"ests that the Stamford Bridge team is still a power in spite of tho temporary loss of Gallagher. BOXING. Some of England's best judges of box- ' ing are hopeful that J. Pettifer, already I known as the English Camera, will develop into the best heavy-weight in the country. ! He took part in his fifth contest at ' the Crystal Palace this week, G. Ghesquirre, of Belgium, being his rival. Considering the short time Pettifer has been at the game he boxes well, the manner he uses his left being particularly good. So far, however, he has not discovered how to put all his weight into his punches with the right, though added experience may alter this. The Belgian proved a tough customer, but Pettifer was, his master throughout'the contest, which ended in the eighth round, when a cut over the eye forced the visitor to retire. A policy of caution is being adopted with Pettifer, those behind him wisely realising that it is not advisable to match him with a man out of his class. Slow but sure is the motto, and Pettifer has successfully emerged from each task so far. More interesting fights were seen at the Crystal Palace this week, when several bouts in a heavy-weight tournament for novices were decided. F. Rowland, of Devon, made a good impression, the manner he knocked out B. Lott, of London, in the opening round of their bout being convincing proof that he lias a real' punch, Rowland is a powerful young fellow, weighing over List, who works on his father's farm in Devonshire, an ideal life for a young boxer anxious to make good. BILLIARDS. Low Newman made something like a native record during the course of his two weeks' match against Joe Davis at Thurston's Hall. His average for everv complete break was 200, a very high" figure of merit, and proof that he has greatly improved this season. His best strokes during the second week were 1,2-12 and 1,010, so that he made four breaks over the thousand mark during the match. He scored 23,603 during the two weeks, and it is interesting to note that Liudrum registered 23,791 during the same period against M'Conachy. As Lindrum will have to concede Newman 7.000 points when they meet to decide which shall take the premier prize m the empire tournament the prospects of the home man must be bright. Still, Liudrum is a marvel, and he has set his heart on taking that gold cup backto Australia. ATHLETICS. It seems that C. Allum, of the Belgrave Harriers, must be considered a new- star in the running world. He recently won the Middlesex County cross-country championship, whilst le added to his reputation last Saturday by winning the London business houses championship. This was run over five miles of country near Chingford, Allum winning easily, in spite of losing 50yds through getting off the trail. W. H. Gross was second best, whilst a bad cold prevented H. W. Payne from finishing better than ninth. Payne has a fine record in connection with the race, having won it seven times in nine years. His plucky running helped his team, the Great Eastern Railway Club, which won the team honours easily with 68 points. GENERAL. Gipsev Daniels and Bob Carvel had s» great" fight in their contest at Hull this week, Carvel being defeated .'n the twelfth round. Salmon fishing opened on several Scottish rivers this week, and with mild weather and a nice height ci water " tight lines " may be expected. W. Stott, tho leading jockey under National Hunt rules, had the misfortune to break a bone in his foot, as the result of a mishap wiicn riding at Leicester this week. This will keep him out of the saddle for a bit, but all being well he will be able to resume in about two weeks. Mr T. R. Laidlaw, who bred Aboyour, the Derby winner of 1913, has decided to discontinue racing aiid breeding in Ireland. His decision is due to "disagreement with the ruling ol the Turf Club, and his action means a loss to racing in Ireland. It is expected that a German eight will compete at Henley regatta next July, the first enterprise of the sort since the war. The decision has largely been arrived at because a German sculler reached the final ol the diamond sculls last duly, when Guest, of Canada, gained first honours. Archie Compson accomplished a great round when playing over the Coombc Hill golf course yesterday, his score being 65—very fine going for this time of the year, when there is little run on the ball. Easter Hero gave a fine exhibition of jumping when winning the Wigston Steeplechase at Leicester yesterday. This is the first outing Easter Hero has had since he won the Cheltenham Gold Cup last March. Evidently Mr J. H. Whitney's crack is sound and well, which means he will top the weights for the Grand National.

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SPORTS AND PASTIMES, Dunstan Times, Issue 3513, 16 March 1931

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SPORTS AND PASTIMES Dunstan Times, Issue 3513, 16 March 1931

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