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SPORTING.

Jeddab, the winner of this year's Derby, missed all his important engagements at two years old, and he was not seen out under silk until the Newmarket October Meeting, when lie made his debut in the Clearwell Stakes, being defeated in that erenfc by Orzil, who, with 91b the worst of the weights, easily defeated his opponent by three lengths. Daring the same month Jeddab. was started for a free Handicap at Newmarket, in which race he was weighted at Bst, and started second favorite at 4. to 1. He, however, succumbed to an outsider in Meta, who defeated him by a head. It might be said that Jeddab. was never seriously considered to be in the Derby, and when any reference was made by the English writers to him bis chance in the blue riband contest was disposed of in a very brief fashion. Though Jeddah was out of favor for the Derby, he can lay claim to the possession of a pedigree that fairly bristles with bine blood. He was got by Janissary, a son of the stout-hearted Isonomy, from Pilgrimage, who won the One Thousand Guineas for Lord Lonsdale in 1878, while his grand dam (Jannette) on the sire's side carried Lord Palmouth's colors to victory in the Oaks and St. Leger Stakes in the same year. Batt, who ran second, proved himself a pretty fair colt as a two-year-old, by winning two out of the three races which he contested at that age, his successes being gained in the Criterion Stakes of 6SoaoYs and the Honghton Stakes of 427sovs. Dunlop only carried the colors of his Royal owner, the Prince of Wales, on one occasion as a two-year-old, when he succeeded in winning the Prendergast Stakes of 972sovs by a head.

At the last Maribyrnong races Bannacht Laith stumbled and got rid of his rider. With the load off his back, the brother to Bmonna-Knuck quickly worked his way to the front, made the home turn in the neatest possible manner, and eventually finished half a length in front of Devoted, the winner. Bannacht Laith pulled up after passing the post when the others did, and, as if realising that he had come in first, trotted back at the head of the field into the weighing enclosure, where he was caught by a bystander. The boy who rode the horse was in no way injured, and so the humor of the incident was thoroughly enjoyed by all—except the nnlucky backers;of Bannacht Laith.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DTN18980602.2.40

Bibliographic details

SPORTING., Daily Telegraph, Issue 9179, 2 June 1898

Word Count
417

SPORTING. Daily Telegraph, Issue 9179, 2 June 1898

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