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TELEGRAPHIC. [FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.] WELLINGTON, Tuesday.

THE SECOND READING OF THE COUNTIES BILL. Till second reading of the Counties Bill has been carried thus early with little further debate, and without any division. There were two moderate speeches, one on each •ide, by Mr. Eoweand Mr. Wood (Southland), and between them a sword and tiame speech from Mr. Macandrew. He spoke with more ■pint than on previous occasions, and was, of course, intensely prorincial and Otagan. He referred to Mr. Moorhouse's comparison of the colony to a stately oak, and said if the roots of Otago and Auckland were dissevered from the stem, and deprived of sap, where would then be the stately oak? As surely as the sun •bines in heaven, if Otago were deprived of its Land Fund, that root would sprout out into a separate tree. Let them suppose that 100,000 people are to be coerced into any system of Government, or deprived of their hard earning* against their will. (Mr Pyke exclaimed, "Tall talk.") It was not tall talk, but truth and loberneis. The introduction of this system would be the death-knell of the unity of the colony. Perhaps it were batter it should be so. He was a great believer in the survival of the fittest. As there seemed to be no disposition to speak after Mr. Macandrew, Sir Julius Vogel rose, but was met with "no reply." The amendments not having been disposed of then, Mr. Wood rose, and Sir Julius Vogel went out. Before he returned Mr. Wood had finished, and with a silent but significant remonstrance by Mr. Kelly, a division was taken. The Ayes had it, " that the word 'now, 1 proposed to be struck out, should stand part of the question ;" and when the original motion for the second reading was put, there was a fair average sound of "Aye," and one single feeble " No," and that stage of the bill was passed. It was Mr. Macandrew's expression, however, that it would come out of committee like Jjeau Swift's stocking. They would not be able to recognise the original, because of the darning.

SIR GEORGE GREY'S MEMORANDUM. Much ado has been made about Sir George Grey's memorandum or dying confeision as it is called. He would not leave it in the possession of the meeting, and what is purported to be a copy, was taken by Mr. Sheehan and Mr. Rees. After the meeting it waa refused the Press, though sent to Auckland. At any rate, the reporters were kept dangling between Mr. Sheehan and Sir George Grey. To-day it ha» been given only the evening Government organ. The regular occupants of the gallery had heard it often previously. Much ado seems to hare been made by some in your city about the Cross telegrams. They were substantially correct, as proved by contemporary record, and by subsequent circumstances.

THE TELEGRAM TO MR. TONKS. The telegram sent to Mr. Tonka was inridioui and commonly considered impudent. He wm no doubt acting in Accordance with others, And without Alternative under the altered circumstances of p*rtie».

HOW THE POST PUTS MATTERS. The Post puts the matters thus : " Naturally enough the Auckland members have been getting tired oi supporting a leader who achieved nothing. The defeat of the Separation resolutions showed them plainly that there was no hope of securing the objects they had in view in that diiection ; nor, in the meantime, is there any prospect •f the Land Fond being made Colonial Revenue, ao that no other course was open to them save that of trying to get the Government measures so modified as to confer upon their province the greatest practicable measure of benefit. Some of the Auckland members are shrewd and sensible men, aud do not see any use in fighting merely for opposition sake. The motto of Sir George is that he will go on resisting. * Ake, ake, ake,' for ever, for ever, for ever. Clearly there was nothing to be gained by supporting a leader of that sort. "

MR. BUCHANAN'S PETITION. The Petitiout Committee report that Mr. William Buchanan'* claim for a grant of land is entitled to consideration, and that the Provincial Government should have power to deal with this and similar cases.

THE WAIUKU PETITION. It alao recommends the petition of the ■ettlera of Waiuku to f*v»ur*ble consideration.

SUNDAY LIQUOR TRAFFIC. It recommendi alio to favourable consideration the petition of the inhabitants of the Province of Auckland against the sale of intoxicating liquors on Sunday. This evening will likely be occupied by a ducuMion on the personnel of the Select Committee on the Counties Bill. Another fancy drew ball wu held last •vening, and on the 4th of September the uiual sessional ball take* place.

