Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. UNKNWON

Now that '• linking lias become such a popular amusement amongst us, a lew iemaiks on the .11 1, and a hint or two to skater.*, rany not be out of place. Of course the 11mm advantage of roller-skating is that it affords people almost of all ages and condition, a means of very agreeable and healthful exercise — exercise which can be taken at evciy season of the year, at any time of the day ; and upon a properly-constructed rink, in any, state ot the weather. There are advantages in rmkskatmg which can be boasted by no other amusement yet invented. It is suited to persons of the most different physical powers, for while the strongest athlete can exhaust himself in violent exertions and difficult evolutions, the most feeble person cm enjoy more moderate exercise to be found in executing gentler and easier movements Tt is available not only to the idle, whose whole time is at their disposal, but even to those who are most occupied by serious business during the day ; and the professional man who is not released from his labours till the late afternoon, or even the evening, can always snatch j an hour, or at least half-an hour for his practice on the wheels. Of all pastimes that can be indulged 111 within doors, it is the one which most icsembles an outdoor exercise, owing to the large space, and consequent free supply of fresh air, which are essential to the very existence of a skating-nnk. Then, again, it is a divcision in which both sexes can 10m on fair and equal terms. The lady beginner finds an nistiuctor and guardian in some fnendly gentleman well up in the spoit; but considering the greater opportunities ladies have for practice, there is no reason why the fair pupil should not rival or outstrip the tutoi . But against these advantages two faults have been found, at least they are two only points that any leasonable person would consider. Fust, comes the supposed bad effects produced by over exeition, or straining of the muscular powci : second, the bruises and broken limbs lcsulting fiom bad falls Now with regard to the liist objection, I would say that the evils lcsulting from the abuse of a thing, are not valid articles of blame against the use of it. It is not to be doubted for a moment that any one unaccustomed to stiong exercise can injure themselves, even permanently, by a sudden and extravagant devotion to the link. So may be ovei tasking m any other absuul style their physical energies— if, for instance, they weie seized with an insane desiie to nval Mr. Wiltshire, and were to set forth on a hundred mile walk round the nearest garden ; yet, to skate for foui or live hours almost without stopping, on a burning hot summu'sj day, is assuredly less exhausting than to w all' for the same period. Plenty of ladies ha\e been known to indulge in the former piece of folly. How many have ever musteied up courage to undertake the latter feat ? Then as to the second objection, though we hear of accidents in the old countiy, wo have to congratulate oui selves on not seeing one chronicled as having oeeuiu'd at our 'ical rinks, and doesn't it lend an additional relish to the spoit, when it is known that there is a little danger ot tumbling over some newly inspired 1 inker, or having him tumble over you ! It has sometimes been pretended that the sort of exercise involved in wheel-skating is not benelicial, but the revei so ; and, possibly, some medical opinion of a \a«ue and off-hand descuption could be quoted" 111 justification of such a theory. But these opinions, if any there be, can be based on no rational principle derived fiom the science of anatomy, physiology, or, in fine, from common sense. Ne\t to walking, which it most neaily leseinbles, theie cannot be imagined a species of exercise moie lunuless when taken in moderation, or better calculated to strengthen and develop the limbs and the luugs. The Horn.' Xnv> of May 12 lefers as follows to I'otraich, the winner of the Two Thousand :— "The Guineas has been a piovokingly dilhcult race this year to handle. Looked upon throughout the winter as about the gieatest certainty for Petianh cvei known, it became, when that hor»e seemed as good as out of it, a mass of confusion, m which backers and analysts vainly sought for a clue. When horses are ' all together,' as the phiasc goes, when nearly eveiy thing that is goini; to run has beaten and been beaten by everything else, we aie natuially a good deal at sea, and individual fancies become our guides. ' The book ' tells us nothing, for the form of one week is upset by that of the following one so we aic peifoice compelled t» listen to rumouis of how much this horse has improved and that one gone back, and do the best our judgment tells us. Such has been the state of things this year. How Kaleidoscope has beaten Father Claret and been twice beaten by him ; how the second favourite, Great Tom, had been defeated on each occasion that he has run, and how Chaion, Julius Caesar, King Death, Coltness, &e., ran in the fashion that is called 'in and out' has already been shown in these columns, and need not now be repealed. When Petrarch changed hands foi the large sum of £12,000, sonic two months since, the result was to send him back 111 the Two Thousand market, a tociisf bum; then pretty generally expressed that his new owner would seek to win the race with a horse abeady his property — Kaleidoscope. Petrarch, however, recovered his position, to lose it again a few weeks ago on being stopped in his woik ; while his ' trial ' in the Ciaven week appeared to have effectually settled his chance. On the previous day, however, Loul Duppbn backed both Ins hoises, taking l,. r >00 to 500 about Kaleido scope and 2,000 to 100 about Petiaieh This morning a reaction set 111 in the quondam favounte's favour, and people begin to say that as he won the Middle Park Plate when only half fit, why should he not win the Guineas in similar circumstauces ' When seen in the paddock, too, he looked so immeasurably superior to anything there — the vciy ('Mit i<!'«l of a first class raeehoise — that theic was something of a iush to get on him, though by the majority his chance was still contemned. So many hor&es weie saddled near the post, that, in addition to Petiaieh and Kaleidoscope, we only saw Glaein, Father Claret, and Rosinante. Kaleidoscope was not much admired, and she was voted too long in the back; but Glacis is a line, gieat horse, and the most improved one we saw was Father Claret. Julius L\esar, fiom a glimpae we caught of him, appeared trained to perfection. Tho betting und'ji went little or no change with the exception of Petrarch's advance, Kaleidoscope keeping his position veiy fiimly, and 4 to 1 being taken about Great Tom. There was a slight delay at the post anil one or two breaks away, but Mi. M'George dropped his flag to a good stait Camcmbert and Julius Ctusar being the fust to show, but they had not gone far before Pctraich, in the centre of the couise, took up the 1 mining, pulling Luke out of the saddle, and it may with truth be said that theic was nothing else in the race from this point Glacis and Father Claret were about the liist two beaten, and at the Bushes tho ta\ouiitowas evidently in trouble. In vain did Julius Cesar go on in pursuit of Petrarch, who had not even been asked to gallop, and one of the easiest wins ever seen for a Two Thousand was recorded in Petrarch's favour by three leuytha — a groat performance^ and a very great horse. As he won the Middle Park unfit, so he has won the Two Thousand, and in 11 manner that would seem to show the Derby a mere question of health for him. Directly they passed the post the stentoi ian voice of a leading book-maker was heard offering 2,000 to 1,000 against him for the Epsom raco, and we believe that pi ice could not be obtained soon afterwards. There was but little cheering after the lace. Book -makers

