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FIFTY THOUSAND POUNDS FOR A BARONEICY.

THE FRIENDLY SER'UCIvS OF SIR WM. MARKIOI i. WHY HOOLEY IS K.i. 1 ' M’l ERNEST. [From the Evening Star’s Correspondent.] Despite the irate disclaimers of Mr E. T. Hooley’s erstwhile friends regarding the nature of their transactions with that eminent financier, it was well understood (hat none of them cared or dared to have him crossexamined. In consequence the crowd of curious onlookers at Basinghall street on November 8, when the famous bankrupt's case came up again, was limited. The advent of that stormy petrel Sir George Lewis soon, however, indicated that (here was something unexpected in the wind. The something nrescntlv appeared in the bulky person of Sir William Marriott, who, it transpired, desired to explain to the Court how Mr Hooley became a member of that august institution" the Carlton Club. Sir "William is an eminent man with a history. His friends describe him as a victim of awkward coincidences. His enemies aver that he has never been insensible to financial considerations, and is always what vulgar City men call “on the make.” Sir William was boiling over with indignation at the allegation that he received £I,OOO for getting Hoolev made a member of the Carlton. He characterised the statement as “ one of the most abominable lies over told in a court of justice.” Mr Hooley was a candidate for the Ilkeston Sc'nn'A' 11 Derbyshire, and having given to party funds and promised ■Lo,OOO more was considered by the club committee eligible for membership. then, was the £I,OOO cheque Sir " Ilham had received for? inquired the Official Receiver.

Sir William stated that he advised Hooley m large transactions affecting many people and tens of thousands of pounds. He also advised him on a delicate matter affecting one of his employes, and he acknowledged that his services were invaluable. As he could not receive fees for these services he offered to allot him shares in his new comnanics. This he did, and when witness was down speaking for him in Ilkeston, Hoolev told him there was a large sum due to him on these allotments. On Hoolcy’s advice he left them in his hands to deal with, and the £I,OOO cheque was on account of that sum due, and had nothing to do with the Carlton Mr Hooley’s face whilst this elaborate but not very convincing explanation was progressing was a picture. Later, however, Ik? got even with his old friend and counsellor averring that the latter had told him lie did all the dirty work for the Conservative party.”

Sir William admitted that before the Car. • ton election came off he, at the request certain members, went to Hooley’s bank and ‘tested his solvency. The manager told him that Ernest Terah was worth a million at least, and said they themselves would lion.)’ his cheque for £500,000. Sir William had now to confess that be had tried to buy a Jubilee baronetcy for Hooley, and -iven Mr Middleton (the'welli known Conservative agent) a cheque for £50.000 for this pnrnose. Both he and Middleton had told the man repeatedly that" it couldn’t be done, but curiously enough the cheque was not returned till after the’Jubilee. Sir AVilliam did not add that he was to ;receive an additional £IO,OOO if the baronetcy came off. That was a side light Hoolev himself added later. The bankrupt was furiously incensed at some of Marriott’s 'suggestions, and losing all control of himself once bawled that if he didn’t cease lying he’d come and pull him out of the witness box

Sir George Lewis cross-examined Sir AVilliam Marriott with great effect, thiswise : , Who introduced you to Hooley? His private secretary. And who may that have been ? Sir William (angrily): Broadley. Sir George (with intense significance, which was keenly appreciated by all acquainted with the ex-Pasha’s history): Ah! Broadley Pasha! Really! That is like you, Sir George, all over, retorted witness, with a sneer. Sir George Lewis: It may be. I have not. had £50,000 passing through my hands for the Carlton Club. Sir AVilliam: It is done for a purpose—a gross purpose. Mr Broadley had been my client in Arabi Pasha’s case. One of the services I rendered to Mr Hooley was the getting rid of Mr Broadley. He professed that I had rendered him invaluable service, for he professed not to know everything. Sir George: So Broadley introduced you to Hooley, and you rewarded him by getting him dismissed? By the way, who introduced Mr Hooley to the Carlton?—l am not going to give any names. AVhat is the entrance fee to the Carlton? Is it £10,000?