[from anothx* correspondent.] WELLINGTON, Tuesday. SIR GEORGE GREY DETERMINED. Sir George Grey ii determined to oppose to the but, if only one man ii left with him. The New Zealand T'xmet' account of the Auckland caucus is substantially the same. It says Sir G«orge Grey is no longer the leader of the Opposition ; he no longer heads a party. It is said that Mr. Tonka represented to Sir George Grey that nothing was to be gained by a continuance in purposeless and factious opposition to the Government on the constitutional measures, and that it would be better fairly to shape tfeose measures as would be most advantageous to Auckland. It says that after Mr. Tonka' statement, 4 Sir George Grey thereupon formally resigned the leadership of the party, and left the meeting, accompanied by Mr. Diguan. With the exception of Sir George Grey and Messrs. Dignan, Reea, Sheehan, and Tole, the Auckland members, whilst not as a whole pledging thcuiselres to support the Government, will, on the measures that must necessarily replace the Provincial system, lend themselves heartily to working out that legislation which will be best for all parts of the colony, and in this they will have, we doubt not, the ultimate support of those Auckland people who for a time have tan ltd away by clap trap and nonsense."

LAST OOAM LLKUTlOiN RhPOKT. The Committee on the East Coast Election reported: 1. That Captain Read was not duly elected. 2. That ho -was guilty of bribery at the election. 3. That it was not proved that the bribery was committed with his knowledge. 4. That Captain Moi i is was duly elected. 5. That costs be awauled tj Captain Morns. G. That Captain Head pay Captain Morris £150 costs. The report has been ordered to be entered in the |oumalsof the House, and the Clerk of Wuts to attend the House to strike the name of Captain Read out of the election return, and nisei t that of Captain Morns.

TE WHEORO AND THE EPSOM MURDERER. To-day Sir Donald McLean laul on the table a letter from Tc Wheoio, complaining of a statement in the Waikato Tunes that he had connived at the escape of Winiata Te Wheoro mdigiuutlj denies the statement, and describes his elFoits to capture the murderer. The Walhtto Tduph' statement was derived fiom a mischievous halfcaste.

THE POST AGAIN. The Post, an Opposition journal, this evening says: — "The resignation of the leadership of the Opposition by Sir George Grey is an act which has been practically forced upon him. The Auckland people are somewhat unreasoning, but even they cau scarcely expect their members to persevere in a resistance by winch nothing c.in be gained. Doubtless on the first leceipt of the news there will bo a great display of indignation Tho Herald will be irrate and the S/ar go into convulsions of fury ; but they will cool dowu, and the representatives of Auckland will be asked to do the best thing for their province. The bulk of the Auckland members will look to the main chance, while Sir George Grey, freed from the caies and anxieties of leading his party, will still delight the Houise and country with his charming orations "

[PHR PRKss AGrXCY.J LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. TUFSD U . CODIFICATION OF STATUTES. In the Legislative Council to day, m loply to the Hou. Mr. Auckland, who put <i question relative to the codification of statutes, The Hon. Dr. Pom.kv said chat constitutional questions had prevented the la\r oflicers considering the matter. The Government, however, recognised the importance of the matter.

DEFENCE OF THE COLONY. The Hon. Colonel Brei r moved hi3 motion in refeience to the defence of the colony. He was supported by the Hon. Colonel Kenny, the Hon. Colonel WmrMORK, and tho Hon. Mr. Fka^ek, although they did not altogether agree with him. The Hon. Dr. Pollen did not consider the motion necessary. He thought the alarm of Colonel Brett as to invasion was premature The Hon. H. CimiBkiaiN defended the Volunteers, who had been alluded to in deprecatory terms by Colonel Whitmore and Colonel Brett. The motion was carried.

PUBLIC HEALTH BILL. The Public Health Bill was read a second time, after criticism by the Hon. Mr. WaterHot7.SK, the Hon. Dr. G-kace, and the Hon. Messrs. Menziks and Ciiambeulin. After some formal business the Council adjourned for dinner.

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TELEGRAPHIC. [FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.] WELLINGTON, Tuesday., Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXXII, Issue 5261, 23 August 1876

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TELEGRAPHIC. [FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.] WELLINGTON, Tuesday. Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXXII, Issue 5261, 23 August 1876

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