who, in the slang phiaso, hail 'taken ihcrties ' with Petrarch were much too hai d h t to shont, and backeis as a lule stood Kaleidoscope instead of Ins stable com pamon. Lord DuppUu, though he backi d the winner, as we have before said, stood a very large stake on his other one ; while John Dawson had not a sixpence on Petrarch, and the money of him* elf ai d his friends was on the wrong one. It lifts been a Two Thousan I that \v 11 be long remembered in racing annals.' — Of the One Thousand the same joiuinl gives the following particular -.—"The th i teen horses which came to the post were despatched, without loss of tune, and wluu fail ly in their stride the lunning was taken up by La Seine in the cent'e of the couue, with Twine the PJaiden at her quartets, the pair being followed by Allumette, Oamelia, Zeo, Majesty, and Margarita, in wliich oider tli«*y ran to the Bushes Hill. Heie Twine the Plaiden was beaten and immediately atter Allumette came to the front, and, with her stable companion on her whip hand, held a two-lengths lead of La Seme into the Abingdon Mile Bottom, where the issue became a match between Count Lagrange's two, who ran locked together to the end. Camelia, running the longest, just won on the post by a head. There were three lengths between the second and third, Majesty being fourth, Zee fifth, Twine the Planlen sixth, with Mr. Crawford's pair and Solitude beaten off. Time by Benson's chronograph, lmiu. 53^sec. Count de Lagrange's Camelia, 1 ; Count de Lagrange's Alumett", 2 ; Mr. A. de Montgomery's La Seine, 3." | Here is a new idea for the footballers, or i at least that portion of them who are not satisfied with the usual Saturday afternoon's ' game, play in the moonlight. I see by a J Taranaki paper, a few evenings since a most j interesting game was played on Poveity Flat by the light of the moon. Play commenced shortly after seven o'clock, and continued for the usual two hours, one scratch team putting 14 points together against their opponents i)h. A large number of spectators were present, and the atfau seems to have been gay and festive. Advance, Taranaki ! and Auckland boys, don't be beaten, have a moonlight game with a good band on the gtound and half Auckland will turn out to see you. Touciimyivf.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/DSC18760717.2.35

Bibliographic details

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. UNKNWON, Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXXII, Issue 5230, 17 July 1876, Supplement

Word Count
1,827

SPORTS AND PASTIMES. UNKNWON Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXXII, Issue 5230, 17 July 1876, Supplement

Working