Sir William was furious by this time, and Mr Pollock, his counsel, white with indignation. The Registrar held that the question need not be answered. i Sir George: He has sworn that he had nothing to do with the recommendation of Mr Hooley to the Carlton Club. Sir William: I have sworn nothing of the kind. Sir George Lewis: Who was the Mr Middletoon to whom £50,000 was paid ? Mr Pollock: I object. The Registrar: Everybody knows. Mr Pollock: The cheque was returned, and no payment was made. Sir George; Was it returned after the Jubilee?

Witness: Yes. _ Sir George cross-examined witness as to the allotments of shares which he alleged H io- iv made him. “ I thought Mr Hooley was a gentleman! ” was one of Sir William’s asides. “ All prejudice! ” was the comment on another question. , Mr Pollock objected that Sir George was asking Sir William about his company directorships. , Sir George; If I had I should mention them. : Sir William Marriott: You may mention them. Sir George was putting other questions when Sir William angrily interrupted. “Do listen to me, and don’t make out your own case.”— (Laughter.) Sir George: You want everybody to believe you, and no- Mr Hooley. Sir William : I hope everybody does. Sir George: I want to test your evidence. Sir William: Do so. After other questions about his services witness said; “ I don’t think you would have done it for nothing. I never made a bargain with him.” Sir George Lewis: You provoke me. I should certainly not have done what you have done, and I am not a Queen’s counsel. Sir William; You would have done less f> r more money. Later Mr Hoolev went into the box again, and in reply to Sir George Lewis said that more than £IOO,OOO— perhaps £150,000 was paid to Mr Broadley. His examination proceeded thus: Has lie ever given an account of what lie has done with that money?— No. Are you aware that your trustees have .asked him to furnish an account of that money?—! believe such is the case. ~ How much was paid by him for ‘ arranging with the Press?—He told a friend of mine that he had made £BO,OOO. —(Laughter.)

You believed in him? —Yes. Do you suggest that any proprietor oi a iy editor of any newspaper, except the ‘ Financial Post’ and another, had knowledge of stcict payments to those in their employment - N Who introduced Sir William Marriott? - Mr Broadley, who said be was a useful vxx io know. —(Laughter.) ,• P ;«• Did you become intimate with him. re.. I saw him four or five days a week for « wo years. He came to my bouse and stayed .vith m js there any truth in the statement that vou were to pay money for the advice he gave you.

—There was no arrangement. Bo told me he did all the dirty work for the Conservative party.—(Loud laughter.) He knew you were a Conservative?—(Laugh- - ter). —Yes. Did you ever give him Singer shares and Hydraulic Joints?— Yes, for services rendered. He converted them into money as soon as he received them. You are a magistrate?— Yes. I think he got it done.—(Laughter.) As to the £I,OOO cheque, which was contemporaneous with your election to the Carlton Club, was that a payment to him?— That was what I promised him if I got in. Is there any truth that this was a paynvnt for other services?— No.

By whoso hands were the £5,000 che pies conveyed to the Carlton? —By Sir William’s. He came for the money. Was that a voluntary gift to the Carlton?— Yes, for the funds of the party. The cheque for £50,000 was to be paid if he got the baronetcy. Sir William wanted £IO,OOO when it was done. Who fixed the amount ?—He did. I tried for £35.000, but could not get it. I gave bin a cheque for that, but he brought it back, and said it was no good unless it was for £50,030. Had yon enough money at the time to meet the cheque?—l bad £450,000 in the Bank at the time. Arc you aware whether your name was sub mitted to the Queen? —I don't know.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DUNST18990113.2.41

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FIFTY THOUSAND POUNDS FOR A BARONEICY., Dunstan Times, Issue 1898, 13 January 1899

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FIFTY THOUSAND POUNDS FOR A BARONEICY. Dunstan Times, Issue 1898, 13 January 1899

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